Research

By Maya-Olivia Eyssen, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital

Montreal high school students to take part in brain quiz.

Classified as: Brain Bee, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, contest, synapses, axons, cerebral, Canadian National Brain Bee, Neuroscience: Science of the Brain
Published on: 9 Mar 2016

By Chris Chipello, McGill Newsroom

Astronomers for the first time detect repeat ‘fast radio bursts’ from same sky location

Astronomers for the first time have detected repeating short bursts of radio waves from an enigmatic source that is likely located well beyond the edge of our Milky Way galaxy. The findings indicate that these “fast radio bursts” come from an extremely powerful object which occasionally produces multiple bursts in under a minute.

Classified as: Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, nature, Canada Research Chairs Program, science and technology, Victoria Kaspi, Fast Radio Bursts, radio waves, Milky Way, FRB, Paul Scholz, Arecibo radio telescope, McGill High Performance Computing Centre, Max Planck, Lorne Trottier Chair in Astrophysics & Cosmology, Fonds de recherche du Québec
Published on: 2 Mar 2016

By Katherine Gombay, McGill Newsroom

McGill is proud to announce that five researchers have been awarded over $2.4 million in NSERC Strategic Partnership Grants for 2016.

Classified as: award, NSERC, Strategic Partnership Grants
Published on: 1 Mar 2016

By Katherine Gombay, McGill Newsroom

The substance that provides energy to all the cells in our bodies, Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), may also be able to power the next generation of supercomputers.

Classified as: science, technology, Supercomputers, Dan Nicolau, PNAS, Nanoengineering, Department of Bioengineering
Published on: 26 Feb 2016

By Chris Chipello, McGill Newsroom

Surprisingly complex interactions between neurotransmitter receptors and other key proteins help explain the brain’s ability to process information with lightning speed, according to a new study.

Classified as: brain, Pharmacology, Derek Bowie, Alzheimer, neuron, Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), health and lifestyle, proteins, receptors, macromolecules, Philip Biggin
Published on: 25 Feb 2016

By Tod Hoffman, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research

The use of incretin-based drugs is not associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the latest issue of the British Medical Journal (BMJ).

The research was conducted by the Canadian Network for Observational Drug Effect Studies (CNODES), which used the health records of almost 1 million patients with types 2 diabetes.

Classified as: CIHR, faculty of medicine, health, Cancer, jewish general hospital, Samy Suissa, diabetes, health and lifestyle, health canada, pancreatic cancer, CNODES, drug safety
Published on: 22 Feb 2016

By Julie Robert, McGill University Health Centre

A research team, led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) in Montreal, has broken new ground in our understanding of the complex functioning of the brain.

Classified as: brain, injury, health, RI-MUHC, Movement, neurons, astrocytes, Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, health and lifestyle, Inez Jabalpurwala, Brain Canada Foundation, Weston Brain Institute
Published on: 18 Feb 2016

By Chris Chipello, McGill Newsroom

McGill researchers Elena Bennett and Yasser Gidi also honoured by NSERC

The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) has named McGill University astrophysicist Vicky Kaspi as this year’s recipient of the Gerhard Herzberg Canada Gold Medal for Science and Engineering, NSERC’s highest honour, in recognition of the excellence and influence of her research contributions.

Classified as: Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, astrophysics, elena bennett, neutron stars, pulsars, Vicky Kaspi, society and culture, Gerhard Herzberg Canada Gold Medal for Science and Engineering, Fast Radio Bursts, Yasser Gidi
Published on: 16 Feb 2016

By Cynthia Lee, McGill Newsroom

It’s not unusual for siblings to seem more dissimilar than similar: one becoming a florist, for example, another becoming a flutist, and another becoming a physicist.

Classified as: McGill University, DNA, disease, genes, diversity, bioengineering, health and lifestyle, proteins, brood, isoforms, human cells, splicing, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, Yu Xia
Published on: 11 Feb 2016

By Leilani Ku, Desautels Faculty of Management at McGill University

McGill University’s Desautels Faculty of Management is launching a new twelve-month Masters of Management in Finance (MMF).

Classified as: Desautels, Jan Ericsson, finance, masters, investing, society and culture, Banking, Risk management, Isabelle Bajeux
Published on: 11 Feb 2016

By Katherine Gombay, McGill Newsroom

If you’re fat, can you blame it on your genes? The answer is a qualified yes. Maybe. Under certain circumstances. Researchers are moving towards a better understanding of some of the roots of obesity.

Classified as: food, obesity, health, Laurette Dube, genes, income, eating habits, Fat, health and lifestyle, food and sustainability, skinny, healthy food, wealth, MAVAN birth cohort, JAMA Pediatrics
Published on: 9 Feb 2016

By Cynthia Lee

Newsroom

Everyone marches to the beat of their own drum: From walking to talking to producing music, different people’s movements occur at different speeds.

Classified as: music, Movement, caroline palmer, march, society and culture, beat, drum, speed, rhythm, coordination, Anna Zamm, Chelsea Wellman, Journal of Experimental Psychology
Published on: 9 Feb 2016

By Cynthia Lee

Newsroom

In real estate, location is key. It now seems the same concept holds true when it comes to stopping pain. New research published in Nature Communications indicates that the location of receptors that transmit pain signals is important in how big or small a pain signal will be -- and therefore how effectively drugs can block those signals.

Classified as: Canadian Institutes of Health Research, pain, chronic pain, Nature Communications, health and lifestyle, spinal cord, painful stimulus, Pain treatment, glutamate receptors, National Institutes of Health, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council
Published on: 3 Feb 2016

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