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Some morbidly obese people are missing genes, new research shows

A small but significant proportion of morbidly obese people are missing a section of their DNA, according to research published today in Nature.

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Published on : 03 Feb 2010

Parkinson’s disease research uncovers social barrier

People with Parkinson’s disease suffer social difficulties simply because of the way they talk, a McGill University researcher has discovered. Marc Pell, at McGill’s School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, has learned that many people develop negative impressions about individuals with Parkinson’s disease, based solely on how they communicate.

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Published on : 03 Feb 2010

Good Ethics for Good Science

The accelerated world of medical research promises new diagnostic tools and treatments for Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, and even cancer. These advances, however, raise a daunting array of ethical issues. Enter Bartha Maria Knoppers, the recently appointed director of McGill’s new Centre of Genomics and Policy.

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Published on : 02 Feb 2010

Balzan for Milner

Brenda Milner needs a bigger mantelpiece. On November 20, 2009, in a ceremony held in Berne, Switzerland, the legendary Montreal Neurological Institute researcher received the International Balzan Prize, yet another entry on her long list of prestigious accolades.

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Published on : 02 Feb 2010

Home of the Cosmic Rays

Scientists long tried to figure out why some spots on Earth had more radioactive air than others. It wasn’t until 1912, when Victor Hess took an electrometer skyward in a balloon, that it became clear the extra radiation was coming, not from inside the Earth, but from above it. Way above it. But where exactly did these “cosmic rays,” as physicist Robert Millikan dubbed them, come from?

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Published on : 02 Feb 2010

Royal Society Honours

At ceremonies held in Ottawa on November 28 and 29, 2009, the Royal Society of Canada recognized the achievements of four McGill researchers.

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Published on : 02 Feb 2010

The Dangers of Drinking

Bertrand Russell once described drunkenness as “temporary suicide,” a phrase that might turn out to be more literally true than the great philosopher knew. Heavy drinkers of beer and spirits face a much higher risk of developing cancer than the population at large, according to a recent study published in the journal Cancer Detection and Prevention by researchers from McGill and elsewhere.

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Published on : 02 Feb 2010

Gold-en Hall of Fame

Dr. Phil Gold made Canadian medical history in 1965—and now it’s official. Forty-five years after he and his colleague Dr. Samuel Freedman discovered the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)—which, as the first clinically useful human tumour marker, revolutionized the diagnosis and management of cancer—Gold is being inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.

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Published on : 02 Feb 2010

Double agent: glial cells can protect or kill neurons, vision

Scientists have identified a double agent in the eye that, once triggered, can morph from neuron protector to neuron killer. The discovery has significant health implications since the neurons killed through this process results in vision loss and blindness.

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Published on : 01 Feb 2010

Research breakthrough could lead to new treatment for malaria

Malaria causes more than two million deaths each year, but an expert multinational team battling the global spread of drug-resistant parasites has made a breakthrough in the search for better treatment.

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Published on : 28 Jan 2010

Walkerton Tragedy: 10 years of research leads to breakthrough

Studies of the victims of the Walkerton, Ont. tainted drinking water tragedy have led researchers to discover DNA variations in genes that increase the risk of developing post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS). The sheer scale of infection and the recording of the health of Walkerton’s citizens gave a team of researchers a unique opportunity to study the origin of this disorder.

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Published on : 27 Jan 2010

70% of Inuit preschoolers live in food-insecure homes: McGill researchers

Seventy per cent of Inuit preschoolers in Nunavut, Canada’s largest territory, live in households where there isn’t enough food, a situation with implications for children’s academic and psychosocial development, found McGill University Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair Grace Egeland of the Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment and collaborators.

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Published on : 25 Jan 2010

Retail meat linked to urinary tract infections: strong new evidence

McGill researcher discovers strong evidence of link between eating contaminated chicken and the E. coli that cause urinary tract infection

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Published on : 20 Jan 2010

McGill-CHUM study: 56 per cent of young adults in a new sexual relationship infected with HPV

A groundbreaking study of couples, led by Professor Eduardo Franco found more than half (56 per cent) of young adults in a new sexual relationship were infected with human papillomavirus (HPV).

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Published on : 14 Jan 2010