Research

By Chris Chipello
Newsroom

Word-of-mouth recruitment is the most common way to fill jobs, and management scholars have long thought that this practice contributes to job segregation by gender: women tend to reach out to other women in their networks, and men do likewise.

Classified as: diversity, management, faculty of management, Organization Science, job segregation, society and culture, MIT Sloan School of Management, referral, job referral, gender de-segregation
Published on: 22 Jan 2016

By Vincent C. Allaire
Newsroom

Human genome editing for both research and therapy is progressing, raising ethical questions among scientists around the world.

Classified as: Bartha Knoppers, health and lifestyle, erika kleiderman, rosario isasi, gene editing, centre of genomics and policy, CRISPR
Published on: 21 Jan 2016

By Cynthia Lee

Some drug regimens, such as those designed to eliminate tumors, are notorious for nasty side effects. Unwanted symptoms are often the result of medicine going where it’s not needed and harming healthy cells. To minimize this risk, researchers in Quebec have developed nanoparticles that only release a drug when exposed to near-infrared light, which doctors could beam onto a specific site. Their report appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Classified as: Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Canada Research Chairs, infections, drug, health and lifestyle, tumor, Journal of the American Chemical Society, Marta Cerruti, UV light, Near-infrared, Canada Foundation for Innovation
Published on: 20 Jan 2016

By Chris Chipello, McGill Newsroom

Study by McGill researchers assesses short-run impacts on households, industries

The cost burden of Quebec’s carbon-pricing policy, is likely to be modest across income groups and industries, according to a McGill University research team.

Classified as: environment, energy, science and technology, carbon market, carbon, carbon price, greenhouse, gas emission, carbon efficiency, permits, subsidies, decarbonisation, price floor
Published on: 20 Jan 2016

Don't miss the January 15, 2016, edition of CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks to learn how Prof Jeff Bergthorson and colleagues are finding ways for energy to be stored and transported via iron and other metals, a novel and potentially important method for delivering fossil-fuel-free power.

Classified as: Sustainability, energy, engineering research, sustainable engineering, clean energy
Published on: 19 Jan 2016

By Katherine Gombay, McGill Newsroom

Failure to find active microbes in coldest Antarctic soils has implications for search for life on Mars

Classified as: NASA, Mars, Antarctic, Arctic, lyle whyte, science and technology, microbial life, permafrost soil, Phoenix landing site, ecosystem
Published on: 19 Jan 2016

Gold nanoparticles have unusual optical, electronic and chemical properties, which scientists are seeking to put to use in a range of new technologies, from nanoelectronics to cancer treatments.

Classified as: DNA, Nature Chemistry, optics, nanoparticles, gold, Hanadi Sleiman, nanoelectric, crystals, optoelectronics
Published on: 7 Jan 2016

By Katherine Gombay, McGill Newsroom

Arctic peoples inherently able to adapt given changes to various non-climatic factors

Classified as: environment, Geography, climate change, stress, James Ford, Nature Climate Change, science and technology, adaptation
Published on: 6 Jan 2016

Drought and extreme heat events slashed cereal harvests in recent decades by 9% to 10% on average in affected countries – and the impact of these weather disasters was greatest in the developed nations of North America, Europe and Australasia, according to a new study led by researchers from McGill University and the University of British Columbia.

Classified as: Sustainability, nature, farming, food and sustainability, drought, cereal, weather disaster, Navin Ramankutty, Pedram Rowhani
Published on: 6 Jan 2016

University of Toronto and McGill University scientists are leading an international partnership to discover new and improved drug treatments for tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases  -- thanks to a contribution from Merck Canada Inc., as well as an additional $5 million supplement to a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The new funding brings the total investment from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to nearly US $12 million since 2012.

Classified as: medicine, health, tuberculosis, university of toronto, drug, health and lifestyle, Malaria, tropical diseases, Merck Canada, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, cryptosporidiosis, protozoan
Published on: 17 Dec 2015

Now, an international team of researchers led by McMaster University in collaboration with the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre has found that soap and water is actually less effective than just using saline water.

The findings, which were published in the New England Journal of Medicine, could lead to significant cost savings, particularly in developing countries where open fractures are particularly common.

Classified as: water, World Health Organization, McMaster, McGill University Health Centre, health and lifestyle, salin, salin water, soap, wound, cleaning wounds, New England Journal of Medicine, Mohit Bhandari, Michael G. DeGroote, Edward Harvey
Published on: 15 Dec 2015

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