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LEARN: Music to his Ears

Masashi Usui has over 18 years of experience playing the saxophone. Yet when he applied to the Master of Music program at McGill’s Schulich School of Music, he was told that he needed to improve his English in order to be admitted. Read more on The Next Page, the School of Continuing Studies' newsletter.

Published on : 03 Aug 2015

Practice doesn’t always make perfect (depending on your brain)

Study fuels nature versus nurture debate How do you get to Carnegie Hall? New research on the brain’s capacity to learn suggests there’s more to it than the adage that “practise makes perfect.” A music-training study by scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, at McGill University and colleagues in Germany found evidence to distinguish the parts of the brain that account for individual talent from the parts that are activated through training.

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Published on : 28 Jul 2015

MATT HAIMOVITZ, PERIOD

Sometimes an artist’s most meaningful projects arise by chance, in everyday interactions, rather than through any grand plan. So, it seems, was the case with the intrepid cellist Matt Haimovitz, whose latest enthusiasm came about in the halls of McGill University, where he has been on the faculty for more than a decade. Article from the The Boston Globe.

Published on : 13 Jul 2015

Brubeck à l’apéro

La fin de l’année universitaire approche, tout comme la fin de la saison de concerts de l’École de musique Schulich. Ne manquez pas les prochains concerts du secteur jazz : Le jeudi 26 mars, à 17 h 30, Rémi Bolduc, directeur du secteur jazz à McGill et considéré comme l’un des meilleurs saxophonistes de jazz au Canada, présentera des extraits de son dernier disque, un hommage au pianiste et compositeur américain Dave Brubeck. Le concert est présenté dans le cadre de la série « Jazz à l’heure de pointe » de l’École de musique Schulich.

Published on : 18 Mar 2015

Asia and a happy future for opera

With classical music's popularity thriving in Asia (as millions of youngsters in China in particular are studying piano and violin from early age), and with the financial difficulties facing classical music in the West, opera houses in particular (as the New York City Opera bankruptcy, the present negotiations at the Metropolitan Opera, the last minute rescue of this year's season at the Rome opera house, and the constant strikes at classical music venues in France suggest), the question is: can classical music be financed without significant government subsidies? 

Published on : 15 Aug 2014

How the brain recognizes familiar music

Research from McGill University reveals that the brain’s motor network helps people remember and recognize music that they have performed in the past better than music they have only heard. A recent study by Prof. Caroline Palmer of the Department of Psychology sheds new light on how humans perceive and produce sounds, and may pave the way for investigations into whether motor learning could improve or protect memory or cognitive impairment in aging populations. The research is published in the journal Cerebral Cortex.

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Published on : 12 Mar 2014

Why we buy music

New study shows what happens in the brain to make music rewarding A new study reveals what happens in our brain when we decide to purchase a piece of music when we hear it for the first time. The study, conducted at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital – The Neuro, McGill University and published in the journal Science on April 12, pinpoints the specific brain activity that makes new music rewarding and predicts the decision to purchase music.

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Published on : 11 Apr 2013

Join us at our inaugural symposium on Music and Language, with a focus this year on Development

Registration is now open for the CRBLM Inaugural Symposium on Music and Language, to be held in Montréal, Canada on Friday, May 3rd and Saturday May 4th 2013. A brief conference program is included below.  Full details about the conference and registration information are available at www.crblm.ca/symposium/registration  

Published on : 03 Apr 2013

Early music lessons boost brain development

Montreal researchers find that music lessons before age seven create stronger connections in the brain If you started piano lessons in grade one, or played the recorder in kindergarten, thank your parents and teachers. Those lessons you dreaded – or loved – helped develop your brain.

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Published on : 12 Feb 2013