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His and her pain circuitry in the spinal cord

New research released today in Nature Neuroscience reveals for the first time that pain is processed in male and female mice using different cells. These findings have far-reaching implications for our basic understanding of pain, how we develop the next generation of medications for chronic pain—which is by far the most prevalent human health condition—and the way we execute basic biomedical research using mice.

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Published on : 29 Jun 2015

New hope in the fight against pain

An international study led by scientists at McGill University reports, for the first time, that drugs that selectively target the melatonin MT2 receptor represent a novel class of analgesic drugs that could be used to treat patients with neuropathic pain.

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Published on : 17 Feb 2015

The secret of empathy

The ability to express empathy -- the capacity to share and feel another’s emotions -- is limited by the stress of being around strangers, according to a new study published today in the journal Current Biology.

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Published on : 15 Jan 2015

Jeffrey Mogil awarded Mayday Pain & Society Fellowship

The Mayday Fund has selected Jeffrey Mogil to be a fellow under the Mayday Pain & Society. He is one of six experts in pain management to receive the honour.

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Published on : 20 Aug 2014

Pain curbs sex drive in female mice, but not in males

“Not tonight, dear, I have a headache.” Generally speaking, that line is attributed to the wife in a couple, implying that women’s sexual desire is more affected by pain than men’s.

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Published on : 22 Apr 2014

Study points to role of nervous system in arthritis

Arthritis is a debilitating disorder affecting one in 10 Canadians, with pain caused by inflammation and damage to joints.

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Published on : 13 Jun 2013

Chronic pain alters DNA marking in the brain

Injuries that result in chronic pain, such as limb injuries, and those unrelated to the brain are associated with epigenetic changes in the brain which persist months after the injury, according to researchers at McGill University. Epigenetics explores how the environment – including diet, exposure to contaminants and social conditions such as poverty – can have a long-term impact on the activity of our genes.

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Published on : 14 Feb 2013