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Warming Temperatures Threaten Fragile Balance in Canadian Arctic

"As a doctoral candidate at McGill University in Montreal, I have spent three years researching how the planet’s changing climate is affecting the polar desert ecology of the high Arctic. It’s precisely this balance of climate and permafrost, ice and ecosystems that I’ve come here to study." Sept. 23, 2014 | NY Times by: Michael Becker

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Published on : 28 Sep 2014

Reducing water scarcity possible by 2050

Water scarcity is not a problem just for the developing world. In California, legislators are currently proposing a $7.5 billion emergency water plan to their voters; and U.S. federal officials last year warned residents of Arizona and Nevada that they could face cuts in Colorado River water deliveries in 2016.

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Published on : 29 Aug 2014

Global Warming: Planet Hits Natural Pause Button (featuring Shaun Lovejoy)

Global temperatures between 1998 and 2013 indicate a slowdown in global warming, but this was due to natural cooling fluctuation and not due to any decrease in greenhouse gas emissions. This has been proved by statistical analysis of the temperatures, conducted by McGill University physics professor Shaun Lovejoy. (Exerpt from Jayalakshmi K, International Business Times)

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Published on : 25 Jul 2014

Global warming ‘pause’ reflects natural fluctuation

Statistical analysis of average global temperatures between 1998 and 2013 shows that the slowdown in global warming during this period is consistent with natural variations in temperature, according to research by McGill University physics professor Shaun Lovejoy.

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Published on : 21 Jul 2014

McGill Nonlinear Physics Professor and Climatologist Shaun Lovejoy: Global Warming is not a "Natural" Occurrence

Opinion: Research Shows the Global Warming isn't natural Published on June 9, 2014 | The Gazette by: Shaun Lovejoy Last year, the Quebec Skeptics Society laid down a challenge: “If anthropogenic global warming is as strong as scientists claim, then why do they need supercomputers to demonstrate it?” My immediate response was: “They don’t.”

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Published on : 11 Jun 2014

New permafrost is forming around shrinking Arctic lakes

By Katherine Gombay - News - June 10 Researchers from McGill and the U.S. Geological Survey, more used to measuring thawing permafrost than its expansion, have made a surprising discovery. There is new permafrost forming around Twelvemile Lake in the interior of Alaska. But they have also quickly concluded that, given the current rate of climate change, it won’t last beyond the end of this century.

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Published on : 10 Jun 2014

Climate change is bad for Inuit health, research group says

McGill group says the Arctic needs better adaptation policies Published on April 28, 2014 | Nunatsiaq Onlineby David Murphy Inuit are vulnerable to climate change, and it’s time for new policy to adapt, a group of researchers says in a new report That’s the message from the Climate Change Adaptation Research Group, led by James Ford of McGill University, who released a paper April 24 about the need for better adaption strategies, especially in health, for Inuit.

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Published on : 01 May 2014

Climate Change: Extinction of Ice-Free Antarctic Polynyas Due to Trapped Ocean Heat (Eric Galbraith)

Researchers from the McGill University and University of Pennsylvania have found evidence to show climate change is the main reason for the disappearance of ice-free regions, known as polynyas. Find story links below

Published on : 01 Apr 2014

Global warming felt to deepest reaches of ocean

In the mid-1970s, the first available satellite images of Antarctica during the polar winter revealed a huge ice-free region within the ice pack of the Weddell Sea. This ice-free region, or polynya, stayed open for three full winters before it closed.

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Published on : 03 Mar 2014

Feeling hot, hot, hot

We’re not used to thinking of ourselves as animals. But as Jason Samson sees it, climate is as important in shaping the distribution and movement of humans as it is in other animals. The McGill-trained ecologist and fellow researchers have been using modeling techniques similar to those used to define the ecological niche for plant and animal species to explore the correlation between climate patterns and population growth in the contiguous United States between 1900-2000. And what they discovered was a pronounced population shift away from areas within the U.S. with cool and seasonal climates, towards those areas that are warmer and drier year-round, and they found that this was the case even when it meant moving further away from agricultural lands. 

Published on : 25 Oct 2012