DNA

HIV target shows surprising resistance

Published: 8Apr2016

By Tod Hoffman, Lady Davis Institute  Research reveals that even a tiny mutation can allow the HIV virus to become resistant to therapies using the CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing platform

From backyard pool chemical to nanomaterial

Published: 1Mar2016

By Chris Chipello, McGill Newsroom Could a cheap molecule used to disinfect swimming pools provide the key to creating a new form of DNA nanomaterials?

Same gene can encode proteins with divergent functions

Published: 11Feb2016

By Cynthia Lee, McGill Newsroom It’s not unusual for siblings to seem more dissimilar than similar: one becoming a florist, for example, another becoming a flutist, and another becoming a physicist.

Chronic pain changes our immune systems

Published: 28Jan2016

By Cynthia LeeNewsroom Chronic pain may reprogram the way genes work in the immune system, according to a new study by McGill University researchers published in the journal Scientific Reports.  

A ‘printing press’ for nanoparticles

Published: 7Jan2016

Gold nanoparticles have unusual optical, electronic and chemical properties, which scientists are seeking to put to use in a range of new technologies, from nanoelectronics to cancer treatments.

The father effect

Published: 8Oct2015

Discovery of how environmental memories may be transmitted from a man to his grandchildren

A better way to build DNA scaffolds

Published: 6May2015

Imagine taking strands of DNA – the material in our cells that determines how we look and function – and using it to build tiny structures that can deliver drugs to targets within the body or take...

Building tailor-made DNA nanotubes step by step

Published: 23Feb2015

Researchers at McGill University have developed a new, low-cost method to build DNA nanotubes block by block – a breakthrough that could help pave the way for scaffolds made from DNA strands to be...

DNA ‘cages’ may aid drug delivery

Published: 3Sep2013

Nanoscale “cages” made from strands of DNA can encapsulate small-molecule drugs and release them in response to a specific stimulus, McGill University researchers report in a new study.

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