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Biology

Molecule shown to repair damaged axons

Discovery could be key to treating brain and spinal cord injury
Wed, 2017-03-08 15:22

A foray into plant biology led one researcher to discover that a natural molecule can repair axons, the thread-like projections that carry electrical signals between cells. Axonal damage is the major culprit underlying disability in conditions such as spinal cord injury and stroke. 

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Source Site: /newsroom

Bacteria control levels of dangerous pollutant in seabirds

Wed, 2016-12-21 10:05

Despite ongoing global pollution, researchers Kyle Elliott (Natural Resource Sciences) and John Elliott (Environment Canada) have discovered that levels of mercury in seabirds off the coast of B.C. have remained relatively stable over the past 50 years. Surprisingly, mercury in seabirds is now actually slightly lower.

Source Site: /macdonald

International Human Epigenome Consortium studies mark major step forward for epigenetics research

McGill scientists contribute to collection of publications in high-impact journals
Thu, 2016-11-17 12:25

One of the great mysteries in biology is how the many different cell types that make up our bodies are derived from a single cell and from one DNA sequence, or genome. We have learned a lot from studying the human genome, but have only partially unveiled the processes underlying cell determination. The identity of each cell type is largely defined by an instructive layer of molecular annotations on top of the genome – the epigenome – which acts as a blueprint unique to each cell type and developmental stage.

Contact Information

Contact: Tony Kwan
Organization: McGill Epigenomics Mapping Centre
Email:

Secondary Contact Information

Contact: Chris Chipello
Organization: Media Relations Office
Office Phone: 514-398-4201
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Source Site: /newsroom

City birds are smarter than country birds

Mon, 2016-03-21 10:32

By Cynthia Lee, McGill Newsroom

Life in the city changes cognition, behavior and physiology of birds to their advantage

Birds living in urban environments are smarter than birds from rural environments.

But, why do city birds have the edge over their country friends? They adapted to their urban environments enabling them to exploit new resources more favorably than their rural counterparts, say a team of all-McGill University researchers.

Contact Information

Contact: Cynthia Lee
Organization: Media Relations Office - McGill University
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-6754
Source Site: /newsroom

Special Seminar - The C. elegans Motor Circuit: Development, Function and Disease Models (Mei Zhen)

Thu, 2015-10-08 14:30 - 15:30
Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital : de Grandpre Communications Centre, CA, 3801 University Street , H3A 2B4
Price: no cost

SPECIAL SEMINAR ANNOUNCEMENT:

Thursday, October 8, 2015 at 2:30 pm

De Grandpré Communications Centre, MNI

“The C. elegans Motor Circuit: Development, Function and Disease Models”

Mei Zhen

Contact Information

Contact: Deborah Rashcovsky
Organization: Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-6047

What's in our genes? 14:30

Sat, 2015-08-22 14:30 - 15:00

A Life in Research

Source Site: /canal-savoir

What's in our genes? 22:00

Thu, 2015-08-20 22:00 - 22:30

A Life in Research

Source Site: /canal-savoir

What's in our genes? 10:30

Wed, 2015-08-19 10:30 - Fri, 2015-08-21 11:30

A Life in Research

Source Site: /canal-savoir

What's in our genes? 4:30

Tue, 2015-08-18 04:30 - 05:00

A Life in Research

Source Site: /canal-savoir

Popular antioxidant likely ineffective, study finds

Research with mice undercuts widely held belief that ubiquinone protects cells against damage from free radicals
Fri, 2015-03-06 09:56

The popular dietary supplement ubiquinone, also known as Coenzyme Q10, is widely believed to function as an antioxidant, protecting cells against damage from free radicals. But a new study by scientists at McGill University finds that ubiquinone is not a crucial antioxidant -- and that consuming it is unlikely to provide any benefit.

Contact Information

Contact: Cynthia Lee
Organization: Media Relations Office
Email:
Office Phone: 514-398-6754

Secondary Contact Information

Contact: Prof. Siegfried Hekimi
Organization: Department of Biology
Source Site: /newsroom