Health and medicine

The McGill Division of Cancer Epidemiology has recently launched the CATCH study to test the effectiveness of a Carrageenan-based gel in preventing the tranmission of HPV. Carrageenan is derived from red algae, and commonly used as a thickening agent in food products. It could represent an inexpensive method of prevention against the virus, whereas the vaccine and screening procedures are considerably more expensive.

Classified as: women, health, Cancer, HPV, CATCH, lubricant, safe, sex, studies, study, Carrageenan, epidemiology, woman, STI
Published on: 25 Mar 2013

Vitamin B12 deficiency: tracking the genetic causes

Published on: 28 Aug 2012

In a new study, researchers have uncovered fresh evidence of a genetic predisposition to eating disorders that is passed on from mothers to daughters.

Published on: 26 Aug 2012

Selected by Travel & Leisure magazine as one of the world's most beautiful universities… McGill’s 79-acre campus, punctuated by a series of pavilions that were built over hundreds of years, has a unified design derived from the college’s Scottish roots (the school was founded by Scottish trader James McGill in 1821).

Published on: 24 Aug 2012

Discovery has implications for cancer and diabetes research

Published on: 15 Aug 2012

McGill researchers uncover crucial link between hippocampus and prefrontal cortex

Published on: 14 Aug 2012

Caffeine may ease Parkinson's symptoms

Published on: 2 Aug 2012

New cause of child blindness identified

Published on: 30 Jul 2012

We’ve known for a while that the vestibular system in the inner ear is responsible for helping us keep our balance. And while researchers have already developed a basic understanding of how the brain constructs our perceptions of ourselves in motion, until now no one has understood the crucial step by which the neurons in the brain select the information needed to do so.

Published on: 24 Jul 2012

A study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal finds that uncircumcised boys have a higher risk of urinary tract infection (UTI) than circumcised boys, a condition that could lead to kidney damage and scarring if left untreated. The risk of infection was higher in uncircumcised boys regardless of how much of their urethral opening was visible.

Published on: 9 Jul 2012

A new study published in the journal Arthritis Care & Research, led by Dr. Mary-Ann Fitzcharles, a rheumatologist at the McGill University Health Centre, reveals that 13 per cent of FM patients use cannabinoids for relief from symptoms such as widespread pain, fatigue, and insomnia.

Published on: 22 Jun 2012

Pages