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Courses & Timetables

BIOSTATISTICS

IMPORTANT

  • Special students and students from other departments or universities require the permission of the course instructor.
  • Course numbers BIOS 691, 692, 693, 694, 695, 696, 697, 698 and 699 belong to a group of Special Topics course numbers, and can be used only once. If you have used any of these numbers in a previous course, please contact the Student Affairs Office.
  • Several required courses and relevant elective courses for our programs are offered at the department of Mathematics and Statistics. Please visit their website for further details on these courses.
  • Elective courses may also be taken from other universities in Montreal. Please see the ISM listings for courses open to McGill students.
  • Courses from other departments may also be appropriate; see, for example, PSYC 541.

Fall 2014

eboh_f2014_timetable_20140821.pdf

BIOS 601 Epidemiology: Introduction and Statistical Models

Dr. J. Hanley

Examples of applications of statistics and probability in epidemiologic research. Sources of epidemiologic data (surveys, experimental and non-experimental studies). Elementary data analysis for single and comparative epidemiologic parameters.

Prerequisite: undergraduate course in mathematical statistics at level of MATH 324 or permission of instructor.

Academic Credits: 4

BIOS 624 Data Analysis & Report Writing - Fall & Winter

andrea [dot] benedetti [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. A. Benedetti) | james [dot] hanley [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. J. Hanley)

Common data-analytic problems. Practical approaches to complex data. Graphical and tabular presentation of results. Writing reports for scientific journals, research collaborators, consulting clients.

Prerequisite: MATH 523 and MATH 533 or their equivalents (for Biostatistics & Math/Stat students). EPIB-607 and EPIB-621 for Epidemiology students.

Open to students in Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Math/Stat programs who have completed their first year courses. Students in other disciplines require permission of the instructor.

Academic Credits: 4

BIOS 630 Research Project/Practicum in Biostatistics

Critical appraisal of the biostatistical literature related to a specific statistical methodology. Topic to be approved by faculty member who will direct student and evaluate the paper. Projects will be carried out within a course framework, with a common start/end date for all students.

Academic Credits: 6

BIOS 637 Advanced Modeling: Survival and Other Multivariable Data

michal [dot] abrahamowicz [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. M. Abrahamowicz)

Advanced applied biostatistics course dealing with flexible modeling of non-linear effects of continuous covariates in multivariable analyses, and survival data, including e.g. time-varying covariates and time-dependent or cumulative effects. Focus on the concepts, limitations and advantages of specific methods, and interpretation of their results. In addition to 3 hours of weekly lectures, shared with epidemiology students, an additional hour/week focuses on statistical inference and complex simulation methods. Students get hands-on experience in designing and implementing simulations for survival analyses, through individual term projects.

Academic Credits: 4

Pre-requisites: Graduate students in Biostatistics or Math/Stat programs, or permission of the instructor. Students are expected to have a good understanding of multivariable regression and basic knowledge of survival analysis.

BIOS 690 M.Sc. Thesis

A review, appraisal of the performance, or application of, selected biostatistical methods, carried out under supervision.

Academic Credits: 24

BIOS 702 Ph.D. Proposal - Fall & Winter

michal [dot] abrahamowicz [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. M. Abrahamowicz) / michael [dot] kramer [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. M. Kramer)

The course will prepare students for their doctoral thesis research. Students will acquire essential skills for writing and defense of research objectives and methods. This course is cross-listed with EPIB 702.

Students will normally take this course in their second year of study, following the completion of BIOS 700 (PhD Theory Comprehensive Examination). Students are expected, under the active tutelage of their supervisors and thesis committee members, to have developed a scientifically appropriate research question that will be addressed by rigorous research methods of the highest quality. Students need to demonstrate essential grantsmanship skills in both writing and defending their research problem. While the exact methods of achieving the goals are often not easily described in initial stages of biostatistics research, the student will be expected to describe a well-defined problem, perform a thorough review of the relevant literature, and provide an outline of a proposed solution(s) to the problem.

The course is run over the Fall and Winter terms. It will not be offered during the summer months. The course will meet every week that a presentation is scheduled. It is expected that all students enrolled in a given academic year will attend all presentations by their fellow students in both semesters (i.e. presentations by students in both the Biostatistics and the Epidemiology programs), regardless of the timing of their own protocol defenses. In the first week of the Fall semester, the students will meet with the course instructors to discuss the goals, expectations, and procedures.

For additional information see:

BIOS702Protocol [pdf]

Academic Credits: 0

MATH 533 Honours Regression and Analysis of Variance

MATH 556 Mathematical Statistics 1

Winter 2015

eboh_w2015_timetable_20140806.pdf

BIOS 602 Epidemiology: Regression Models

olli [dot] saarela [at] mail [dot] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. O. Saarela)

Multivariable regression models for proportions, rates, and their differences/ratios; Conditional logistic regression; Proportional hazards and other parametric/semi-parametric models; unmatched, nested, and self-matched case-control studies; links to Cox’s method; Rate ratio estimation when “time-dependent” membership in contrasted categories.

Prerequisite: MATH 556 and BIOS 601 or their equivalents or permission of instructor.

Academic Credits: 4

BIOS 612 Advanced Generalized Linear Models

erica [dot] moodie [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. E. Moodie)

Statistical methods for multinomial outcomes, overdispersion, and continuous and categorical correlated data; approaches to inference (estimating equations, likelihood-based methods, semi-parametric methods); analysis of longitudinal data; theoretical content and applications.

Prerequisite: MATH 523 and MATH 533 or their equivalents or permission of instructor.

Open to students in Biostatistics and Math/Stat programs. Students in other disciplines require permission of the instructor.

Academic Credits: 4

BIOS 624 Data Analysis & Report Writing - Fall & Winter

andrea [dot] benedetti [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. A. Benedetti) | james [dot] hanley [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. J. Hanley)

Common data-analytic problems. Practical approaches to complex data. Graphical and tabular presentation of results. Writing reports for scientific journals, research collaborators, consulting clients.

Prerequisite: MATH 523 and MATH 533 or their equivalents (for Biostatistics & Math/Stat students). EPIB-607 and EPIB-621 for Epidemiology students.

Open to students in Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Math/Stat programs who have completed their first year courses. Students in other disciplines require permission of the instructor.

Academic Credits: 4

BIOS 630 Research Project/Practicum in Biostatistics

Critical appraisal of the biostatistical literature related to a specific statistical methodology. Topic to be approved by faculty member who will direct student and evaluate the paper. Projects will be carried out within a course framework, with a common start/end date for all students.

Academic Credits: 6

BIOS 690 M.Sc. Thesis

A review, appraisal of the performance, or application of, selected biostatistical methods, carried out under supervision.

Academic Credits: 24

BIOS 702 Ph.D. Proposal - Fall & Winter

michal [dot] abrahamowicz [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. M. Abrahamowicz) / michael [dot] kramer [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. M. Kramer)

The course will prepare students for their doctoral thesis research. Students will acquire essential skills for writing and defense of research objectives and methods. This course is cross-listed with EPIB 702.

Students will normally take this course in their second year of study, following the completion of BIOS 700 (PhD Theory Comprehensive Examination). Students are expected, under the active tutelage of their supervisors and thesis committee members, to have developed a scientifically appropriate research question that will be addressed by rigorous research methods of the highest quality. Students need to demonstrate essential grantsmanship skills in both writing and defending their research problem. While the exact methods of achieving the goals are often not easily described in initial stages of biostatistics research, the student will be expected to describe a well-defined problem, perform a thorough review of the relevant literature, and provide an outline of a proposed solution(s) to the problem.

The course is run over the Fall and Winter terms. It will not be offered during the summer months. The course will meet every week that a presentation is scheduled. It is expected that all students enrolled in a given academic year will attend all presentations by their fellow students in both semesters (i.e. presentations by students in both the Biostatistics and the Epidemiology programs), regardless of the timing of their own protocol defenses. In the first week of the Fall semester, the students will meet with the course instructors to discuss the goals, expectations, and procedures.

For additional information see:

BIOS702Protocol [pdf]

Academic Credits: 0

MATH 523 Generalized Linear Models

MATH 557 Mathematical Statistics 2

Summer 2015

BIOS 700 Ph.D. Comprehensive Exam, Part A / BIOS 701 Ph.D. Comprehensive Exam, Part B

erica [dot] moodie [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. E. Moodie)

The comprehensive exam is given in two parts. The objective is to assess the degree to which students have been able to assimilate and apply statistical theory and methods for biostatistics. BIOS 700 (written exam) is held twice yearly and addresses statistical theory. BIOS 701 (take-home exam) is held once yearly and addresses applied biostatistics.

For additional information see:

BIOS700CompExam [.pdf]

BIOS701CompExam [.pdf]

Academic Credits: 0