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Beyond McGill news

Two McGill profs appointed to the Order of Canada

A pair of McGill's finest receive Canada's greatest civilian honour.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Published on : 24 Jan 2008

Headliners: Walking, wildlife, and worried rats

Walkies everyone, science superstars and lessons learned from trees.

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Published on : 24 Jan 2008

Notes from the Field: Sharks of the shallows

A PhD candidate in the Department of Biology, Joseph DiBattista recounts his wild adventure catching and tagging sharks in Florida.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Published on : 24 Jan 2008

McGill Expert Alert: Heart Month/Valentine’s Day

With February being Heart Month and St. Valentine’s Day celebrated on February 14, we suggest the following experts on timely topics ranging from heart health to the chemistry of love:

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Published on : 21 Jan 2008

Mangled forests reborn

Ten years after nature unleashed its savagery on Quebec's hardwood forest, experts have discovered heartening news: The forest is doing just fine. "The incredible resilience of the forest gives me hope," says Martin Lechowicz, a professor of biology at McGill and director of the university's Gault Nature Reserve at Mont St. Hilaire. At 1,000 hectares, it is the largest forest in southern Quebec never to have been harvested.

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Published on : 14 Jan 2008

Memories of the deep freeze

Ten years after being clobbered by the legendary ice storm of 1998, tales of altruism and good deeds at McGill still ring true.

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Published on : 10 Jan 2008

Ain't no million-dollar baby

She's petite (48 kilograms) but she packs a heck of a wallop. She's master's chem student Tatiana Vassilieff and she's the newly crowned world savate champion.

Published on : 10 Jan 2008

Headliners: Barack, borders and beating stress

From south of the border primary analysis to globalization only partially realized.

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Published on : 10 Jan 2008

P.O.V.: Preserving the reserve

The Director of the Gault Nature Reserve tells us of the gift that forever changed McGill's topography.

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Published on : 10 Jan 2008

The rain falls mainly on the Himalayas

Rain on his parade and Shiv Prasher is one happy researcher.

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Published on : 10 Jan 2008

The musical brain

When he came to Montreal in July for a reunion with the Police, Sting met with McGill neuroscientist and best-selling author of "This is Your Brain on Music," Daniel Levitin.

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Published on : 07 Jan 2008

The Iowa caucuses

Presidential expert and McGill history professor Gil Troy provides analysis of the U.S. presidential race in a series for La Presse, beginning with the Iowa caucuses.


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Published on : 07 Jan 2008

Paris Hilton: Actress, author... analgesic?

Neuroscientists have found that a cardboard cutout of the ubiquitous Hilton Hotel heiress has a painkilling effect on mice. Jeffrey Mogil of McGill and his colleagues noticed that male mice showed signs of less pain when a scientist was present, so, to investigate whether it was the sight or smell of a human that caused the effect, the researchers acquired a promotional cardboard cutout of Hilton. Paris's effect appeared to be gender-specific. Male mice spent less time licking their wounds when fake Paris was in sight, but females showed no such effect. When the team put up a screen to block the rodents' view, the effect went away. The researchers reported at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience.

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Published on : 10 Dec 2007

Wonder pigs

Researchers at McGill say they have achieved a Canadian first by successfully producing three litters of cloned pigs, an event that may help advance research into human ailments such as diabetes. "It gives us the opportunity to create animals from cell lines that can be easily manipulated in vitro," said Dr. Vilceu Bordignon, director of the Large Animal Research Unit at McGill's Macdonald campus. "It could even lead to the development of new cell therapies for genetic diseases in humans."

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Published on : 06 Dec 2007

Notes from the Field: Never turn your back on a motorcycle

Dateline: New Delhi, India. Our intrepid reporter tracks down Madhav Badami as he takes on the problem of India's ever-growing transportation nightmare.

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Published on : 06 Dec 2007