Quick Links

Dept. of Natural Resource Sciences news

WHY DON'T WE JUST GET RID OF MOSQUITOES ALTOGETHER?

  With peak biting season for mosquitoes just around the corner, many of us might be tempted to wonder why don't we just get rid of the darn things altogether.Mosquitoes, after all, are attracted to many of the same things that attract humans during the summer months. "If you're outside having a barbecue with a bunch of friends, that's just a welcome sign for mosquitoes," said Chris Cloutier, a naturalist at the Morgan Aboretum.

Published on : 07 Jun 2016

WANTED: PLAIN TALK FROM THE LAB

  Excitement was in the air last May at a glitzy Toronto reception for “rockstar” professionals not accustomed to glitz: research scientists from six Canadian universities... At McGill University, insect scientist Chris Buddle submitted one study to a journal in “more of a casual, non-jargony language, (trying) to write it in a way that’s a bit more engaging, and not the typical dry scientific writing.” The Ottawa Citizen    

Published on : 18 Apr 2016

EXOMARS OUTBOUND IN SEARCH FOR LIFE SIGNS

  Professor Lyle White, Natural Resource Sciences, is interviewed on his role in Mars exploration and the Exomars Space Probe. Listen to the interview      

Published on : 22 Mar 2016

The lack of women in science: 'A wicked problem,' McGill's Elena Bennett says

  "The discussion started at my book club, but it might as well have started with Adam and Eve. We read The Awakening, a 1899 novel by Kate Chopin that describes the fight by a young woman, Edna Pontellier, for independence against the conventions of the time. We are all married working mothers. No matter how far society has come from Edna’s, most of us find the bulk of child care and the more banal duties of running a household fall to us. We felt for Edna.

Published on : 17 Feb 2016

Hot off the press! Macdonald Professor Recipient of Prestigious Steacie Fellowship

Professor Elena Bennett, of the Department of Natural Resource Sciences and the McGill School of Environment, is the recipient of a E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fellowship! The Fellowships are awarded by NSERC to enhance the career development of outstanding and highly promising university faculty who are earning a strong international reputation for original research.

Published on : 16 Feb 2016

Antarctic permafrost may not be habitable for microbes – So is Mars?

  "It doesn't mean there's no life on Mars, but what it does mean is it's going to be harder to find," said Jacqueline Goordial, the McGill University researcher who led the study, in an interview with Rachelle Solomon on CBC's Breakaway.

Published on : 25 Jan 2016

Nearing the limits of life on Earth

Failure to find active microbes in coldest Antarctic soils has implications for search for life on Mars Natural Resource Sciences professor Lyle Whyte and postdoctoral fellow Jackie Goordial talk about their research which suggests that it is unlikely that it is unlikely that there is any microbial life to be found on Mars.

Published on : 19 Jan 2016

Nearing the limits of life on Earth

By Katherine Gombay, McGill Newsroom Failure to find active microbes in coldest Antarctic soils has implications for search for life on Mars

Published on : 19 Jan 2016

Refining the Search for Life on Mars

  The results of a recent experiment at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) synchrotron in Saskatoon could be a key piece in the quest to discover if there was ever life on Mars. Lyle Whyte, an environmental microbiologist at McGill University who is originally from Saskatchewan, specializes in organisms that can survive in extreme cold. Read article in the Saskatoon StarPhoenix  

Published on : 21 Dec 2015

Pesticides: more toxic than previously thought?

Insecticides that are sprayed in orchards and fields across North America may be more toxic to spiders than scientists previously believed.

Published on : 06 Aug 2015

The personalities of spiders

Even jumping spiders have personalities scientists have discovered. A "shy" individual will not make the same choices as a "bold" individual. This means that some individuals, because of their personality type, will capture more prey than others, and will therefore have a larger effect on local ecosystems.

Published on : 06 Aug 2015