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Canadian National-Pratt-Grinstad Chair in Information Studies

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Published: 30 Apr 1999

The McGill Graduate School of Library and Information Studies' Dr Andrew Large has been appointed to the newly created Canadian National-Pratt-Grinstad Chair in Information Studies.

Another first for McGill University

The Graduate School of Library and Information Studies at McGill University is pleased to announce that Dr Andrew Large has been appointed to the newly created Canadian National-Pratt-Grinstad Chair in Information Studies.

The Chair is the first of its kind in Canada, and represents a major step for the School as an internationally recognized centre for research and teaching in the vital field of information studies into the next century. The Graduate School’s Director, Dr Jamshid Beheshti, said: "To have the interest and support of the Canadian National Railway Company and other generous individuals is most gratifying. It conveys the confidence of the corporate community in our work and the importance of information studies in contemporary society."

Canadian National pledged its support for the establishment of a chair in response to McGill’s Twenty-First Century Fund appeal in 1995. The company has long played an important role in the development of communications throughout Canada, and it is fitting that its name now should be associated in perpetuity with a chair in the field of information studies.

Phebe Pratt was the daughter of the construction magnate who built Toronto’s Royal York Hotel and Montreal’s Church of St. Andrew and St. Paul. She graduated from McGill with a Bachelor of Library Science in 1939. Following the Second World War she lectured at the McGill Library School and actively supported various libraries in Montreal. Mrs. Pratt died in 1983, generously bequeathing to the (then) Graduate School of Library Science a significant endowment.

These two gifts have recently been combined with a second bequest to the University from Sif Viveke Grinstad, a resident of London, Ont. Although she had no formal relationship to McGill, Miss Grinstad believed in the University’s capacity to initiate change, and her contribution lends support to this notable collective achievement. Therefore, a combination of these three exceptional gifts with one common inspiration has created the Canadian National - Pratt - Grinstad Chair in Information Studies.

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