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Provocative new Montreal study probes link between breast cancer and air pollution

Air pollution has already been linked to a range of health problems. Now, a ground-breaking new study suggests pollution from traffic may put women at risk for another deadly disease.

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Published on : 06 Oct 2010

Bedouin tribe reveals secrets to McGill's GA-JOE

As part of McGill's "RaDiCAL" project (Rare Disease Consortium for Autosomal Loci), collaborators in Qatar conducted field research with three patients from biologically interrelated Bedouin families, and sent samples to Canada for analysis by GA JOE – a high-tech genome analyzing machine.

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Published on : 01 Oct 2010

An innovative medical education program in Outaouais: integrated externship

The Outaouais Health Campus, McGill University and their partners are happy to announce the inauguration of a new decentralized predoctoral medical education program: integrated externship. The first cohort, composed of nine students, arrived this August to pursue their medical education. The program combines clinical exposure, teaching and learning by clinical reasoning.

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Published on : 30 Sep 2010

Your body recycling itself – captured on film

Proteins are made up of a chain of amino acids, and scientists have known since the 1980s that first one in the chain determines the lifetime of a protein. McGill researchers have finally discovered how the cell identifies this first amino acid – and caught it on camera.

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Published on : 13 Sep 2010

World’s first transcontinental anesthesia

Videoconferences may be known for putting people to sleep, but never like this. Dr. Thomas Hemmerling and his team of McGill’s Department of Anesthesia achieved a world first on August 30, 2010, when they treated patients undergoing thyroid gland surgery in Italy remotely from Montreal.

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Published on : 10 Sep 2010

New study investigates use of soy-rich diet for preventing chronic pain after breast cancer surgery

A breakthrough study focusing on the benefits of soy in the prevention of chronic pain after breast cancer surgery has been launched by researchers at the Alan Edwards Pain Management Unit of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) and McGill University.

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Published on : 01 Sep 2010

A breakthrough in tuberculosis research

“It’s a global health disaster waiting to happen, even here in Canada, but this new paradigm in TB research may offer an immediate opportunity to improve vaccination and treatment initiatives,” explains Dr. Maziar Divangahi

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Published on : 29 Jul 2010

$300,000 CIHR grant awarded to Medicago, the Research Institute of the MUHC and McGill University

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research have awarded a $300,000 grant for research focusing on the nature of the immune response induced by the action mechanisms of plant-made Virus-Like Particles to Dr. Louis Vezina, Chief Scientific Officer of Medicago and to Dr. Brian Ward and Dr. Ciriaco Piccirillo of the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre and McGill University.

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Published on : 01 Mar 2010

McGill discovery offers hope in diabetes

Another step on the road to a cure for diabetes may give hope to the world’s 171 million diabetes sufferers, thanks to collaboration between teams from McGill University and the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF).

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Published on : 10 Feb 2010

Parkinson’s disease research uncovers social barrier

People with Parkinson’s disease suffer social difficulties simply because of the way they talk, a McGill University researcher has discovered. Marc Pell, at McGill’s School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, has learned that many people develop negative impressions about individuals with Parkinson’s disease, based solely on how they communicate.

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Published on : 03 Feb 2010

Gold-en Hall of Fame

Dr. Phil Gold made Canadian medical history in 1965—and now it’s official. Forty-five years after he and his colleague Dr. Samuel Freedman discovered the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)—which, as the first clinically useful human tumour marker, revolutionized the diagnosis and management of cancer—Gold is being inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.

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Published on : 02 Feb 2010

Double agent: glial cells can protect or kill neurons, vision

Scientists have identified a double agent in the eye that, once triggered, can morph from neuron protector to neuron killer. The discovery has significant health implications since the neurons killed through this process results in vision loss and blindness.

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Published on : 01 Feb 2010

Research breakthrough could lead to new treatment for malaria

Malaria causes more than two million deaths each year, but an expert multinational team battling the global spread of drug-resistant parasites has made a breakthrough in the search for better treatment.

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Published on : 28 Jan 2010

Vitamin D supplements could fight Crohn's disease

A new study has found that Vitamin D, readily available in supplements or cod liver oil, can counter the effects of Crohn’s disease. John White, an endocrinologist at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, led a team of scientists who present their findings about the inflammatory bowel disease in the latest Journal of Biological Chemistry.

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Published on : 27 Jan 2010

Walkerton Tragedy: 10 years of research leads to breakthrough

Studies of the victims of the Walkerton, Ont. tainted drinking water tragedy have led researchers to discover DNA variations in genes that increase the risk of developing post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS). The sheer scale of infection and the recording of the health of Walkerton’s citizens gave a team of researchers a unique opportunity to study the origin of this disorder.

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Published on : 27 Jan 2010