Quick Links

NASA

Expert: NASA News Conference on exoplanet (Feb. 22, 2017)

Wed, 2017-02-22 10:31

NASA will hold a news conference at 1 p.m. EST Wednesday, Feb. 22, to present new findings on planets that orbit stars other than our sun, known as exoplanets. The event will air live on NASA Television. (Source: NASA)

Contact Information

Contact: Vincent Allaire
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-6693
Mobile Phone: 514-704-6693
Category:
Source Site: /newsroom

Nearing the limits of life on Earth

Tue, 2016-01-19 14:26

Failure to find active microbes in coldest Antarctic soils has implications for search for life on Mars

Natural Resource Sciences professor Lyle Whyte and postdoctoral fellow Jackie Goordial talk about their research which suggests that it is unlikely that it is unlikely that there is any microbial life to be found on Mars.

Source Site: /macdonald

Nearing the limits of life on Earth

Tue, 2016-01-19 10:27

By Katherine Gombay, McGill Newsroom

Failure to find active microbes in coldest Antarctic soils has implications for search for life on Mars

Contact Information

Contact: Prof. Lyle Whyte
Organization: Dept. of Natural Resource Sciences - McGill University
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-7889

Secondary Contact Information

Contact: Katherine Gombay
Organization: Media Relations - McGill University
Office Phone: 514-398-2189
Source Site: /newsroom

Water on Mars: NASA announcement

Mon, 2015-09-28 11:16

Contact Information

Contact: Vincent Allaire
Organization: Media Relations Office
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-6693
Mobile Phone: 514-704-6693
Category:
Source Site: /newsroom

NASA Telescopes Find Galaxy Cluster with Vibrant Heart

Astronomers have discovered a rare beast of a galaxy cluster whose heart is bursting with new stars. The unexpected find, made with the help of NASA's Spitzer and Hubble space telescopes, suggests that behemoth galaxies at the cores of these massive clusters can grow significantly by feeding off gas stolen from another galaxy
Thu, 2015-09-10 20:57

"Usually, the stars at the centers of galaxy clusters are old and dead, essentially fossils," said Tracy Webb of McGill University, Montreal, Canada, lead author of a new paper on the findings accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal. "But we think the giant galaxy at the center of this cluster is furiously making new stars after merging with a smaller galaxy."

Category:
Source Site: /newsroom