Robert Zatorre

Society recognizes scholarly, research and artistic excellence.

Congratulations to Dr. Edith Hamel and Dr. Robert Zatorre, who have been elected Fellows of the Royal Society of Canada. Election to the academies of the Royal Society of Canada is the highest honour a scholar can achieve in the Arts, Humanities and Sciences.

Classified as: edith hamel, Robert Zatorre, royal society of canada, rsc
Published on: 7 Sep 2017
Have you ever met someone who just wasn’t into music? They may have a condition called specific musical anhedonia, which affects three-to-five per cent of the population.
 
Researchers at the University of Barcelona and the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University have discovered that people with this condition showed reduced functional connectivity between cortical regions responsible for processing sound and subcortical regions related to reward.
 
Classified as: music, neuroscience, Montreal Neurological Institute, Robert Zatorre, society and culture, University of Barcelona, anhedonia
Category:
Published on: 4 Jan 2017

Have you ever met someone who just wasn’t into music? They may have a condition called specific musical anhedonia, which affects three-to-five per cent of the population.

Researchers at the University of Barcelona and the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University have discovered that people with this condition showed reduced functional connectivity between cortical regions responsible for processing sound and subcortical regions related to reward.

Classified as: neuroscience, Robert Zatorre, specific musical anhedonia, fMRI, University of Barcelona
Published on: 4 Jan 2017

By Shawn Hayward, Montreal Neurological Institute

Discovery will inform further research into hearing disorders and brain training

Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital at McGill University have made an important discovery about the human auditory system and how to study it, findings that could lead to better testing and diagnosis of hearing-related disorders.

Classified as: Robert Zatorre, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, brain training, health and lifestyle, science and technology, Emily Coffey, hearing, hearing disorder, frequency-following responses, neuroplasticity, neuroproject
Published on: 6 Apr 2016

Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital at McGill University have made an important discovery about the human auditory system and how to study it, findings that could lead to better testing and diagnosis of hearing-related disorders.

The researchers detected frequency-following responses (FFR) coming from a part of the brain not previously known to emit them. FFRs are neural signals generated in the brain when people hear sounds.

Classified as: Research, MNI, Robert Zatorre, MEG, Emily Coffey, auditory response, sound processing
Category:
Published on: 6 Apr 2016

How do you get to Carnegie Hall? New research on the brain’s capacity to learn suggests there’s more to it than the adage that “practise makes perfect.” A music-training study by scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, at McGill University and colleagues in Germany found evidence to distinguish the parts of the brain that account for individual talent from the parts that are activated through training.

Classified as: brain, plasticity, McGill University, talent, Robert Zatorre, brain imaging, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, music training study, auditory-motor learning, Montreal’s International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research (BRAMS)
Category:
Published on: 28 Jul 2015

Study fuels nature versus nurture debate

How do you get to Carnegie Hall? New research on the brain’s capacity to learn suggests there’s more to it than the adage that “practise makes perfect.” A music-training study by scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, at McGill University and colleagues in Germany found evidence to distinguish the parts of the brain that account for individual talent from the parts that are activated through training.

Classified as: music, neuroscience, brain, training, Robert Zatorre, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, mcgill faculty of medicine research
Category:
Published on: 28 Jul 2015

The Neuro’s McConnell Brain Imaging Centre reaches a milestone

How does the brain grow and develop in childhood and aging? How does brain activity shape and unfold within milliseconds? How does our brain respond to objects, faces, food, and music? How is the brain affected in drug abuse, multiple sclerosis, depression? How can we better prepare for neurosurgeries?

Classified as: neuroscience, brain, Robert Zatorre, Sylvain Baillet, mcgill faculty of medicine research, McConnell Brain Imaging Centre
Category:
Published on: 9 Feb 2015

Montreal researchers find that music lessons before age seven create stronger connections in the brain

If you started piano lessons in grade one, or played the recorder in kindergarten, thank your parents and teachers. Those lessons you dreaded – or loved – helped develop your brain. The younger you started music lessons, the stronger the connections in your brain.

Classified as: music, collaboration, neuroscience, brain, Development, Neurology, creativity, Robert Zatorre
Category:
Published on: 12 Feb 2013