music

The Montreal Chamber Music Festival and PRIZMA, a program of McGill’s School of Continuing Studies, are proud to collaborate for the first time on a special series of lectures and concerts devoted to Beethoven’s string quartets.

Classified as: concert, music, festival, Montreal, PRIZMA, Beethoven, classical, chamber, chambre
Published on: 7 Mar 2017

The same brain-chemical system that mediates feelings of pleasure from sex, recreational drugs, and food is also critical to experiencing musical pleasure, according to a study by McGill University researchers published today in the Nature journal Scientific Reports.

Classified as: music, brain, drugs, chemistry, sex, Scientific Reports, opioids, Levitin
Published on: 8 Feb 2017
Have you ever met someone who just wasn’t into music? They may have a condition called specific musical anhedonia, which affects three-to-five per cent of the population.
 
Researchers at the University of Barcelona and the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University have discovered that people with this condition showed reduced functional connectivity between cortical regions responsible for processing sound and subcortical regions related to reward.
 
Classified as: music, neuroscience, Montreal Neurological Institute, Robert Zatorre, society and culture, University of Barcelona, anhedonia
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Published on: 4 Jan 2017

What does the 1960s Beatles hit “Girl” have in common with Astor Piazzolla’s evocative tango composition “Libertango”?

Probably not much, to the casual listener. But in the mind of one famously eclectic singer-songwriter, the two songs are highly similar. That’s one of the surprising findings of an unusual neuroscience study based on brain scans of the musician Sting.

Classified as: music, neuroscience, Daniel Levitin, brain imaging, science and technology, MRI, Sting, University of California at Santa Barbara, Scott Grafton, Neurocase
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Published on: 15 Aug 2016

A team of scientists from McGill University, the University of Cambridge, and Stanford Graduate School of Business developed a new method of coding and categorizing music. They found that people’s preference for these musical categories is driven by personality. The researchers say the findings have important implications for industry and health professionals.

Classified as: music, McGill University, Daniel Levitin, CBC Music, Arts and culture
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Published on: 10 May 2016

By Cynthia Lee

Newsroom

Everyone marches to the beat of their own drum: From walking to talking to producing music, different people’s movements occur at different speeds.

Classified as: music, Movement, caroline palmer, march, society and culture, beat, drum, speed, rhythm, coordination, Anna Zamm, Chelsea Wellman, Journal of Experimental Psychology
Published on: 9 Feb 2016

Masashi Usui has over 18 years of experience playing the saxophone. Yet when he applied to the Master of Music program at McGill’s Schulich School of Music, he was told that he needed to improve his English in order to be admitted.

Read more on The Next Page, the School of Continuing Studies' newsletter.

Classified as: music, language, jazz, masashi, usui
Published on: 3 Aug 2015

Study fuels nature versus nurture debate

How do you get to Carnegie Hall? New research on the brain’s capacity to learn suggests there’s more to it than the adage that “practise makes perfect.” A music-training study by scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, at McGill University and colleagues in Germany found evidence to distinguish the parts of the brain that account for individual talent from the parts that are activated through training.

Classified as: music, neuroscience, brain, training, Robert Zatorre, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, mcgill faculty of medicine research
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Published on: 28 Jul 2015


Sometimes an artist’s most meaningful projects arise by chance, in everyday interactions, rather than through any grand plan. So, it seems, was the case with the intrepid cellist Matt Haimovitz, whose latest enthusiasm came about in the halls of McGill University, where he has been on the faculty for more than a decade.
Article from the The Boston Globe.

Classified as: music, schulich school of music, cello, Matt Haimovitz
Published on: 13 Jul 2015

With classical music's popularity thriving in Asia (as millions of youngsters in China in particular are studying piano and violin from early age), and with the financial difficulties facing classical music in the West, opera houses in particular (as the New York City Opera bankruptcy, the present negotiations at the Metropolitan Opera, the last minute rescue of this year's season at the Rome opera house, and the constant strikes at classical music venues in France suggest), the question is: can classical music be financed without significant government subsidies? 

Classified as: music, Asia, Reuven Brenner, metropolitan opera, opera, REPAP, world of chance
Published on: 15 Aug 2014

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