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Scientists identify key gene associated with addiction

A new study published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry by a team led by Salah El Mestikawy, Ph.D., researcher at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute (CIUSSS de l’Ouest-de-l’île-de-Montréal), professor at McGill University and head of research at CNRS INSERM UPMC in Paris, opens the field to new understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying addiction in humans.

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Published on : 04 Aug 2015

Addiction: abnormal communication in the brain

January 29, 2013 - Addiction to cigarettes, drugs and other stimulants has been linked in the past to the brain’s frontal lobes, but now there is scientific evidence that indicates where in the frontal cortex addiction takes hold and how.  Addiction could be a result of abnormal communication between two areas of the frontal lobes linked to decision-making.  The discovery will undoubtedly stimulate clinical work on new therapies for millions of people who suffer from addiction. The research by lead authors Dr.

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Published on : 05 Feb 2013

Study shows majority of smokers re-ignite their habit following heart attack

Despite obvious motivation for quitting, 2/3 of patients will resume smoking within twelve months

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Published on : 29 Jan 2013

Addiction: abnormal communication in the brain

Addiction to cigarettes, drugs and other stimulants has been linked in the past to the brain’s frontal lobes, but now there is scientific evidence that indicates where in the frontal cortex addiction takes hold and how.  Addiction could be a result of abnormal communication between two areas of the frontal lobes linked to decision-making.  The discovery will undoubtedly stimulate clinical work on new therapies for millions of people who suffer from addiction.

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Published on : 29 Jan 2013

How genetics shape our addictions

Genes predict the brain’s reaction to smoking  Have you ever wondered why some people find it so much easier to stop smoking than others? New research shows that vulnerability to smoking addiction is shaped by our genes. A study from the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital - The Neuro, McGill University shows that people with genetically fast nicotine metabolism have a significantly greater brain response to smoking cues than those with slow nicotine metabolism.

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Published on : 20 Sep 2012