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Targeting the biological clock could slow the progression of cancer

Does the biological clock in cancer cells influence tumour growth? Yes, according to a study conducted by Nicolas Cermakian, a professor in McGill University’s Department of Psychiatry. Published in the journal BMC Biology, these results show for the first time that directly targeting the biological clock in a cancerous tumour has an impact on its development.

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Published on : 16 Feb 2017

A surprise advance in the treatment of adult cancers

A team of researchers at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) has found an epigenetic modification that might be the cause of 15% of adult cancers of the throat linked to alcohol and tobacco use. This is a first in the field of epigenetics and the researchers are hopeful that the discovery can blaze a path in the development of new, targeted, more effective treatments that could arise over the next few years.

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Published on : 11 Jan 2017

4-week prehabilitation prepares cancer patients for surgery

Just four weeks of prehabilitation (pre-surgery preparation) may be enough to help some cancer patients get in shape for surgery. That’s according to a recent study of close to 120 colorectal cancer patients in Montreal. This potentially means that, barring unforeseen circumstances that stem from the surgery itself, their recovery is likely to be speedier too, according to earlier research from the same McGill-led team.

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Published on : 01 Dec 2016

Medication against schizophrenia inhibits pancreatic cancer

A receptor for the dopamine neurotransmitter promotes growth and spread of pancreatic cancer -- and schizophrenia drugs, which block the function of this receptor, slowed tumor growth and metastatic spread in mice, according to researchers at McGill University and the German Cancer Research Center.

Published on : 07 Sep 2016

The impact of night work on our immune system

McGill Newsroom Study reveals the impact of night work You cross paths with him at the break of dawn in the corridors of the Metro. He looks bleary-eyed and pallid. This worker’s night shift just ended. His body clocks are out of sync with one another, and, imperceptibly, they’re also out of sync with his environment. In the long run, this night owl could be at greater risk of developing cardiovascular, autoimmune diseases or certain types of cancer.

Published on : 14 Jun 2016

New name for McGill Department of Oncology

McGill Newsroom Newly named Gerald Bronfman Department of Oncology recognizes family’s enduring support In recognition of the Bronfman family’s enduring support for oncology programs and research at McGill University, the Faculty of Medicine’s Department of Oncology has been named the Gerald Bronfman Department of Oncology, in honour of one of the family’s major benefactors.

Published on : 13 Jun 2016

Goodman Cancer Research Gala raises $2.1 million

McGill Newsroom Pioneering research at McGill’s Goodman Cancer Research Centre gets boost The 4th Goodman Cancer Research Gala has raised more than $2.1 million to fund foundational research, more effective diagnostic tools and the development of new treatments and therapies for cancer patients.  The Gala was held on Sunday, June 5 in Montreal, bringing together more than 800 guests in support of McGill University’s Rosalind and Morris Goodman Cancer Research Centre.

Published on : 06 Jun 2016

Diabetes drug found not to cause pancreatic cancer

By Tod Hoffman, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research The use of incretin-based drugs is not associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the latest issue of the British Medical Journal (BMJ). The research was conducted by the Canadian Network for Observational Drug Effect Studies (CNODES), which used the health records of almost 1 million patients with types 2 diabetes.

Published on : 22 Feb 2016

A new way to starve lung cancer?

Preventing cancer cells from growing by understanding what they 'eat'.

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Published on : 20 Oct 2015

Breakthrough in fight against muscle wasting diseases

It is estimated that half of all cancer patients suffer from a muscle wasting syndrome called cachexia. Cancer cachexia impairs quality of life and response to therapy, which increases morbidity and mortality of cancer patients. Currently, there is no approved treatment for muscle wasting but a new study from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) and University of Alberta could be a game changer for patients, improving both quality of life and longevity. The research team discovered a new gene involved in muscle wasting that could be a good target for drug development.

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Published on : 15 Sep 2015

Breakthrough in understanding how cancer cells metastasize

Montreal Neurological Institute scientists discover a new mechanism driving spread of cancer A protein commonly found in human cells could be an important switch that activates cancer cell metastasis, according to a new study by researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital - The Neuro at McGill University and the MUHC. The finding focuses attention on a biological mechanism that until now was largely overlooked. The discovery of the protein’s effect significantly expands our understanding of epithelial cancers such as breast and lung cancer.

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Published on : 26 Feb 2015

Revolutionary new probe zooms in on cancer cells

Improves tumour surgeries and extends survival times for brain cancer patients VIDEO: http://bit.ly/1EYjsTV

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Published on : 11 Feb 2015