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2013 Cundill Prize in Historical Literature

McGill University’s Faculty of Arts unveiled today the six books shortlisted for the 2013 Cundill Prize in Historical Literature. The jury selected the works from 116 titles published all over the globe. The prize, now in its sixth year, features a $75,000 U.S. grand prize, making the Cundill Prize the world’s most lucrative international award for a nonfiction book.

Classified as : External
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Published on : 26 Sep 2013

Heart attacks in young women - not all have chest pain

Chest pain is recognized as a symptom of heart troubles, but one out of five women aged 55 years or less having a heart attack do not experience this symptom, according to a study led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC). The research findings, gathered from partner institutions across Canada including the University of British Columbia (UBC), are the first to describe this phenomenon in young women. The study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, has implications for emergency room healthcare professionals and for at-risk individuals, as seconds matter when it comes to the accurate diagnosis and treatment of heart attack.

Classified as : External
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Published on : 23 Sep 2013

McGill receives $1.5-million gift to bolster humanities

What role does science play in influencing climate change beliefs among indigenous people? How did the United States conceive and execute its plan for post-World War II relief? And in what ways have movement, performance and subjectivity impacted the art of dance in Quebec? These are just some of the fascinating questions that have been explored by leading researchers at McGill University through the Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship Program in the Humanities, established in 2008 thanks to the generosity of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Classified as : External, humanities research
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Published on : 19 Sep 2013

How birds got their wings

Birds originated from a group of small, meat-eating theropod dinosaurs called maniraptorans sometime around 150 million years ago. Recent findings from around the world show that many maniraptorans were very bird-like, with feathers, hollow bones, small body sizes and high metabolic rates. 

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Published on : 17 Sep 2013

McGill statement on proposed charter of values

In response to the current debate about the direction of the Quebec government on a future charter of values, Prof. Suzanne Fortier, Principal and Vice-Chancellor, affirms that the right of religious choice and cultural diversity are essential values for the McGill community.

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Published on : 17 Sep 2013

Building bridges across the Pacific

Last year, more than 800 Chinese students crossed the Pacific to attend McGill, making China the third largest source of international students for the University, behind only the United States and France.  And that number is growing every year; in fact, it has more than doubled since 2007.

Classified as : External, Li Ka Shing
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Published on : 12 Sep 2013

Beijing clean-water program offers lessons for cities

The brown, smog-filled skies that engulf Beijing have earned China a poor reputation for environmental stewardship. But a study by an international and interdisciplinary team of environmental scientists, including McGill University’s Brian Robinson, has found that a government-run clean water program is providing substantial benefit to millions of people in the nation's capital. 

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Published on : 12 Sep 2013

McGill among top 25 universities for 10th year

McGill University has placed among the top 25 universities globally for the tenth consecutive year, ranking 21st in the 2013 QS World University Rankings.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students, QS, rankings
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Published on : 09 Sep 2013

How to map cell-signaling molecules to their targets

A team of University of Montreal and McGill University researchers have devised a method to identify how signaling molecules orchestrate the sequential steps in cell division. In an article published online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the scientists explain how they could track the relationship between signaling molecules and their target molecules to establish where, when and how the targets are deployed to perform the many steps necessary to replicate an individual cell’s genome and surrounding structures.

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Published on : 09 Sep 2013

DNA ‘cages’ may aid drug delivery

Nanoscale “cages” made from strands of DNA can encapsulate small-molecule drugs and release them in response to a specific stimulus, McGill University researchers report in a new study.

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Published on : 03 Sep 2013

Morphing manganese

An often-overlooked form of manganese, an element critical to many life processes, is far more prevalent in ocean environments than previously known, according to a study by U.S. and Canadian researchers published this week in Science.

Classified as : External, ocean, manganese
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Published on : 23 Aug 2013

Putting sleep disorders to bed

Overnight flights across the Atlantic, graveyard shifts, stress-induced insomnia are all prime culprits in keeping us from getting a good night’s sleep. Thanks to new research from McGill University and Concordia University, however, these common sleep disturbances may one day be put to bed.

Classified as : External, sleep, circadian clock
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Published on : 21 Aug 2013

A new role for sodium in the brain

Researchers at McGill University have found that sodium – the main chemical component in table salt – is a unique “on/off” switch for a major neurotransmitter receptor in the brain. This receptor, known as the kainate receptor, is fundamental for normal brain function and is implicated in numerous diseases, such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain.

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Published on : 20 Aug 2013