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Combined radiation and chemotherapy increases breast cancer survival

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Published: 25 Jan 2005

For patients with high-risk breast cancer treated with radical mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy, the addition of radiation therapy leads to better survival outcomes with few long-term toxic effects.

Adding radiation therapy to chemotherapy improves survival in patients with high-risk breast cancer

For patients with high-risk breast cancer treated with radical mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy, the addition of radiation therapy leads to better survival outcomes with few long-term toxic effects, according to a 20-year follow-up of a randomized trial, which appears in the January 19 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

The British Columbia randomized radiation therapy trial was designed to determine the effect on survival of the addition of locoregional radiation therapy (radiation to the lymph nodes and chest wall) to a course of chemotherapy after radical mastectomy in premenopausal women with lymph node-positive breast cancer. Between 1979 and 1986, 318 patients were randomly assigned to receive no radiation therapy or to receive radiation. A 15-year follow-up found that radiation therapy was associated with improved breast cancer survival but not with overall survival.

In this 20-year follow-up of the British Columbia trial, Joseph Ragaz, MD, of McGill University Health Centre in Montreal, and colleagues found that the chemotherapy and radiation regimen, compared with chemotherapy alone, was associated with improvement in all end points analyzed. This included a 32% reduction in breast cancer mortality and a 27% reduction in overall mortality compared with chemotherapy alone. In addition, long-term toxic effects, including cardiac deaths, were acceptable for both groups of patients.

"Our results, and those from other groups, confirm that in situations where residual disease remains, adjuvant chemotherapy alone in high-risk breast cancer patients is suboptimal and that the addition of locoregional radiation therapy is important to achieve the highest cure rate," the authors write.

In an editorial, Timothy Whelan, BM, BCh, and Mark Levine, MD, of the Juravinski Cancer Centre in Hamilton, Ontario, discuss the use of locoregional radiation therapy in breast cancer patients and note that fewer clinicians accept its use in moderate-risk patients. "Because uncertainties continue about the effectiveness of locoregional radiation therapy after mastectomy in moderate-risk patients, we strongly urge that a randomized controlled trial be mounted to resolve these uncertainties," they write.

Contacts:

  • Article: Seeta Ramdass, Public Relations and Communications, McGill University Health Centre, 514-843-1560, seeta [dot] ramdas [at] muhc [dot] mcgill [dot] ca
  • Editorial: Veronica McGuire, Community & Media Relations, McMaster University, 905-525-9140 ext. 22169, vmcguir [at] mcmaster [dot] ca

Citations:

  • Article: Ragaz J, Olivotto IA, Spinelli JJ, Phillips N, Jackson SM, Wilson KS, et al. Locoregional Radiation Therapy in Patients With High-Risk Breast Cancer Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy: 20-Year Results of the British Columbia Randomized Trial. J Natl Cancer Inst 2004;97:116–26.
  • Editorial: Whelan T, Levine M. More Evidence That Locoregional Radiation Therapy Improves Survival: What Should We Do? J Natl Cancer Inst 2004;97:82–4.

Note: The Journal of the National Cancer Institute is published by Oxford University Press and is not affiliated with the National Cancer Institute. Attribution to the Journal of the National Cancer Institute is requested in all news coverage. Visit the Journal online at http://jncicancerspectrum.oupjournals.org/.

Contact Information

Contact: Sarah L. Zielinski
Organization: Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Email:
Office Phone: 301-841-1287
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