Quick Links

Cancer research in biochemistry

These are MDA231 cells which are the human breast cancer cell line. We stained them with Vinculin (green) which couples as a focal adhesion protein the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins to the actomyosin cytoskeleton and actin (red) which is structural protein involved in cell polarization, endocytosis, and other cytoskeletal function.

Dr. Morag Park's lab

Cancer research at McGill University is carried out by the Rosalind and Morris Goodman Cancer Research Centre (GCRC) [originally the McGill Cancer Centre], and the Cancer Research Division of the Oncology Department, under the common directorship of Dr. Morag Park, professor at the Department of Biochemistry. [History of the Morris Goodman Cancer Research Centre]

The McGill Cancer Centre was created in 1978 with the aim of focusing the basic cancer research at McGill. It was built around a core group of dedicated investigators who would interact with the overall University biomedical research community. In 1988, the University created the Research Division of the Oncology Department to supplement and expand the research efforts of the Centre. The importance of the Centre was recognized in 1993 by the Fonds pour la Formation et l'Aide à la Recherche du Québec (FCAR) through continuing core support.

The Centre’s research efforts were greatly supported in 2008 thanks to a remarkable donation from Rosalind and Morris Goodman. The Goodman family’s generosity resulted in the Centre being renamed the Rosalind and Morris Goodman Cancer Research Centre in their honor. To this day, their support continues to uphold the Centre’s endeavor to make cancer a disease of the past.

The Centre continues to coordinate cancer research at the different departments and affiliated hospitals of McGill with the goal of making new discoveries leading to the improvement of prevention and treatment of cancer. Through its own activities and international collaborations, the Centre focuses on new discoveries and knowledge leading to the improvement of the prevention and treatment of cancer.