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vitamin D

Less body fat for toddlers taking vitamin D

Mon, 2016-05-02 10:49

 

Supplement given during first year of life critical for muscle-mass development

A healthy intake of vitamin D in the first year of life appears to set children up to have more muscle mass and less body fat as toddlers, according to a new study published in the journal Pediatric Obesity.

The findings emerged from research initially aimed at confirming the importance of vitamin D for bone density. The additional benefit in terms of body composition came as a surprise for the research team.

Source Site: /macdonald

Less body fat for toddlers taking vitamin D

Mon, 2016-05-02 10:12

By Fergus Grieve, McGill Newsroom

Supplement given during first year of life critical for muscle-mass development

A healthy intake of vitamin D in the first year of life appears to set children up to have more muscle mass and less body fat as toddlers, according to a new study published in the journal Pediatric Obesity.

Contact Information

Contact: Cynthia Lee
Organization: McGill University
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-6754
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Source Site: /newsroom

Beyond the Break: Role of Vitamin D in Nutrition, Bone Health and Osteoporosis

Fri, 2016-03-04 12:00 - 13:00

 

Professor Hope Weiler, School of Dieteics and Human Nutrition, will be presenting a webinar for Osteoporosis Canada in their Beyond the Break – Education Series on Osteoporosis & Nutrition Series.

Source Site: /macdonald

Association between low vitamin D and MS

Having low levels of vitamin D doubles the risk of developing multiple sclerosis, an association that researchers conclude supports a causal relationship
Tue, 2015-08-25 16:16

Low levels of vitamin D significantly increase the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study led by Dr. Brent Richards of the Lady Davis Institute at the Jewish General Hospital, and published in PLOS Medicine. This finding, the result of a sophisticated Mendelian randomization analysis, confirms a long-standing hypothesis that low vitamin D is strongly associated with an increased susceptibility to MS. This connection is independent of other factors associated with low vitamin D levels, such as obesity.

Contact Information

Contact: Emmanuelle Paciullo
Organization: Lady Davis Institute
Email:
Office Phone: 514-340-8222 x 4120
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Source Site: /newsroom

Calcium supplements linked to longer lifespans in women

Calcium-rich diet and supplements provide similar benefits
Wed, 2013-05-22 15:02

Taking a calcium supplement of up to 1,000 mg per day can help women live longer, according to a study whose lead author was Lisa Langsetmo, a Ph.D. Research Associate at McGill University, and whose senior author was Prof. David Goltzman, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism in the Department of Medicine of the Faculty of Medicine and researcher in the Musculoskeletal Disorders axis at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC).Their findings are published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

Contact Information

Contact: Cynthia Lee
Organization: Media Relations Office
Email:
Office Phone: 514.398.6754
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Source Site: /newsroom

The right amount of vitamin D for babies

Study confirms 400 IU daily dose for infants under one year of age
Tue, 2013-04-30 14:53


Vitamin D is crucial to the growth of healthy bones. It is especially important that babies get enough of it during the first twelve months of their lives when their bones are growing rapidly. This is why health care providers frequently recommend that parents give their babies a daily vitamin D supplement. But how much vitamin D should babies be given?

Contact Information

Contact: Katherine Gombay
Organization: Media Relations
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-2189
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Source Site: /newsroom

Newly discovered effects of vitamin D on cancer

Vitamin D slows the progression of cells from premalignant to malignant states, keeping their proliferation in check
Thu, 2012-11-22 09:45

A team of researchers at McGill University have discovered a molecular basis for the potential cancer preventive effects of vitamin D. The team, led by McGill professors John White and David Goltzman, of the Faculty of Medicine’s Department of Physiology, discovered that the active form of vitamin D acts by several mechanisms to inhibit both the production and function of the protein cMYC. cMYC drives cell division and is active at elevated levels in more than half of all cancers. Their results are published in the latest edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Contact Information

Contact: Cynthia Lee
Organization: McGill University
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-6754
Category:
Source Site: /newsroom
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