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McGill Conference: Muslim students weigh in on evolution

The Can$250,000 Islam and Evolution research project is the first large study of evolution in countries with significant Muslim populations. Results from the three-year project were presented at a symposium at McGill University in Montreal. The data could help teachers and students from diverse backgrounds work together better.

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Published on : 03 Apr 2009

McGill researchers squeeze light out of quantum dots

Physics breakthrough could lead to forward leaps in lasers, telecom and optical computing

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Published on : 03 Apr 2009

Kudos: Randy Auerbach, 2009 Distinguished Student Research Award in Clinical Psychology

Congratulations to Mr. Randy Auerbach, a doctoral student in the Psychology Department who will receive the 2009 Distinguished Student Research Award in Clinical Psychology from the Society of Clinical Psychology's Education & Training Committee, a division of the American Psychological Association.

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Published on : 23 Mar 2009

Islam and Evolution

How is evolution taught and understood in Islamic societies? How do Muslim students, parents, and teachers understand evolutionary science in relation to their religious beliefs?

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Published on : 19 Mar 2009

McGill physicist awarded Killam Research Fellowship

Robert Brandenberger wins coveted award from Canada Council for the Arts

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Published on : 12 Mar 2009

NSERC honours Professors Milner, Hendry, and Nader

Congratulations to Professors Brenda Milner, Karim Nader, and Andrew Hendry!

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Published on : 10 Mar 2009

Toxins in your fries?

Lab studies on animals have proven the carcinogenic properties of acrymalide, but McGill's Dr. Ariel Fenster explains that the animals used in the lab tests were exposed to high doses of acrymalide not comparable to typical amounts ingested by humans.

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Published on : 04 Mar 2009

Do antioxydants really help us live longer?

In the journal PLoS Genetics, biologist Siegfried Hekimi demonstrates that worms that have been genetically modified to be less effective at antioxydation -- the elimination of free radicals -- live just as long as regular worms. One of the modified worms actually lived longer than normal.

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Published on : 03 Mar 2009

Jurassic cluck

Jack Horner, the paleontologist whose career inspired the film Jurassic Park, is funding scientists on a quest he hopes will culminate in a fowl whose DNA has been "reverse-engineered" to make the bird more similar to its dinosaur ancestors. The work is carried out by Hans Larsson, a biologist at McGill University in Montreal, and Mary Schweitzer, a paleontologist at North Carolina University.

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Published on : 02 Mar 2009

Two McGill researchers garner prestigious Steacie Fellowships

Biologist Andrew Hendry and psychologist Karim Nader take two of six national fellowships

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Published on : 02 Mar 2009

To infinity and beyond: space, stars & the universe

All systems go for 2009 installment of astro-themed Mini-Science public lecture series

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Published on : 02 Mar 2009

What Darwin Didn't Know-- on the web

What Darwin Didn't Know, a presentation held at the Redpath Museum in honour of Darwin's bicentennary, was recorded live and archived on the World Wide Web. You can watch the presentation via the archive at: http://bcooltv.mcgill.ca/Viewer/?EventID=200902123549 Moderated by David Green, the Director of the Museum, the speakers included four evolutionary biologists from McGill.

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Published on : 28 Feb 2009

Peptides-on-demand: McGill researcher’s radical new green chemistry makes the impossible possible

Fast and simple “enabling technology” being offered to the world on open basis

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Published on : 24 Feb 2009

Guillaume Gervais, physicist

If you imagine a grain of sand and then divide that by a million, you'll have an idea of the size of a nanometer, a measurement of the infinitely small which excites the passions of physicist Guillaume Gervais. In his laboratory at McGill, the researcher opens his door to the cameras of "Québec scientifique".

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Published on : 17 Feb 2009

Cutting-edge optical laser technique promises to eliminate the need for slides, staining and microscopes

Paul Wiseman and his research team have developed a radically new technique that uses lasers and non-linear optical effects to detect malaria infection in human blood. The new technique promises simpler, faster and far less labour-intensive detection of the malaria parasite in blood samples.

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Published on : 17 Feb 2009