MNI

Discovery points to possible target for cancer drugs

McGill University researchers have discovered a mechanism through which mitochondria, the energy factory of our body’s cells, play a role in preventing cells from dying when the cells are deprived of nutrients – a finding that points to a potential target for next-generation cancer drugs.

The research, published in Molecular Cell, builds on previous work by McGill professor Nahum Sonenberg, one of the senior authors of the new study.

Classified as: Heidi McBride, mitochondria
Published on: 22 Sep 2017

Research symposium, public education event and ALS walk planned

Multiple events planned for this week will help educate the public about amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a devastating disease that still has no cure.

Classified as: ALS research, ALS, ALS awareness, Research symposium, ALS walk, Neuro, Dr. Angela Genge, ALS Society of Quebec
Published on: 13 Sep 2017

Society recognizes scholarly, research and artistic excellence.

Congratulations to Dr. Edith Hamel and Dr. Robert Zatorre, who have been elected Fellows of the Royal Society of Canada. Election to the academies of the Royal Society of Canada is the highest honour a scholar can achieve in the Arts, Humanities and Sciences.

Classified as: edith hamel, Robert Zatorre, royal society of canada, rsc
Published on: 7 Sep 2017

The Neuro to launch open research publishing platform with F1000

A new partnership between The Neuro and F1000 will create a publishing platform for researchers that will speed the progress of neuroscience discovery.

The Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University (The Neuro) is partnering with F1000, a provider of support services for researchers, institutes and funders, to create a new open research publishing platform called MNI Open Research (https://mniopenresearch.org).

Classified as: F1000, Research, open science, Publishing
Published on: 30 Aug 2017
The origins of autism remain mysterious. What areas of the brain are involved, and when do the first signs appear? New findings published in Biological Psychiatry bring us closer to understanding the pathology of autism, and the point at which it begins to take shape in the human brain. Such knowledge will allow earlier interventions in the future and better outcomes for autistic children.
 
Classified as: autism, Ludmer Centre, montreal neurological centre, The Neuro, Research
Published on: 29 Aug 2017

Abnormalities shown to first appear in brain networks involved in sensory processing

The origins of autism remain mysterious. What areas of the brain are involved, and when do the first signs appear? New findings published in Biological Psychiatry brings us closer to understanding the pathology of autism, and the point at which it begins to take shape in the human brain. Such knowledge will allow earlier interventions in the future and better outcomes for autistic children.

Classified as: autism, IBIS, Alan Evans, John Lewis, Ludmer Centre, ASD
Published on: 29 Aug 2017

For people suffering from depression, a day without treatment can seem like a lifetime. A new study explains why the most commonly prescribed antidepressants can take as long as six weeks to have an effect. The findings could one day lead to more effective and faster acting drugs.

Classified as: Antidepressants, depression, SSRIs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, cholecystokinin cells, CCK, hippocampus, Adrien Peyrache, Paul Greengard, Rockefeller University, McGill University
Published on: 3 Aug 2017

Researchers train brains to use different regions for same task

Practice might not always make perfect, but it’s essential for learning a sport or a musical instrument. It's also the basis of brain training, an approach that holds potential as a non-invasive therapy to overcome disabilities caused by neurological disease or trauma.

Research at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University (The Neuro) has shown just how adaptive the brain can be, knowledge that could one day be applied to recovery from conditions such as stroke.

Classified as: brain research, brain plasticity, Dave Liu, Christopher Pack, area MT
Published on: 19 Jul 2017

Researchers develop method that could one day be used in brain trauma lawsuits

 

Lawyers representing both sides in concussion lawsuits against sports leagues may eventually have a new tool at their disposal: a diagnostic signature that uses artificial intelligence to detect brain trauma years after it has occurred. 

Classified as: Concussion, Athletics, Sports, hockey, football, Sébastien Tremblay, Ludmer Centre, MRI
Published on: 12 Jul 2017

The Tenaquip Foundation donation will allow for faster drug development, better care for ALS patients

 

A generous donation by The Tenaquip Foundation will improve the quality of care available to ALS patients at The Neuro, and increase the rate at which researchers can evaluate new ALS drugs.

Classified as: ALS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Reed Family, Tenaquip Foundation, clinical trial unit, drug development, Angela Genge, Guy Rouleau
Published on: 3 Jul 2017

Canadian researchers have invented an intraoperative probe that reliably detects multiple types of tumour cells 

Patients with common widespread forms of cancer will enjoy longer life expectancy and reduced risk of recurrence thanks to a multimodal optical spectroscopy probe developed by Canadian researchers. 

Classified as: brain cancer, Cancer, probe, Kevin Petrecca, Frederic Leblond, brain tumour
Published on: 28 Jun 2017

Different forms of memory exist in the same neuron and can be manipulated separately

 

Scientists have known for some time that a memory is stored in the brain through changes in the strength of particular synapses, the structures that pass signals between neurons. However, how the change in strength persisted remained a mystery. Solving this mystery has important implications for remedying neurological and psychological disorders.

Classified as: Wayne Sossin, memory, PKM, Columbia, Todd Sacktor, Samuel Schacher
Published on: 27 Jun 2017

Neuronavigation allows more accurate catheter placements, less surgical complications

Traumatic brain injury is a life-threatening condition that requires fast and accurate intervention. A protocol for a new tool developed by Medtronic Navigation with the help of researchers at the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) is allowing surgeons to deliver better care than ever.

Published on: 13 Jun 2017

Much work to be done to improve diagnosis and treatment

When NHL star player Sidney Crosby suffered a concussion during a game in May – the fourth concussion of his career – the news made nationwide headlines. A few years earlier, a concussion had kept the Pittsburgh Penguins star off the ice for ten months.

Concussions can have serious consequences, even in cases where the victim shows few symptoms immediately. Victims often shrug off a mild blow to the head, unaware that brain damage has occurred.

Classified as: mental health, MNI, Neuro, Neurology, medicine research, football, Sports, concussions
Published on: 7 Jun 2017

ALS takes away the patient’s motor functions one at a time, and the progress of finding effective drugs to counter its insidious effects has been slow. June is ALS Month, a good time to update the public on the latest developments in ALS research taking place at The Neuro.

The Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro) is recognized as a leading Canadian centre for research into amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) as well as for its care of ALS patients.

Classified as: Guy Rouleau, ALS, Peter McPherson, Angela Genge, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, C9ORF72, Heidi McBride, Eric Shoubridge, Hiroshi Tsuda, Rami Massie, Heather Durham, Gary Armstrong, zebrafish
Published on: 2 Jun 2017

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