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Faculty of Science news

Harnessing the butterfly effect

The atmosphere is so unstable that a butterfly flapping its wings can, famously, change the course of weather patterns. The celebrated “butterfly effect” also means that the reliability of weather forecasts drops sharply beyond 10 days.

Published on : 18 Aug 2015

Cosmos, Joe Schwarcz Win Skeptics’ Critical Thinking Prize

  The 2014 Balles Prize in Critical Thinking, an award for excellence in the promotion of science and reason, was given this year to the creators, producers, and writers of Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey, and to Dr. Joe Schwarcz for his book Is That a Fact? The Balles Prize is given annually by the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry (CSI), publisher of the magazine Skeptical Inquirer.

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Published on : 09 Jul 2015

Could black phosphorus be the next silicon?

As scientists continue to hunt for a material that will make it possible to pack more transistors on a chip, new research from McGill University and Université de Montréal adds to evidence that black phosphorus could emerge as a strong candidate.

Published on : 07 Jul 2015

Convocation congratulations

On behalf of the Faculty of Science and on the occasion of Science Convocation ceremonies (June 2, 2015), Dean of Science Martin Grant offer congratulations to all graduating students, from bachelor's to doctoral, and also to the following prizewinners.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students, kudos
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Published on : 02 Jun 2015

New Dean of Science

Congratulations to Professor Bruce Lennox who will become the new Dean of the Faculty of Science, effective July 1, 2015. He is currently Tomlinson Professor of Chemistry, a former chair of the Department of Chemistry, and a leading nanoscientist. He will succeed Professor Martin Grant, who is finishing his second term as Dean of Science. More information.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
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Published on : 22 May 2015

A better way to build DNA scaffolds

Imagine taking strands of DNA – the material in our cells that determines how we look and function – and using it to build tiny structures that can deliver drugs to targets within the body or take electronic miniaturization to a whole new level.

Published on : 06 May 2015

Prof. Victoria Kaspi, 2015 Killam Prize for the Natural Sciences

Congratulations to Professor Victoria Kaspi in the Department of Physics, who was awarded the Killam Prize today. Valued at $100,000, this is one of Canada’s most prestigious awards for academic-career achievement. Vicky Kaspi is a world-renowned astrophysicist known for her cutting-edge work on neutron stars and pulsars.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students, kudos
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Published on : 14 Apr 2015

Vicky Kaspi wins 2015 Killam Prize in Natural Sciences

McGill professor Vicky Kaspi, a world-renowned astrophysicist known for her cutting-edge work on neutron stars and pulsars, was awarded the Killam Prize today, one of the country’s most prestigious awards for academic-career achievement. The $100,000 prize was granted for outstanding scholarship in the natural sciences. Five awards – one each in the categories of the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, health sciences and engineering -- are distributed every year by the Canada Council for the Arts.

Published on : 14 Apr 2015

Essay competition, apply by May 21: The Brain@McGill Prize for neuroscience undergraduate research

The Brain@McGill has established this award to recognize the importance of the next generation of promising young neuroscientists in advancing our understanding of the brain.  The winner of the Brain@McGill Prize for Neuroscience is awarded $500 and publication in B@M Online and newsletter.  The essay and those of the three semi-finalists will also be published in B@M Online.

Classified as : Students, neuroscience, sousa
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Published on : 10 Apr 2015

SURPASS Newsletter - Issue 4

“**NOTE: Open ASAP to read our course registration tips! Registration starts this week!

Classified as : Students, sousa, SURPASS
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Published on : 06 Apr 2015

Another step forward for green chemistry

A tiny bit of silver, combined with water and air, can convert aldehydes into acids efficiently -- instead of the classical methods using stoichiometric amounts of expensive or toxic metal oxidants, according to a new study by McGill University researchers.

Published on : 27 Mar 2015

Bash brothers of chemistry discover unusual material

The research group of Prof. Tomislav Friščić in McGill’s Department of Chemistry has made a name for itself in the little-known, but growing field of “mechanochemistry,” in which chemical transformations are produced by milling, grinding or shearing solid-state ingredients – brute force, in other words, rather than fancy liquid agents. “Your coffee maker grinds things,” and grinding molecules in the lab involves much the same principle, Friščić notes. Using mechanical force also has the significant advantage of avoiding the use of environmentally harmful bulk solvents.

Published on : 23 Mar 2015

The Food Babe Decoded

Vani Hari, who goes by the alias “The Food Babe” has become a real social phenomenon. She blogs, appears on TV and has just come out with a book that quickly made it to the New York Times best seller list. She has lots of followers and lots of critics, including myself. I don’t disagree with her goal of improving people’s eating habits. I just disagree with the methods used. Irrational fear-mongering is not the way to go. "There is just no acceptable level of any chemical to ingest, ever," she says.

Published on : 15 Mar 2015