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Joining HCBL

TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES

Highly motivated students and postdoctoral fellows with kinesiology, clinical, engineering, neuroscience, psychology or related background are welcomed to apply to join the HBCL lab.

Postdoctoral Training

Post-docs with experience in brain imaging or motor control are invited to contact Dr. Paquette. For more information on postdoctoral fellowships at McGill visit Post-docs.


Graduate Student Training

Master of Science (M.Sc.) in Kinesiology and Physical Education (Thesis)

The objective of a M.Sc. degree is to learn how to conduct a research study and publish data. A M.Sc. thesis must be based on the student’s own research and must show familiarity with previous work in the field and must demonstrate the ability to carry out research and to organize results. The thesis will be manuscript-based. Duration of studies is 2 years and students are expected to work full time toward their M.Sc. degree. In addition, students will be expected to attend conferences, join professional organizations and participate in professional development activities that contribute to the growth of Motor Control/Neurosciences. Students are encouraged to visit Prospective, GPS and Graduate sites for more information about graduate studies in the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education at McGill University.

Prospective students must be competitive to receive external funding (e.g., scholarships, fellowships, etc.).  Applications for funding is submitted 1 year prior to the start of a graduate program. Therefore, students interested in M.Sc. studies need to contact Dr. Paquette early on, at least by the end of the 2nd year of their undergraduate degree or preferably earlier (see undergraduate training opportunities below). Students may also be eligible for internal funding opportunities, such as entrance scholarships and fellowships.

Major funding agencies are:

M.Sc. Thesis Program in Motor Control/Neuroscience

Required Courses (9 credits)

[course medium EDKP 605]

EDPE 676 Intermediate Statistics 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

NEUR 507 Topics in Radionuclide Imaging 
EDKP 617 Seminar in K&PE 1
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

EDKP 618 Seminar in K&PE 2
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

EDKP 619 Seminar in K&PE 3
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

EDKP 620 Seminar in K & PE 4
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

Complementary Courses (12 credits; 3 Fall Year 1 and 9 credits Fall Year 2)

EDKP 566 Advanced Biomechanics Theory 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

EDKP 603 Individual Reading Course 1 6 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

EDKP 616 Individual Reading Course 2 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

EDKP 630 Human Walking Mechanics 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

EDKP 635 Modeling Human Movement 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

EDKP 664 Motor Learning 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

EDKP 671 Experimental Problems 3 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

EDKP 672 Experimental Problems 6 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

Courses from the Faculty of Science or Medicine chosen in consultation with the supervisor (500, 600, or 700 level)

Thesis Courses (24 credits)

EDKP 691 Thesis Research 1 6 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

EDKP 692 Thesis Research 2 6 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

EDKP 693 Thesis Research 3 6 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

EDKP 694 Thesis Research 4 6 Credits
    Offered in the:
  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Summer

 

Doctoral (Ph.D.) Program

At the Ph.D. level, students must display in their thesis original scholarship and must be a distinct contribution to knowledge. The thesis will be manuscript-based, usually involving a series (2-4) of studies that are connected to a common theme/topic. Duration of studies is 3-5 years and students are expected to work full time toward their Ph.D. degree. In addition, students will be expected to present at conferences, publish, join professional organizations, and participate in professional development activities that contribute to the growth of Motor Control/Neurosciences. They are also expected to serve as a role model and leader for undergraduate and master’s-level students working in the lab. Students are encouraged to visit Prospective, GPS and Graduate for more information about graduate studies in the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education at McGill University.

Prospective students must be competitive to receive external funding. They must have high M.Sc. GPA, thesis-based program with at least 1 peer-reviewed presentation and publication (which may be in preparation). Applications for funding is submitted 1 year prior to the start of a graduate program. Therefore, students interested in Ph.D. studies need to contact Dr. Paquette prior to the end of their M.Sc. degree. Students may also be eligible for internal funding opportunities, such as entrance scholarships and fellowships.

Major funding agencies are:

Ph.D. Thesis Program in Motor Control/Neuroscience

Required Courses

NEUR 507  Topics in Radionuclide Imaging 3 Credits

Seminar in Kinesiology and Physical Education (each semester registered as Ph.D. student)

2 Statistical and/or Research Methods selected with the supervisor

1-2 theory-based complementary courses selected with the supervisor

 


Undergraduate Student Training

Guidelines for undergraduate research in the HBCL lab:

Potential applicants must be highly motivated, curious and independent. Students are expected to be perseverant, tenacious, resourceful, responsible, attentive to detail and responsive to guidance. Students involved in research projects will not be told exactly what to do on a daily basis, but are expected to follow advice and maintain a reasonable rate of progress. Undergraduate students are not expected to know anything coming in to the lab, but are expected to learn the skills needed to conduct research by actively participating in the HBCL lab life. U1 and U2 students are preferred while students in U3 may be considered. Involvement in a research project must be high priority to students and must demonstrate that medical/rehab school applications, job searches, varsity sports, etc. will not be impediments to research progress.

Potential applicants must realize that research is not like a class; it usually takes a semester to get oriented to the ways of the lab and acquires basic knowledge and skills to finish a project. Thus, a minimum of 2 semesters and 3 credit hours or 10 hours/week commitment is required. Summer work is strongly encouraged and students should apply to internal and external funding agencies. The first semester is probationary.

Students can volunteer, receive academic credit or receive a fellowship to work in the lab. Undergraduate Student Research Award deadlines are usually due early in the winter semester(Opportunities). You may be considered for paid work in the lab only after 2 exemplary semesters working in the lab.

Grades will be based on a final presentation at a lab meeting, your weekly presentation at lab meetings, contribution to discussion of lab meetings, net results of your semester’s work, and the usefulness and clarity of your final report. Consistent progress over the semester is more highly regarded than heroic efforts at the end of the semester.

You will be assigned a graduate student mentor to whom you will report directly and receive guidance. In return for their mentorship, you will help the graduate student with their research. This will allow you to familiarize yourself with the lab and gain a background to pursue your individual projects.

Before you apply, take a look at our research page and familiarize yourself with our past projects and take time to think about what kind of research would excite you. What do you want to gain from a research experience? Why should we be excited about you joining the lab?

How to apply:

Read through the projects presented on the pages linked above. Most are ongoing projects that will take a least two or three semester for you to make a contribution. Please send an e-mail with the following information to caroline [dot] paquette [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Dr. Paquette):

  • Your name and contact information
  • Your major, GPA (min 3.0 required, >3.5 preferred), and expected graduation date
  • Courses taken and grades (or attach an unofficial transcript)
  • A short essay (1-2 pages) on why you want to do research and some information on what kind of research you would like to do. What would be the coolest project for you? Give us an idea of something scientific that you read about and thought was interesting.
  • Name of some references and contact information
  • Anything else you would like to tell us about