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Faculty of Science news

Royal Society's Chemistry World - DNA motors on

As a supramolecular chemist, Hanadi Sleiman found herself strongly drawn to manmade DNA structures. 'We think of DNA as the most programmable structure there is. I thought - if it is - let me try to incorporate it into regular supramolecular structures,' says the professor at McGill University, Montreal, Canada.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Published on : 10 Jan 2012

BBC - Carbon emissions 'will defer Ice Age'

Human emissions of carbon dioxide will defer the next Ice Age, say scientists. The last Ice Age ended about 11,500 years ago, and when the next one should begin has not been entirely clear.

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Published on : 09 Jan 2012

Montreal Gazette - Water purifier, cancer curer: Truth and lies about silver

(Chemistry professor Joe Schwarcz): A child born into a wealthy family is said to have "been born with a silver spoon in his mouth." The silver represents wealth, but thanks to the "oligodynamic effect," it may even have a connection to health.

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Published on : 07 Jan 2012

Back to the future: Supersoldier ants illuminate evolution

Researchers have discovered they can induce supersoldiers in Pheidole ant species that never had them before. These supersoldier anomalies represent dormant ancestral potential that can be invoked by changes in the environment. These findings are groundbreaking for evolutionary theory, because they show there is dormant genetic potential that can be locked in place for a very long time.

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Published on : 06 Jan 2012

BBC, National Post, Nature, et al. - Ants turned into 'supersoldiers'

In 2006, while collecting ants on an abandoned property in central Long Island, biologist Ehab Abouheif of McGill University noticed eight unusually oversized ants. They were anomalies to the region, but looked similar to the so-called "supersoldier" ants found in the American Southwest.

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Published on : 06 Jan 2012

Westmount Examiner - Taking science to new heights

The world of science captured on the television or computer screens seen through a child's eyes is a fascinating one.

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Published on : 22 Dec 2011

In hot water: Ice Age findings forecast problems

Data from end of the last Ice Age confirm effects of climate change on oceans.

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Published on : 19 Dec 2011

Discovery News - The big questions for 2012

Could 2012 be the year of Chickenosaurus, the first dinosaur to live in modern times? You might recall our story from a few years ago, describing what was then referred to as "Dinochicken."

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Published on : 17 Dec 2011

Montreal Gazette - 'Cosmeceuticals' offer expensive hope in a bottle

(Chemistry prof Joe Schwarcz): They sold out after just four hours. And they weren't even hotcakes. They were just little capsules. But these capsules came with a nifty promise.

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Published on : 17 Dec 2011

La Presse - Le boson de Higgs sous la loupe des physiciens

La physique des particules est en vedette cet automne. Après avoir révélé en octobre une anomalie pouvant remettre en question des théories fondamentales, voilà qu'une équipe internationale travaillant en Suisse a annoncé des traces de la «particule divine».

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Published on : 17 Dec 2011

Barbados Advocate - High cash returns with backyard gardens

A recent study performed by exchange students from McGill University on assignment at the Bellairs Research Institute has discovered the potential for high cash returns from the use of residential backyard organic farming.

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Published on : 10 Dec 2011

Toronto Star, UPI, et al. - Nanoscale electronic circuit developed

Canadian and U.S. researchers say they've engineered a minute electronic circuit, containing two wires separated by the distance of just 150 atoms.

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Published on : 08 Dec 2011