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Announcements

2014

  1. Atelier TAG in consortium with Jodoin Lamarre Pratte architectes wins Salle de spectacle de Saint-Jérôme competition (August 2014)
  2. Amale Andraos named dean of Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation (August 2014)
  3. Two Ph.D. students awarded TD Bank Group-CCA Collection Research Grants (June 2014)
  4. Prof. Aaron Sprecher promoted to Associate Professor (June 2014)
  5. Blanche Lemco van Ginkel receives Honorary Degree of Doctor of Science at Convocation on May 29 (May 2014)
  6. Recent graduate Marie-Ève Lamarre awarded LOJIC prize at National Assembly (May 2014)
  7. David Theodore successfully defends doctoral dissertation at Harvard (April 2014)
  8. Recipients of the 2014 Governor General's Medals in Architecture announced (April 2014)
  9. Robert A.M. Stern Architects Announces Winner of 2014 RAMSA Travel Fellowship (April 2014)
  10. Third prize shared by McGill student at 19th Interuniversity Charrette (March 2014)
  11. Fred and Betty Price Research Award (March 2014)
  12. Vernacular Architecture Forum Ambassadors Award (February 2014)
  13. Ewa Bieniecka Elected RAIC Regional Director for Quebec (January 2014)
  14. Design Competition: Plage de l’Est (January 2014)
  15. Michael Jemtrud Receives SSHRC Insight Grant (January 2014)

2013

  1. 2013 Canadian Architect Awards of Excellence (December 2013)
  2. First prize in 5th Advanced Architecture Contest of the IAAC (December 2013)
  3. Winning entries in International Garden Festival competition (December 2013)
  4. Architecture in Formation co-edited by Aaron Sprecher (November 2013)
  5. Awards to Thibodeau Architecture + Design for Pacific Central Station (November 2013)
  6. New awards to Fournier Gersovitz Moss Drolet et Associés Architectes (November 2013)
  7. Adrian Sheppard awarded Ordre des urbanistes du Québec prize (October 2013)
  8. School of Architecture professional program highlighted in Spacing (September 2013)
  9. Martin Bressani Receives SSHRC Insight Grant (September 2013)
  10. Ipek Türeli Receives SSHRC Insight Development Grant (September 2013)
  11. Mitacs Elevate Award to Bassem Eid Mohamed (August 2013)
  12. RAIC Award of Excellence to KANVA (June 2013)
  13. Two New Professors: David Newton and David Theodore (June 2013)
  14. Concours d’idées en design urbain: Pôle muséal du quartier Montcalm - Elisabeth Bouchard (June 2013)
  15. Raymond Moriyama Receives Honorary Doctorate from University of Calgary (June 2013)
  16. Two Recent Graduates Win Burnham Prize Competition (June 2013)
  17. Rafico Ruiz Awarded CCA Residency (June 2013)
  18. Alberto Pérez-Gómez Co-applicant on SSHRC Partnership Grant (May 2013)
  19. Prof. Martin Bressani Receives Teaching Award and Francis Ng Receives TA Award (May 2013)
  20. Francois Leblanc Awarded SSHRC Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship (May 2013)
  21. Ioana Teodorescu Wins Phyllis Lambert Prize (May 2013)
  22. Montréal ZERO Inc. (Sevag Pogharian) awarded support from Natural Resources Canada’s ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative (May 2013)
  23. Manon Asselin Architecte + JLP Architectes Win MMFA Competition (April 2013)
  24. Ipek Türeli receives FQRSC grant (April 2013)
  25. Lyceum Fellowship in Architecture (April 2013)
  26. Lateral Office exhibition on Nunavut will represent Canada at Venice Biennale (March 2013)
  27. Five out of Seven Prizes to McGill at 18th Interuniversity Charrette (February 2013)
  28. IRHA Award: Michael Jemtrud (February 2013)
  29. Warming Huts Competition: Atelier Big City (January 2013)
  30. Crossing Borders Competition (January 2013)
  31. Ice Hotel 2013: First Prize to McGill (January 2013)

2012

  1. 2012 Canadian Architect Awards of Excellence (December 2012)
  2. Ice Hotel 2013 (December 2012)
  3. Les Mérites d'architecture de la Ville de Québec - Elisabeth Bouchard (December 2012)
  4. Lauréate du Fonds Société et culture - Frederika Eilers (December 2012)
  5. Urban Design and Housing option highlighted in Azure (November 2012)
  6. Raymond-Lévesque Library: Facteur D Award for Architecture (October 2012)
  7. ContemPLAY Pavilion: Prix d'Excellence de la construction en acier (September 2012)
  8. inFormed Consent: Projects from Open Source Architecture (September 2012)
  9. ACSA/AISC Steel Design Student Competition (July 2012)
  10. Max Stern McCord Museum Fellowship (July 2012)
  11. David Covo Inducted into the Order of Athabasca University (June 2012)
  12. Lucas Crawford Awarded Governor General's Gold Medal (June 2012)
  13. AZ Awards: Best Student Project (June 2012)
  14. Three Graduate Students Receive SSHRC Awards (June 2012)
  15. Prof. Nik Luka Promoted to Associate Professor (June 2012)
  16. Steel Tube of ContemPLAY Pavilion Wins Galvanizing Award (May 2012)
  17. Aaron Sprecher Receives SSHRC Partnership Development Grant (May 2012)
  18. Smith Promenade (Griffintown) Urban Design Competition (May 2012)
  19. Lola Sheppard Wins Architecture Canada | RAIC 2012 Young Architect Award (April 2012)
  20. Lyceum Traveling Fellowship in Architecture (April 2012)
  21. Migrating Landscapes - Venice Biennale (March 2012)
  22. Andrew King Receives Two P/A Awards (February 2012)
  23. Caitlin Turski Awarded Honorable Mention in AIDS Memorial Park Competition (January 2012)
  24. Jason Tsironis Wins Prix de Rome in Architecture for Emerging Practitioners (January 2012)
  25. Radoslav Zuk Awarded Ukraine's 2011 State Prize for Architecture (January 2012)

2011

  1. Concours jeune critique MAQ en architecture (December 2011)
  2. CCA Charrette (November 2011)
  3. Holcim Award Winners for North America (October 2011)
  4. 11th Annual ACSA/AISC Steel Design Student Competition (July 2011)
  5. Sustainability Projects Fund: Edible Campus (May 2011)
  6. SSHRC Insight Development Grant (May 2011)
  7. Raumfinden Exhibition at the House of Architecture in Graz (May 2011)
  8. Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library Research Fellowship + Margaret Gillett Graduate Research Award (May 2011)
  9. SSAC Martin Eli Weil Prize (April 2011)
  10. RAIC 2011 Awards of Excellence (April 2011)
  11. Lyceum Traveling Fellowship in Architecture (March 2011)
  12. SSHRC Research Creation Grant in Fine Arts (March 2011)
  13. ContemPLAY Pavilion (March 2011)

2010

  1. 2010 Canadian Architect Awards of Excellence (December 2010)
  2. Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals (CAHP) Awards (November 2010)
  3. Notre-Dame-de-Grâce Cultural Centre (October 2010)
  4. 5th i-Rec Student Competition (August 2010)
  5. Director of McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies (August 2010)
  6. Professional Prix de Rome in Architecture (July 2010)
  7. Above the Pavement — The Farm! (June 2010)
  8. 9th Annual SSEF Architectural Student Design Competition 2010 (May 2010)
  9. Fellowship in the RAIC (March 2010)
  10. Scarlet Key (March 2010)
  11. Major Collaborative Research Initiative (March 2010)
  12. Prix de Rome for Emerging Practitioners (March 2010)

2009

  1. Max Kalman (November 2009)
  2. CCA Charrette (November 2009)
  3. Applied Arts Awards (November 2009)
  4. Outdoor Sound Art Installation for June Callwood Park (October 2009)
  5. SITQ Award for Excellence (September 2009)
  6. UN Habitat Scroll of Honour (September 2009)
  7. Newfoundland Historic Trust Southcott Award (June 2009)
  8. Re-Forming Health Colloquium, Melbourne (June 2009)
  9. Trudeau Foundation Scholarship (May 2009)
  10. Tilting Exhibition Opens at Dalhousie (May 2009)
  11. Billes Architecture Student Design Competition (April 2009)
  12. Lyceum Traveling Fellowship in Architecture (March 2009)
  13. ParaSolar: Phototropic Environments (March 2009)
  14. Shovel Ready + 49 Cities (March 2009)
  15. My Two Polish Grandfathers (March 2009)
  16. n-natures (March 2009)
  17. Grafika Graphic Design Award (February 2009)
  18. Canadian Architect 2008 Awards of Excellence (January 2009)

2008

  1. CCA Charrette (November 2008)
  2. National History Society's Pierre Berton Award (November 2008)
  3. AIA/AAH Student Design Charrette (November 2008)
  4. College of Fellows, Association for Preservation Technology (October 2008)
  5. Schulich Gift (September 2008)
  6. The Award for Architectural Integration (September 2008)
  7. 2008 Venice Biennale in Architecture (August 2008)
  8. "That's It"...Architecture 2008 (August 2008)
  9. International Illumination Design Awards (August 2008)
  10. Power Corporation of Canada Awards at the CCA (May 2008)
  11. National Urban Design Awards (May 2008)
  12. Annual Staff Award of Excellence in the Faculty of Engineering (May 2008)
  13. David Thomson Award for Excellence in Graduate Supervision and Teaching (April 2008)
  14. SSHRC Standard Research Grant (April 2008)
  15. Lyceum Traveling Fellowship in Architecture (April 2008)
  16. CFI Leaders Opportunity Fund (March 2008)
  17. Écologez Integrated Design for Green Building Competition (March 2008)
  18. PS1 Design Competition (February 2008)
  19. Tradewell Fellowship - WHR Architects, Houston (February 2008)
  20. Medicine By Design by Annmarie Adams published by University of Minnesota Press (January 2008)
  21. atelier T.A.G. wins the Professional Prix de Rome in Architecture (January 2008)

2007

  1. Volvo Research and Educational Foundations: Future Urban Transport programme (December 2007)
  2. CCA Charrette (October 2007)
  3. Two Honours for Emeritus Professor Zuk (October 2007)
  4. Tilting: Rugged Landscape, Strong People, Fragile Architecture (September 2007)
  5. New Director of School: Michael Jemtrud (August 2007)
  6. Sustainable Residential Development: Planning and Design for Green Neighbourhoods (August 2007)
  7. New Silk Road Park, China (July 2007)
  8. International Academy for Design and Health Research Award (June 2007)
  9. Novi Sad Museum Design Competition (June 2007)
  10. Newfoundland Historic Trust Southcott Award (June 2007)
  11. OAQ 2007 Architecture Awards of Excellence (June 2007)
  12. Canada Post Marks RAIC Centennial (May 2007)
  13. 6th Annual SSEF Architectural Student Design Competition 2007 (May 2007)
  14. SSHRC Major Collaborative Research Initiative (May 2007)
  15. The Alcuin Society Awards for Excellence in Book Design in Canada (April 2007)
  16. FQRSC Postdoctoral Fellowship (April 2007)
  17. Great Unsolved Mysteries in Canadian History (April 2007)
  18. CCA Power Corporation of Canada Award (April 2007)
  19. Two Professors Awarded SSHRC Research/Creation Grants (February 2007)
  20. CMHC EQuilibrium Sustainable Housing Competition (February 2007)
  21. Steel Structures Education Foundation Award Winners (February 2007)
  22. Nineteenth Century Studies Association 2007 Emerging Scholar Award (February 2007)
  23. Southbank International Architectural Competition (January 2007)

2006

  1. McGill MBA Students + Architecture PhD Student Capture International Title (December 2006)
  2. McGill's Formal Degree Options in Urban Design (November 2006)
  3. Arcus Endowment Scholar-in-Residence (October 2006)
  4. 17th Latin American Conference on Health Care Architecture and Engineering - Best Paper Presentation (October 2006)
  5. The Paul E. Buchanan Award (June 2006)
  6. CCA Power Corporation of Canada Award (June 2006)
  7. 5th Annual SSEF Architectural Student Design Competition 2006
  8. Four of twelve GG-winning buildings by School adjunct professors (May 2006)

2005

  1. Eric Bunge wins the Professional Prix de Rome in Architecture (Sept. 2005)
  2. Archiprix International Competition 2005
  3. 2005 PCI Architectural Design Competition
  4. Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation Travel Grant
  5. 4th Annual SSEF Architectural Student Design Competition 2005
  6. SSAC Martin Eli Weil Prize
  7. AFSMSS Best Student Paper Prize
  8. CCA Power Corporation of Canada Award (March 2005)

2004

  1. AIA 2004 James J. Souder Fellowship
  2. Montreal architecture firm wins the new Professional Prix de Rome in Architecture (June 2004)
  3. 2003-04 Leading Edge Student Design Competition
  4. 2003-04 Laboratories for the 21st Century Student Design Competition
  5. ACSA Collaborative Practice Award (March 2004)

Atelier TAG in consortium with Jodoin Lamarre Pratte architectes wins Salle de spectacle de Saint-Jérôme competition

Atelier TAG in consortium with Jodoin Lamarre Pratte architectes has won the Salle de spectacle de Saint-Jérôme competition.  Manon Asselin (B.Arch. 1992, M.Arch. 2001) is co-founder, with her partner Katsuhiro Yamazaki (B.Arch. 1996), of Atelier TAG. They were Gerald Sheff Visiting Professors in Architecture at the School during the Fall 2012 term. Construction of the project will begin in the spring of 2015, with an opening date forecast of September 2016.  The facility will have 875 seats and will be built near Place de la Gare on land given by the Ville de Saint-Jérôme.

Manon Asselin commented on the project : "Le projet de la salle de spectacle de Saint Jérôme est d’abord pour nous une opportunité de créer, à travers l’architecture,  une expérience significative et magique pour la communauté, celle d’aller au théâtre. En créant un projet iconique, nous espérons que cet équipement culturel d’envergure deviendra un moteur économique important pour la région, porteur du rayonnement grandissant en art de la scène de son diffuseur et de la filière bois de son territoire à travers l’utilisation poétique d’un matériau identitaire important au Québec."

For further information, please see here and here.

 

Amale Andraos named dean of Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation

Amale Andraos (BArch 1996) has been named dean of Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation (GSAPP). Principal (with Dan Wood) of New York-based architecture firm WORKac, Andraos is currently on faculty at GSAPP, and she has also taught at Princeton, Harvard, the University of Pennsylvania, and the American University in Beirut. For further information, please consult the following coverage: The New York Times, Archinect, Columbia Daily Spectator, The Architect’s Newspaper Blog, world-architects, Artinfo, and Columbia News. Please also see the Norman Kietzmann illustrated profile.

 

Two Ph.D. students awarded TD Bank Group-CCA Collection Research Grants

Ph.D. students Heather Braiden and Ayca Koseoglu have received TD Bank Group-CCA Collection Research Grants for 2014. These grants are offered to doctoral students in architecture, in humanities and in social sciences in Canadian universities to facilitate access to the CCA Collection during residencies of one to three months at the Study Centre in the Summer of 2014. All students currently enrolled in a doctoral program in humanities and social sciences in Canada are eligible for this award, regardless of citizenship. The grant provides a monthly stipend of $2,000 CAD to cover the travel, housing, and living expenses of each recipient for a residency in Montreal. This year, the CCA gave priority to research proposals that address the history and theory of contemporary architecture. Braiden's project is titled "Rhetorics of Infrastructure: The Visual, Textual, and Cultural History of Three Montreal Bridges" and Koseoglu's is titled "Urban Transformations in Modern Turkey: Constructing Memory, Identity and Architecture through Istanbul’s Public Squares."

 

Prof. Aaron Sprecher promoted to Associate Professor

The Board of Governors of McGill University has approved the promotion of Prof. Aaron Sprecher to the rank of Associate Professor with tenure, effective June 1, 2014. Prof. Sprecher was initially appointed as a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the School of Architecture in the summer of 2008.

 

Blanche Lemco van Ginkel receives Honorary Degree of Doctor of Science at Convocation on May 29

From the Convocation brochure:

Architect, educator and urban planner Blanche Lemco van Ginkel (CM, FRAIC, BArch [McGill], MCP [Harvard]) has influenced urban landscapes worldwide, but nowhere has her vision and tenacity had greater impact than here in Montreal, where she began her career and honed her remarkable skills.

In partnership with her late husband, Sandy, Blanche van Ginkel played a key role in preserving Old Montreal during the 1960s and courageously led the charge to protect the south slope of Mount Royal from urban developers. Later, the duo helped design Montreal’s Expo ’67, the immediately successful international exhibition that came to symbolize Canada’s cultural effervescence in its centennial year.

An inspirational educator and leader in her profession, Blanche van Ginkel was among the first in promoting integrated, Modernist design concepts to generations of men and women architects and urban planners. Her work at the Atelier Le Corbusier in Paris included the Unité d’Habitation in Marseille, which is considered a masterpiece of European Modernism.

A former Dean of the Faculty of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at the University of Toronto, she has taught at McGill, the Université de Montréal, Harvard, and the University of Pennsylvania.

Blanche van Ginkel's message to the students:

Thinking about the nature of architecture, engineering and city planning, I was reminded of the rhyme “little drops of water, little grains of sand make a mighty ocean and a pleasant land” and of Robert Browning’s poem which ends with “For the loss of a nail the shoe was lost. For the loss of the shoe the horse was lost, for the loss of a horse the rider was lost, for the loss of the rider the message was lost, for the loss of the message the battle was lost, for the loss of the battle the war was lost; for the loss of the war the kingdom was lost – and all for the loss of a horseshoe nail.”

Similarly, and more briefly, the architect, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, stated “God is in the details.”

However, the city planner, Daniel Burnham exhorted us to “make no small plans,” recognizing the interrelationships within a construct and that the whole, ultimately, may be more significant than its parts.

For architects, in particular, the overriding concern is to consider equally and simultaneously both the totality and the constituent elements – the one affecting the other. And somewhat similarly, reconciling the demands of human use, material possibilities and accessible resources – sometimes a difficult balancing act.

It is an interesting and exhilarating professional world. I wish all of you well in finding at least a semblance of equilibrium in this balancing act in your professional career – and I hope that you derive some satisfaction from it in the process.

Blanche Lemco van Ginkel

 

Recent graduate Marie-Ève Lamarre awarded LOJIC prize at National Assembly

Les Offices jeunesse internationaux du Québec (LOJIC) highlighted the excellence of 17 international mobility projects with the presentation of the sixth LOJIQ prizes held May 27 at the National Assembly in front of nearly 300 guests. Recent graduate Marie-Ève Lamarre (M.Arch. professional 2012) was one of the prize recipients (Prix LOJIQ Recherche et développement) for her project "Imaginer la ville de demain par l’observation de l’urbanisation au Japon."

From the LOJIC prize webpage: "LOJIQ – Les Offices jeunesse internationaux du Québec – ont souligné l’excellence de 17 projets de mobilité internationale lors de la remise des 6e Prix LOJIQ qui s’est tenue le 27 mai à l’Assemblée nationale devant près de 300 invités. Au total, ce sont 21 jeunes Québécoises et Québécois qui se sont particulièrement démarqués, parmi les 5658 participants soutenus l’année dernière par LOJIQ, notamment par rapport aux acquis professionnels et personnels qu’ils ont générés, mais aussi pour leur contribution en faveur du développement et du rayonnement du Québec. Mme Christine St-Pierre, ministre des Relations internationales et de la Francophonie, était présente pour remettre le Grand Prix de la soirée : « Je félicite chaleureusement tous les jeunes ayant participé aux programmes des Offices internationaux pour la jeunesse, et particulièrement les lauréats des Prix LOJIQ. Le rôle des organismes voués à la mobilité internationale des jeunes est crucial afin de bien les préparer aux défis devant eux tant sur les plans professionnel, culturel que social. » Le dirigeant de LOJIQ, monsieur Alfred Pilon, a pour sa part tenu à souligner la qualité exceptionnelle des projets mis en lumière au cours de la soirée et à rappeler que « la scène internationale constitue un formidable révélateur de talents pour tous ces jeunes québécois qui osent partir à la conquête du monde mais surtout à la conquête d’eux-mêmes »."

Web announcement on the OAQ website: click here.  Link to Lamarre's report: here.

 

David Theodore successfully defends doctoral dissertation at Harvard

On April 29, 2014, David Theodore (B.A. 1991, B.Sc.[Arch.] 1994, B.Arch. 1996, M.Arch. 2001) successfully defended his doctoral dissertation at Harvard University. He will attend Harvard Commencement on May 29, and will be appointed Assistant Professor at the School on August 1. The following is the abstract of the dissertation entitled Towards a New Hospital: Architecture, Medicine, and Computation, 1960-75:

This dissertation provides an account of how computing left behind its origins in academic and military research to become part of the hospital’s equipmental setting. I examine the efforts of reformers, including administrators, planners, architects, and computer consultants, to provide appropriate accommodation for modern biomedicine. I explore three stories in order to untangle the admixture of architecture, medicine, and computation as they intertwined through a mutual engagement with automation, operations research, cybernetics, and biomedical research in the postwar hospital. In London, architects Llewelyn Davies Weeks used computer algorithms to help design Northwick Park Hospital. In Boston, pioneering research consultants Bolt Beranek & Newman collaborated with the Massachusetts General Hospital on an experimental total information system known as the Hospital Computer Project. And in Canada, the Montreal Neurological Institute adopted computing to transform its expertise in clinical brain imaging research. When possible, I emphasize specific computers, arguing that attention to the presence of the machine itself contributes to our understanding of hospital life.

In examining hospital reform after the Second World War, I claim that the hospital building must be conceived as something other than a physical representation of medical knowledge, first, because the new computer-oriented hospital practices often took place in buildings not purpose-built to accommodate them; and second, because reformers who used computation to design and construct new hospitals sought an architecture that would accommodate a state of permanent progress. The resulting buildings were deliberately planned to provide only a “loose fit” to biomedical knowledge. Hospital computer information systems and hospital architecture developed homologous designs meant to forestall obsolescence and self-adjust to growth and change.

I conclude that the failures and reversals these optimistic reformers encountered indicate the emergence of a stable sociotechnical configuration, a set of places and practices intertwined with problems that could not be overcome through improved designs, more diligent scientific research, or through calling for more compliant users, especially nurses, or re-training them. Finally, I posit the lattice diagram as the best image of the forces that linked architecture, medicine, and computation together in the drive towards a new hospital.

Work-study

 

Recipients of the 2014 Governor General's Medals in Architecture announced

From the Daily News webpage of the Canadian Architect website:

The Canada Council for the Arts and RAIC | Architecture Canada recently announced the recipients of the Governor General’s Medals in Architecture. The awards celebrate outstanding design in recently completed projects by Canadian architects. The winning buildings reflect excellence in sustainable design, innovation and compatibility with the landscape.

Of the 14 winners, two have special connections to McGill:

Mies van der Rohe Gas Station Conversion in Verdun, Quebec, by Les Architectes FABG: Eric Gauthier, a principal of Les Architectes FABG, is Gerald Sheff Visiting Professor in Architecture for the Winter 2014 term.

Raymond-Lévesque Public Library in Saint-Hubert, Quebec, by Atelier TAG and Jodoin Lamarre Pratte architectes en consortium: Manon Asselin (B.Arch. 1992, M.Arch. 2001) is co-founder, with her partner Katsuhiro Yamazaki (B.Arch. 1996), of Atelier TAG. They were Gerald Sheff Visiting Professors in Architecture at the School during the Fall 2012 term. Other key members on the Atelier TAG team who are McGill alumni include Pawel Karwowski (B.Arch. 1996), Mathieu Lemieux-Blanchard (B.Sc.[Arch.] 2004), Conor Sampson (B.Arch. 1996), and Éole Sylvain Hupé (M.Arch. 2011).

Eleven of the 12 buildings selected this year were built to enhance community life. Projects include cooperative housing, university buildings, a city hall, a community centre, an outdoor stage and two libraries. Winners will present their projects in a free public lecture in the auditorium of the National Gallery of Canada on May 12, 2014 at 6:00pm, and the Awards will be presented during a ceremony at Rideau Hall on May 13, 2014 at 2:00pm.

“Our built environments have a profound impact on our lives and communities,” said His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada. “That is why I am so pleased to honour the many talented Canadian architects at work today, including the recipients of this year’s Governor General’s Medals in Architecture. Working as individuals and in teams, they have made lasting architectural contributions to communities in Canada and internationally, and for that I am truly grateful.”

The Governor General’s Medals in Architecture, created by RAIC | Architecture Canada, contribute to the development of the discipline and practice of architecture, and increase public awareness of architecture as a vital cultural force in Canadian society. These awards are administered jointly with the Canada Council for the Arts, which is responsible for the adjudication process and contributes to the publication highlighting the medal winners.

Members of the 2014 peer assessment committee were: James KM Cheng, FRAIC; Maxime Frappier, MIRAC; David Miller, MRAIC; Roberta Brandes Gratz; and Dorte Mandrup.

 

Robert A.M. Stern Architects Announces Winner of 2014 RAMSA Travel Fellowship

From the News webpage of the Robert A.M. Stern Architects website:

The winner of the 2014 RAMSA Travel Fellowship was announced this evening [April 25, 2014] at an event in RAMSA's New York office. The winner, Anna Antropova, a Master's candidate at the McGill University School of Architecture, will be awarded $10,000 to fund travel to Japan, where she will study ancient wood joinery techniques. Her research is driven by the potential transformation and application of ancient timber techniques to modern construction: “This elegant and efficient mode of construction could meaningfully inform our western building industry, an industry addicted to toxic adhesives and an indiscriminate application of metal fasteners. Wood stands to be for our generation what steel and concrete were for the previous two or three, and Japanese joinery offers us a sustainable mode of assembly for a sustainable material with far less embodied energy.” Ms. Antropova aims to reintroduce these techniques, ultimately uniting “old and new, east and west, tradition and modernity.”

The jurors were impressed by the clarity and academic rigor of Ms. Antropova’s proposal, and its applications for contemporary building practices. Ms. Antropova’s proposal was very well researched and planned, and will produce a substantial continuation to the body of research on sustainable timber frame construction. The jury consisted of RAMSA partners Melissa DelVecchio, Dan Lobitz, and Grant F. Marani. Margaret Marsh facilitated the discussion and process.

The RAMSA Travel Fellowship is a $10,000 prize awarded annually by the Partners of Robert A.M. Stern Architects for the purpose of travel and research. More specifically, the Fellowship seeks to promote investigations of the perpetuation of tradition through invention—key to the firm's own work. The prize is intended to nurture emerging talent and will be awarded each year to an individual who has proven insight and interest in the profession and its future, as well as the ability to carry forth in-depth research. The program is open to M.Arch. degree candidates in their penultimate year at the 16 schools attended by current RAMSA partners and senior associates [Columbia, Cornell, MIT, McGill, Pratt, Princeton, Rice, Syracuse, UCLA, Michigan, Minnesota, Notre Dame, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, Yale]. In this the program's second year, Ms. Antropova was selected from a field of 20 applicants preselected by their educational institutions.

 

Third prize shared by McGill student at 19th Interuniversity Charrette

M.Arch. (professional) student Carlo Tadeo, in a team with two students from the Université de Montréal, shared Third Prize with a team of students from Laval at the 19th Interuniversity Charrette on March 21, 2014. Their project was entitled Think Outside the Buildings. (Click here to view their video.) A total of 168 students in 43 teams participated in the charrette, the theme of which was Fields of Knowledge: Towards a University of the Streets.

The charrette invited young designers to think about the relationship between the university campus and the city in light of contemporary ways of living and especially of the movement of information through relationships, political actions, and new educational contexts. Based on a critical approach, the students were invited to use their experience of the campus, and to propose a closer social, environmental and educational relationship between the city and the campus.

The charrette was organized by the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) and Université de Montréal, in collaboration with McGill University, Université du Québec à Montréal, and with the participation of Concordia University, Université Laval, Carleton University, Ryerson University and University of Toronto.

Full details on the charrette, including the prize-winning submissions, can be viewed on the CCA website.

 

Fred and Betty Price Research Award

Ph.D. student Tanya Southcott has been selected as the recipient of the summer 2014 Fred and Betty Price Research Award by the Institute for the Public Life of Arts and Ideas (IPLAI). The award carries a stipend of $7,500, payable over the course of the research term.

 

Vernacular Architecture Forum Ambassadors Award

The School of Architecture has been awarded a Vernacular Architecture Forum (VAF) Ambassadors Award to support the travel of five Ph.D. students to attend the upcoming Vernacular Architecture Forum in Galloway Township, New Jersey, May 7-10. The successful application was submitted by Tanya Southcott (M. Arch. CMT 2013) on behalf of Susane Halveka, Heather Braiden, Jaimie Cudmore, and Tania Gutiérrez Monroy.

Tanya Southcott has also been awarded a Pamela H. Simpson Presenter's Fellowship towards the presentation of her paper, "Erasing the Vernacular: Slum Demolition in Postwar Montreal," which draws on her dissertation research.

 

Ewa Bieniecka Elected RAIC Regional Director for Quebec

Ewa Bieniecka has been elected Regional Director for Quebec of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC). From the RAIC Bulletin notice: "A Montreal-native, Ewa graduated from McGill University with a bachelor’s degree in architecture in 1982 and a master's degree in 2004. She is an architect with Montreal's Arcop Architecture Inc. Ewa has specialized experience with major projects and the rehabilitation and restoration of heritage buildings such as the West Block on Parliament Hill in Ottawa. She is currently working on reconstruction of the Grande Allée Armoury in Quebec City. The Change of Office ceremony will take place January 31 in Victoria, B.C. where the first board meeting of 2014 will be held."

 

Design Competition: Plage de l’Est

Ruccolo + Faubert Architectes (RFA) & Ni conception architecture de paysage have won the landscape architecture competition for the construction of a beach at the eastern tip of the island of Montréal.  The results of the design competition for the Plage de l’Est, held by the Borough of Rivière-des-Prairies–Pointe-aux-Trembles, were announced in a press release on January 20, 2014.  McGill graduate Tania Delage (M.Arch. 2009), who works at RFA, acted as project manager and presenter for the design team.

The objective of the two-stage competition was to find a winning project that would repurpose a vacant site on the shoreline of the St. Lawrence River and reappropriate the waterfront spaces for citizens’ use. The purpose was to bring out innovative approaches to the harmonious integration of the development concepts proposed with the landscape in which they will be integrated. The jury, which included experts as well as citizen representatives, chose a concept that combines universal accessibility, sustainable development, and well-being, all while providing a special connection between visitors and the St. Lawrence River.  The key element of the concept is a boardwalk integrated into the landscape that begins right at the entrance to the beach site and connects various levels with distinct uses: games, universal traffic, the beach and water-based recreation. The boardwalk, with the roof of a service building integrated into its centre, hugs the contours of the site and culminates in an observation point with an unparalleled view of the river.  In both summer and winter, the building at the centre of the boardwalk will be a venue par excellence for meetings, leisure and services. The concept calls for a water play area adjacent to the building. This sizable surface with an area of more than 200 m2 will feature a permanent stream of water flowing onto sculpted stones, and will become a skating rink in the winter months. Farther back on the site are a pair of courts designed for beach volleyball or badminton, and which will be adaptable to new needs that may emerge in years to come.

The winning scheme can be viewed here.

 

Michael Jemtrud Receives SSHRC Insight Grant

Prof. Michael Jemtrud has been awarded a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Insight Grant in the amount of $493,000 (over three years). The title of his research is “Art and Ideas in Motion: Parkour Project.” The McGill University co-applicants on the project are Wendy Adams (Faculty of Law), Patrick Hansen (Schulich School of Music), Stéfan Sinclair (Languages, Literatures, and Cultures), Alanna Thain (English), and Paul Yachnin (English). The project includes several artist, institutional, and industry collaborators including Prof. Alberto Pérez-Gómez and Prof. Ricardo Castro from the School of Architecture. It is the founding project that establishes an original and significant area of scholarly and creative activity within the Institute for the Public Life of Arts and Ideas (IPLAI), McGill University.

The Art and Ideas in Motion Parkour Project (AIM) brings research and artistic creation together to develop an account of how artistic and intellectual works and ideas move among people and places. It will study how that movement creates new public spaces for collective discourse and action, and how it makes new communities, often across barriers of language, class, race, sex, age, and nationality. It accomplishes this by structuring an interdisciplinary research-creation project that simultaneously informs and is the object of speculation of three interdependent research axes (Tracing, Play and Artistry), all with explicit goals to articulate, and appropriately represent the movement of art and ideas as well as develop new methodologies in the humanities. AIM gathers diverse disciplines and aspires to disrupt and re-structure conventional expectations and boundaries of those disciplines. The research proposes to enact new methodologies and innovative modes of dissemination, and will construct and refine interdisciplinary languages and techniques through a process of active scholarship and participation in research-creation activity.

The AIM research program is anchored by a central project entitled the Mobile Urban Stage (MUSe) that brings together team members in the humanities and artists, performers, and architects to propose alternative disciplinary practices that engage the movement of art and ideas. The image conjured for creating the inaugural project is the urban activity known as parkour, commonly referred to as the art of movement. Those who partake in the art of parkour understand the city in a wholly original manner that overcomes commonly perceived constraints and limitations. The research program is aligned with activities within the Quartier de l’innovation, Laboratory of Urban Culture initiative. AIM will engage directly with a diverse participatory audience that will push the work of scholarly and creative research beyond the academy. Ideas resonate in and through works of art through dynamic and synergistic processes that draw together known and unknown forces, objects, people, and issues, and which have a multitude of determinations from serendipitous and contextual to instrumental and technical. As such, Arts and Ideas in Motion will make an original contribution to the advancement of knowledge concerning the way in which artistic practices, methodologies, and works proffer ideas that have specific political, social, epistemological currency thus creating hidden and overt economies through the creation of diverse publics.

 

2013 Canadian Architect Awards of Excellence

McGill graduates figured prominently in two of the 11 awards in the annual Canadian Architect Awards of Excellence program. Architectural firms and students from across Canada received top honours for design proposals that embody qualities of innovation and overall design excellence.  Now in their 46th year, these awards are the highest recognition for excellence in the design stage in the Canadian architectural sector. By focusing on commissioned yet unbuilt projects along with exceptional student work, the program recognizes design ambitions and supports an overall culture of design excellence.  Of the 208 submissions received for this year’s awards program, the jury selected six projects for Awards of Excellence, three projects for Awards of Merit, and two Student Awards of Excellence.  This year’s jury was comprised of Karen Marler, partner at Hughes Condon Marler Architects (HCMA), Marianne McKenna, founding partner of KPMB Architects, and Marc Simmons, founding partner of Front Inc.

In the Awards of Excellence category, one of the six awards went to Manon Asselin architecte + Jodoin Lamarre Pratte architectes in consortium for Fifth Pavilion—Montreal Museum of Fine ArtsManon Asselin (B.Arch. 1992, M.Arch. 2001) is co-founder, with her partner Katsuhiro Yamazaki (B.Arch. 1996), of Atelier TAG. They were Gerald Sheff Visiting Professors in Architecture at the School during the Fall 2012 term. Other key members on the Atelier TAG team who are McGill alumni include Pawel Karwowski (B.Arch. 1996), Mathieu Lemieux-Blanchard (B.Sc.[Arch.] 2004), Conor Sampson (B.Arch. 1996), and Éole Sylvain Hupé (M.Arch. 2011).

In the Student Award of Excellence category, one of two awards went to Francis Ng (M.Arch. 2013) for Memento Mori: Recalling the Absence of the Catholic Church.  Jury member Karen Marler noted, “This student’s overall presentation exhibits a level of maturity in identifying the essence of the issue. This project is beautifully executed and concise in its concept.”

 

First prize in 5th Advanced Architecture Contest of the IAAC

Professional M.Arch. students Ji Won Jun (M2) and Josiane Crampé (M1) have won the first prize in the 5th edition of the international competition organized by the Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC) and Hewlett-Packard (HP).  In total, 240 submissions from 91 countries were evaluated by the jury members of the competition.  The winning submission by the McGill students was a final project developed during the Summer 2013 semester in the professional M.Arch. studio (DST) of Prof. Aaron Sprecher and Elisabeth Bouchard. The winning scheme, Walking Clouds, can be viewed on the results page of the competition website.

The IAAC is a cutting-edge education and research centre dedicated to the development of architecture capable of meeting worldwide challenges with respect to the construction of habitats in the early 21st century. Based in Barcelona, IAAC is a platform for the exchange of knowledge with faculty and students from over 35 countries, including the USA, China, India, Poland, Italy, Mexico and Sudan. Students work simultaneously on multiple scales (city, building, manufacturing) and in different areas of expertise (ecology, energy, digital manufacturing, new technologies), pursuing their own lines of investigation towards the development of an integrated set of skills with which to act effectively in their home country or globally. Since 2004, the IAAC has run the biannual Advanced Architecture Contest which is open to architects, engineers, planners and designers who want to contribute to making the world more habitable by developing a proposal capable of responding to emerging challenges in areas such as ecology, information technology, architecture, and urban planning. This year's competition theme was Self-Sufficient Habitat.

 

Winning entries in International Garden Festival competition

Six winning entries have been selected in the 15th International Garden Festival competition of Jardins de Métis / Reford Gardens for 2014. The competition attracted 293 proposals for contemporary gardens, submitted from 35 countries. One of the winning entries, Méristème by Montréal collective Châssi, includes Ph.D. student François Leblanc, together with Marie-Josée Gagnon (intern architect at Daoust Lestage Inc.) and Caroline Magar (student in landscape architecture, Université de Montréal). Another winning entry, Afterburn by Brooklyn-based Civilian Projects, includes recent professional M.Arch. graduate (2010) Ksenia Kagner, together with Nicko Elliott.

The jury was composed of Denis Boucher, chargé de projet, Conseil du patrimoine religieux du Québec; Cécile Combelle, architect with Atelier Barda and designer of the Sacré potager garden for the 2013 edition of the Festival; Vincent Lemay, landscape architect; Matei Paquin, project development director, Moment Factory; Ann Webb, past executive director and publisher, Canadian Art Foundation; and Alexander Reford, director of Jardins de Métis / Reford Gardens and the International Garden Festival.

 

Architecture in Formation co-edited by Aaron Sprecher

Prof. Aaron Sprecher's co-edited book (with Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa), Architecture in Formation: On the Nature of Information in Digital Architecture, has been published by Routledge, Taylor and Francis. Designed by Atelier Pastille Rose, the bright yellow, 350-page tome features 48 contributions by a wide range of architects and researchers, including Prof. Martin Bressani, David Theodore (Assistant Prof., as of August 2014), and former Sheff Visiting Professor Michael Wen-Sen Su. Practitioners, historians and theorists explore how information processing informs and is informed by architecture, while experimental projects propose radical means to inform digital architecture. Book launches are currently planned in Montreal, New York, London, and Buenos Aires.

To visit the Architecture in Formation webpage on the Routledge, Taylor and Francis website, please click here.

To view the book's flyer, please click here.

Book cover

 

Awards to Thibodeau Architecture + Design for Pacific Central Station

Thibodeau Architecture + Design (J. Robert Thibodeau, Principal, B.Arch. 1976, Dean of the College of Fellows of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada), with Donald Luxton & Associates Inc., have won four awards for Via Rail’s Pacific Central Station in Vancouver: 2013 Heritage Canada Foundation Ecclesiastical Insurance Cornerstone Award for Building Heritage (Adaptive Use / Rehabilitation category); 2013 Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals (CAHP) Award of Merit for Conservation / Rehabilitation (attributed to Donald Luxton & Associates Inc.); 2012 Heritage BC Award of Honour (Heritage Conservation category); 2013 City of Vancouver Heritage Award of Merit for “the restoration of the station, demonstrating an excellent model of stewardship with its comprehensive conservation plan and team approach.”

For further information on the envelope refurbishment of Pacific Central Station, please see here, and for further information on the heritage sign restoration of the station, please see here.

 

New awards to Fournier Gersovitz Moss Drolet et Associés Architectes

Fournier Gersovitz Moss Drolet et Associés Architectes (FGMDA) has received two Ecclesiastical Insurance Cornerstone Awards for Building Heritage for the following projects: Jean-Talon Station / Loblaws and Harbour Commission Building / Club 357c.  In 2013, the Heritage Canada Foundation (HCF) launched the Cornerstone awards for the regeneration of heritage buildings and sites, to bring “national attention to exemplary commercial and institutional projects” and to recognize its contributors.

FGMDA is also is the recipient of three Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals (CAHP) Awards: the Award of Merit for Conservation (Recording, Preservation, Rehabilitation) of the Oriel Window of the Grand Trunk Building; an Award of Merit for Conservation (Restoration) of the McGill University Arts Building; and the Award of Merit in Heritage Planning for the exhibit and event held at their head office for the Design Montreal Open House, which occurred in May 2013.

The partners of FGMDA are Adjunct Professor Julia Gersovitz (B.Arch. 1975), Alain Fournier (B.Arch. 1975), Rosanne Moss (B.Arch. 1980), and Georges Drolet (B.Arch. 1984).

 

Adrian Sheppard awarded Ordre des urbanistes du Québec prize

On the occasion of its 50th anniversary, the Ordre des urbanistes du Québec (OUQ) awarded the Blanche-Lemco-Van-Ginkel Prize to 30 public figures in a variety of fields for their contribution to the development of urban planning in Quebec. Emeritus Professor Adrian Sheppard was amongst the prize recipients at the gala held at the Palais des congrès in Montreal on October 23, 2013. The citation reads as follows:

“M. Sheppard est un pionnier dans le domaine de l’urbanisme et de l’architecture urbaine. Ce véritable passionné de design a, au cours de sa carrière, oeuvré à la mise en valeur et à la protection des bâtiments anciens significatifs ainsi qu’à la planification urbaine de nombreux projets phares et primés de Montréal, dont le Square-Victoria et les Cours Le Royer dans le Vieux-Montréal.

“Ce professeur émérite de l’Université McGill a fortement contribué à sensibiliser plusieurs générations de professionnels à l’importance du patrimoine, de l’architecture urbaine et de l’urbanisme de par son enseignement, son implication communautaire, mais également par la rédaction de plusieurs ouvrages sur le sujet.”

For the full text of the press release issued by the OUQ, please see here.

For the full list of prize winners, please see here.

 

School of Architecture professional program highlighted in Spacing

The undergraduate and graduate programs at the School have been highlighted by Spacing magazine (Fall 2013) as producing top graduates.  The Toronto-based publication surveyed more than 120 “professional city builders” on the abilities of graduates in Urban Planning, Architecture and Architectural Studies, and Landscape and Environmental Design. The citations for McGill read as follows:

Undergraduate: “Faculty availability, studio space, and other resources are rated best-in-class.  Graduates carry a good reputation when it comes to design and building science.”

Graduate: “McGill’s course offerings tend to revolve around either housing or sustainable design.  McGill students have won many high profile awards recently, including the Chicago-based Burnham Prize, the Phyllis Lambert Prize, and the top five prizes at the 18th inter-university Charrette.”

Other architecture programs cited in the undergraduate category were Waterloo, Carleton, and Ryerson.  Graduate programs listed alongside us are Toronto, Waterloo, and UBC.

The issue also praises the “Making Megaprojects Work for Communities” course in the School of Urban Planning and includes an interview with Prof. Annmarie Adams about the role of Montreal in the McGill curriculum and new trends in architectural education.

Spacing (Fall 2013), page 49

 

Martin Bressani Receives SSHRC Insight Grant

Prof. Martin Bressani has been awarded a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Insight Grant in the amount of $248,093 (over five years). The title of his research is “Architecture and the Environmental Tradition: The Atmospheric in British Architecture from 1750 to 1850.” The co-applicants on the project are Jodey C. Castricano (UBC), Marc Grignon (Laval), and Nicholas Roquet (U de M). The collaborators are Profs. Annmarie Adams and Aaron Sprecher, both of McGill.

“The research program investigates the rise of a new sensibility to ambiance, atmosphere, and aerial phenomena in British architecture and garden design between 1750 and 1850, in order to further our understanding of the concept of environment in its historical complexity. In our age of global warming, when the weather increasingly becomes a hybrid of the man-made and the natural, the history of a weather-borne aesthetics acquires special interest, identifying when and how the “air” became a locus of cultural politics. Our project seeks to define the stages and the precise modalities through which emerged an enhanced understanding of the connection between the physical properties of things, people, and space, and the emotional atmospheres they generate.” (Martin Bressani)

The full list of SSHRC Insight Grant winners for 2012 can be found here.

 

Ipek Türeli Receives SSHRC Insight Development Grant

Prof. Ipek Türeli has been awarded a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Insight Development Grant in the amount of $54,859 (over two years). She will research the topic of “Building Architectural Networks: American Missionary Schools in the Eastern Mediterranean,” for which she had received earlier in the year an FQRSC grant in the amount of $39,600 (for over three years). The FQRSC-funded first part of the research will study the earliest of the overseas American college campuses in Istanbul, and the SSHRC-funded part will focus on "Spatializing the Missionary Encounter in Izmir and Beirut," in collaboration with Prof. Sibel Zandi-Sayek of the College of William and Mary.

The full list of SSHRC Insight Development Grant winners for 2013 can be found here.

 

Mitacs Elevate Award to Bassem Eid Mohamed

Bassem Eid Mohammed (Ph.D. 2014) will be supported as a postdoctoral fellow by the Mitacs Elevate program, beginning in February 2014. The award is for one year, in the amount of $57,000, under the supervision of Prof. Aaron Sprecher, co-supervised by Prof. Temy Tidafi of UdeM, and in collaboration with industry partner  Bone Structure. The project will explore the application of digital design tools and techniques towards the implementation of a computer-based mass customization platform for prefabricated housing.

The Mitacs Elevate program supports postdoctoral fellows and Canadian companies and partners to collaborate on cutting-edge research projects and to build capacity for the next generation of R&D management leaders.

 

RAIC Award of Excellence to KANVA

The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC) has given a 2013 Award of Excellence in the category Innovation in Architecture to KANVA Architecture Management R&D for their project Irène in Montreal.  KANVA was co-founded by Rami Bebawi (B.Sc.Arch. 1999, M.Arch. 2001) and Tudor Radulescu (B.Sc.Arch. 1998, M.Arch. 2001).

From the award citation: "The urban housing project, Irène, located in Montreal’s borough, St-Henri, brands the innovative exterior building envelope as the iconic persona of the project. The curtain protecting the three-storey addition floats above the existing two-storey brick structure and is created from customized perforated aluminum panel. Drawing an analogy with a theatrical curtain, the metal perforation acts equally to veil and to reveal the activity within, serving a performative function that adds a touch of spectacle to the neighbourhood. Irène substantiates the incorporation of a poetic concept in conjunction with a challenging technical innovation giving rise to a functional, viable and aesthetic project."

For full details, please see the RAIC webpage for this award.

 

Two New Professors: David Newton and David Theodore

We are delighted to announce the hiring of two new full-time faculty colleagues.

David Newton will join the School of Architecture as an Assistant Professor on August 1, 2013, fulfilling the position in design technologies. In the fall he will co-teach in the M1 studio and teach Advanced Construction. An accomplished design teacher with a demonstrated expertise in building technologies, Prof. Newton is especially interested in algorithmic design processes, digital fabrication and biomimicry. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Design from Arizona State University, where he is currently a Clinical Assistant Professor, and a Masters in Architecture from Rice University. In 2006-07, he worked for Diller Scofidio + Renfro on High Line Park in New York.

On August 1, 2014, Assistant Professor David Theodore will join the School. David received his professional degree and a post-professional Masters (Governor General’s Gold Medal 2001) from McGill University more than ten years ago. His record of peer-review publications and external funding is extensive; and he writes architectural criticism regularly for professional and popular magazines. David is currently finishing a combined ad hoc Ph.D. as a Trudeau Scholar at Harvard University in architecture and history of science. His dissertation, “Hospitalizing the Computer: Biomedicine, Architecture, Computation,” moves across cybernetics, medical informatics, automation, neurosurgery and neuroscience, digital and interactive art and even cyborg and robot, examining how medical and architectural practice both responded to and drove the ascendance of computer culture. He plans to defend his dissertation in December 2013. At McGill, David will coordinate the M1 studios.

Thanks to everyone who participated in this year’s search process, especially the search committee, which was chaired by Prof. Martin Bressani and included Prof. Vikram Bhatt, Newsha Ghaeli, David Krawitz, Prof. Nik Luka, Prof. Damiano Pasini (Mechanical Engineering), and Prof. Ipek Türeli.

 

Concours d’idées en design urbain: Pôle muséal du quartier Montcalm - Elisabeth Bouchard

Ph.D. student Elisabeth Bouchard and partner Eric Boucher have won first prize in the Concours d’idées en design urbain: Pôle muséal du quartier Montcalm. The urban design competition was launched in Quebec City at the end of April and the winners were announced at a press conference at the Musée National de Beaux-Arts du Québec on June 13, 2013. Open to registered architects (members of the OAQ), the program asked for a unifying signature for the Montcalm neighborhood in view of the completion of the new pavilion of the MNBAQ designed by OMA. Three prizes and an honorable mention were awarded. The first prize carried an award of $20,000.

For full details on the competition, please read the official press release.

To view the project, please visit the website of Eric Boucher Architecte.

 

Raymond Moriyama Receives Honorary Doctorate from University of Calgary

Raymond Moriyama (M.Arch. 1957, D.Sc. 1993) has received an honorary doctorate from the University of Calgary. From the website of the Faculty of Environmental Design at U of C: "The Faculty of Environmental Design (EVDS) celebrates the lifetime achievements of distinguished Canadian architect, Raymond Moriyama, with an honorary doctorate and public event on Monday, June 10, 2013. Moriyama is one of Canada’s most celebrated architects and considered by many a hero for rising above his past as a former internee of camps during the Second World War, due to his Japanese heritage. As this year’s graduating architects, planners and environmental designers from EVDS walk the stage at the Jack Simpson Gym on Monday, they will be joined by Moriyama as he receives an honorary doctorate from the faculty.

"Throughout his extensive career as partner with Moriyama & Teshima Architects, Moriyama has produced many significant works of Canadian architecture, including the Bata Shoe Museum, Ontario Science Centre, Toronto Reference Library, Canadian Embassy in Tokyo, and the Canadian War Museum. His work is published widely and has won many awards including the Confederation of Canada Medal and the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Gold Medal.

"Following the formal convocation ceremony, EVDS will celebrate the life’s work of Moriyama with two free public events. The first event — a symposium panel discussion featuring Raymond Moriyama, Ian Chodikoff, former editor of Canadian Architect, and Diarmuid Nash, Partner at Moriyama & Teshima Architects, moderated by Professor Graham Livesey — will take place at the Husky Oil Great Hall at the Rosza Centre from 2-4 pm. 'This is a rare opportunity to meet one of Canada’s architectural legends,' says Liyan Wong, a recent graduate of the EVDS Masters of Architecture program, responsible for the co-ordination of the Moriyama events. The second event, a gallery opening and reception featuring the original work of Moriyama, will be displayed in both physical and digital forms. It will be the first time much of these works will be seen by the public. The gallery opening will take place in EVDS Kasian Gallery in the Professional Faculties building, room 2145 from 5-6:30 pm. 'I am very excited to hear him speak about his career and work, especially after the privilege of helping to select the work that will be shown in the EVDS gallery,' notes Wong. 'This collection dates from Moriyama’s career from the 1950 to 1970s, and I know that the public will find it truly remarkable for its forwardness, diversity, and aesthetic strength.'"

 

Two Recent Graduates Win Burnham Prize Competition

Recent post-professional graduates, Bahareh Atash and Hesam T. Rostami (M.Arch. 2012), have won first prize with their submission "Form vs. Uniform" in the 2013 Burnham Prize Competition, "Next Stop: Designing Chicago BRT Stations." The single-stage international design ideas competition intended to catalyze iconic, sustainable, and functional design for representative corridors in Chicago’s planned Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system. It received 42 submissions from 14 countries.

For full details and to view the winning schemes, please see the website of the Chicago Architectural Club.

 

Rafico Ruiz Awarded CCA Residency

The Canadian Centre for Architecture’s Curatorial Committee recently awarded Ph.D. student Rafico Ruiz a two-month residency as part of the CCA’s Collection Research Grants Program open to doctoral students enrolled in all Canadian universities and selected universities in the United States and Europe. While at the CCA, Rafico will pursue research related to the CCA’s important holdings on early examples of “marginal” modern architecture in Canada from roughly 1910-1940. He aims to build a comprehensive portrait of the emergence of an early modern architecture in Canada through such “marginal” sites and institutional influences as missions in northern Newfoundland and Labrador to the Canadian military’s presence in the Atlantic provinces.

 

Alberto Pérez-Gómez Co-applicant on SSHRC Partnership Grant

Prof. Alberto Pérez-Gómez is a co-applicant on the SSHRC Partnership Grant, “Forms of conversion: religion, culture, and cognitive ecologies in early modern Europe and its worlds” ($2,297,800 over 6 years). Prof. Paul Yachnin (Tomlinson Professor of Shakespeare Studies, Dept. of English) is the principal investigator.

From the project description on the website of IPLAI (Institute for the Public Life of Art and Ideas): “The Conversions project will develop an historical understanding that will enlighten modern debates about corporeal, sexual, psychological, political and spiritual kinds of transformation. The project will study how early modern Europeans changed their confessional, social, political, and even sexual identities. These subjective changes were of a piece with transformations in their world—the geopolitical reorientation of Europe in light of emerging relations with Islam and the Americas; the rethinking and the translation of the knowledge of Greek and Latin Antiquity, Christianity, Judaism, and Islam; changes in and changing uses of the built environment; the reimagining of God. […]

”Led by McGill’s Institute for the Public Life of Arts and Ideas (IPLAI), the project is partnering with eighteen research centres in Canada, USA, England, and Australia. The partners will work together toward a rethinking of early modern Europe as an ‘age of conversion.’ The project will involve younger scholars, other scholars, artists, and members of the public. The four artistic partners will develop creative programs in collaboration with the project and take part in workshops that will inspire audiences to think creatively and historically about the possibility that we might be entering a new great age of conversion. The project’s ability to engage with multiple public audiences will depend first of all on the coherence of the story it has to tell about conversion as an agent of historical change. The artistic partners will be crucial to the coherence and appeal of that story, especially since the performing arts are themselves forms of historical research, experiential ways of understanding the lines of connection between the past and the world of modernity.”

The full list of SSHRC Partnership Grant winners for 2012 can be found here.

 

Prof. Martin Bressani Receives Teaching Award and Francis Ng Receives TA Award

At a ceremony on May 16, 2013, following the final Faculty meeting of the academic year, Interim Dean Andrew Kirk presented the Engineering Class of 1944 Teaching Award to Prof. Martin Bressani. Dean Kirk also presented the Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award to professional M.Arch. student Francis Ng. The Director of the School, Prof. Annmarie Adams, was on hand to celebrate the double win, along with Profs. Aaron Sprecher, Nik Luka and Ipek Türeli, administrative staff members Marcia King, David Krawitz and Mary Lanni-Campoli, and student Don Toromanoff.

 Prof. Martin Bressani receives teaching award from Interim Dean Andrew Kirk (Owe

Francis Ng receives TA award from Interim Dean Andrew Kirk (Owen Egan)

School of Architecture gang celebrates awards (Owen Egan)

 

Francois Leblanc Awarded SSHRC Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship

Ph.D. student Francois Leblanc has been awarded a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship (Doctoral) for a duration of three years and a total amount of $105,000. The title of the doctoral research project is “Robots in architecture: merging design optimization with additive manufacturing technology.” An abstract of the project follows.

Advances in computation and robotic technology now enable the programming of construction tasks, such as the manufacturing of precise and complex forms. Additive manufacturing or “3D printing” technology provides new capabilities to reform and enhance the design of optimized forms and material variations for architectural performance and artistic expression. How can 3D printing facilitate the design and production of complex and optimized structures that were previously inconceivable? How can this technology effectively optimize the amount of material used in construction with a precise distribution of material?

 

Ioana Teodorescu Wins Phyllis Lambert Prize

Ioana Teodorescu (Ph.D. 2013) has won the Phyllis Lambert Prize for 2012. The prize is awarded annually by UQAM’s Canada Research Chair on Urban Heritage to a candidate who has submitted the best doctoral dissertation on the subject of architecture and architectural history in Canada, based on the assessment of an independent jury. This prize honours Phyllis Lambert, architect and tutelary figure of architectural conservation, founder of the Canadian Centre for Architecture. Teodorescu won for her dissertation entitled Building Small Houses in Postwar Canada: Architects, Homeowners and Bureaucratic Ideals, 1947-1974.

 

Montréal ZERO Inc. (Sevag Pogharian) awarded support from Natural Resources Canada’s ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative

On May 3, 2013, Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced support of more than $82 million through Natural Resources Canada’s ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative (ecoEII) for 55 innovative projects across Canada. Of these, 15 will be pre-commercialization demonstration projects to test the feasibility of various technologies, and 40 will be research and development projects to address knowledge gaps and bring technologies from the conceptual stage to the ready-to-be-tested stage of development. One of the research and development projects selected for support is “Plug and Play Building-Integrated Photovoltaic and Thermal (BIPV-T) Technologies,” which will receive $522,170. The lead proponent is Montréal ZERO Inc. whose founder and president is Sevag Pogharian (B.Arch. 1986). Sevag teaches the course Energy, Environment and Buildings (ARCH 377) at the School.

The Building Integrated Photovoltaic and Thermal (BIPV-T) system is a technology which merges photovoltaic and thermal systems, simultaneously providing both electric and thermal energy. The goal of this project is to conceptualize, develop and test prototypes of BIPV-T collectors appropriate for cold climate housing and building applications. Montréal ZERO will work closely with industry partners, solar system installers and academic institutes to develop and field test BIPV-T systems. The results will help establish standardized BIPV-T modules for energy efficient housing and buildings.

For full details, please see the announcement on the Prime Minister’s website.

 

Manon Asselin Architecte + JLP Architectes Win MMFA Competition

The consortium of Manon Asselin Architecte + Jodoin Lamarre Pratte Architectes has won the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts' architectural competition to design its new fifth pavilion. Manon Asselin (B.Arch. 1992, M.Arch. 2001) is co-founder, with her partner Katsuhiro Yamazaki (B.Arch. 1996), of Atelier TAG. They were Gerald Sheff Visiting Professors in Architecture at the School during the Fall 2012 term. Other key members on the Atelier TAG team who are McGill alumni include Pawel Karwowski (B.Arch. 1996), Mathieu Lemieux-Blanchard (B.Sc.[Arch.] 2004), Conor Sampson (B.Arch. 1996), and Éole Sylvain Hupé (M.Arch. 2011).  Sergio de la Cuadra, of JLP, is currently studying Professional Practice at the School.

From the MMFA press release of April 25, 2013: "Last December, in the presence of Maka Kotto, Quebec’s Ministre de la Culture et des Communications, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) announced an architectural competition for the design of its new fifth pavilion. After a rigorous two-stage selection process, the jury unanimously entrusted the design of the new wing to the Manon Asselin architecte + Jodoin Lamarre Pratte architectes consortium. Details of the project, maquettes and photos will be unveiled to the public and the media at a special presentation on Montreal Museums Day, Sunday, May 26, at the MMFA. [...] The Museum’s Pavilion of International Art will house not only its collection of international art from the Old Masters to modern works but also and most notably the collection donated by Michal and Renata Hornstein. The new wing, to open in 2017, will affirm yet again the architectural excellence of Montreal, a UNESCO City of Design, and feature as one of the highlights of the city’s 375th anniversary."

For full details, please see the MMFA's press release.

 

Ipek Türeli receives FQRSC grant

Prof. Ipek Türeli has been awarded a Fonds Québécois de la Recherche sur la Société et la Culture (FQRSC, Quebec Fund for Research, Society and Culture) grant in the amount of $39,600 (over three years). She will research the topic of “Building Architectural Networks: American Missionary Schools in the Eastern Mediterranean.”

North American Protestant missionaries have profoundly shaped American and Canadian perceptions of the "non-West" -- and vice versa. Yet today little is known about their pioneering efforts overseas in providing modern social services and institutions. U.S.-based missionaries established hundreds of schools in the Ottoman Empire from the mid-nineteenth century on. Several of these, such as today's Bogazici University in Istanbul and the American University in Beirut, offered secular education in spectacular campus settings. These schools, which remain influential within the region, were funded by North American benefactors and designed by well-known North American architects, such as Alfred D. Hamlin, George B. Post and Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge, but they were also necessarily built from local materials, by local craftsmen and workers. What role did architecture play in the context of missionary encounters? This project studies the spatial forms their educational activity took on. It considers buildings as 'moving objects' which start at the level of idea, or proposal, and continue to move after they are built, enabling a flexible and open platform for dynamic participation and action. It proposes to look at missionary schools not only as environments of (formal, passive) learning but of knowledge production about other cultures. The FQRSC-funded first part of the research, which will focus on the earliest of these overseas college campuses, Robert College of Istanbul (1863) and its sister school, Constantinople College for Girls (1871), represents a first step toward the larger research goal to analyse the network of missionary schools in the Ottoman Empire.

 

Lyceum Fellowship in Architecture

McGill third-year undergraduate student Wan Lu has received a Citation award in the Lyceum Fellowship in Architecture competition. Three other U3 students received three of four Merit awards: Guillaume Tiravy, Julia Chang and Zhongyuan Dai. The McGill submissions were projects developed in the U3 studio of Profs. Howard Davies, Ipek Türeli, Sinisha Brdar and Andrew King.

The Lyceum Fellowship was established in 1985 to advance the development of the next generation of talent by creating a vehicle for stimulating perceptive reasoning and inspiring creative thought in architecture. Through a unique structure of design competition and prize winning travel grants it seeks to establish a dialogue through design among selected schools of architecture. The Lyceum Competition welcomes submissions from students attending one of the 14 participating schools. This year's competition theme was "Here and Now: A Call to Action." Students were asked to identify a socio-political problem in their communities, research the topic through engagement with the community and other means, develop an architectural program addressing the problem, map the story to the site, and compose a travel itinerary that expands on and explores these ideas.

For additional information on the 2013 competition, please visit the Lyceum website.

 

Lateral Office exhibition on Nunavut will represent Canada at Venice Biennale

“Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15” has been selected through a national juried competition to represent Canada at the 2014 Venice Biennale in Architecture, the Canada Council for the Arts and the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC) announced today. The exhibition will be organized and curated by Lateral Office of Toronto. Lateral Office was founded in 2003 by Lola Sheppard (B.Arch. 1995) and Mason White as an experimental design practice. It is dedicated to architecture that poses questions and responds to the wider context and climate of a project – social, ecological or political.  One of the five design team collaborators is Fournier Gersovitz Moss Drolet Architectes Associés (Montreal).

As Nunavut celebrates its 15th anniversary in 2014, “Arctic Adaptations” will present innovative architecture proposals rooted in Nunavut’s distinct land, climate and culture, reflecting local traditions of migration, mobility and seasonality. It will also explore how, in light of dramatic environmental, social and economic forces that are transforming the Arctic today, architecture might help nurture robust, prosperous and vibrant Northern communities. The Venice Biennale in Architecture is the world’s most prestigious architecture exhibition and competition. It takes place in Venice, Italy from June 7 to November 23, 2014, and will receive more than 350,000 visitors. 

For the full text of the announcement, please see the Canada Council webpage.

For information on "Arctic Adaptations," please visit the website.

For an article in The Globe and Mail (26 March 2013) by James Adams, please see here.

For an article in Arch Daily (28 March 2013) by Pamela Porada, please see here.

 

Five out of Seven Prizes to McGill at 18th Interuniversity Charrette

Students at the School have won five of the seven prizes awarded at the 18th Interuniversity Charrette on February 25, 2013. First Prize was shared by two teams, both from McGill: The Cloud (Fouzi Ouadhi, Razvan Gheti, Sarah Wu Martinez, Luis Orozco and Zhiyao Chen) and Antidote (Hubert Lemieux, Alexandre Lapierre and Kim Landry). McGill also won two of the four Special Mentions: Rêves Souterrains – Sunken Dreamlands (Naomi Hébert, Ji Won Jun and Sara-Jeanne Dagenais) and Immortal Citizen (Julia Chang, Jennifer Lai, Meng Nan Zhang, Patrick Zhang and Gary Lin). The other two mentions were won by teams from Laval and UQAM. McGill also won the Public Prize for Je Me Souviendrai (Amalie Lambert, Mark Lien, Ivy Wong and Maëna André).

The 18th Interuniversity Charrette Transmutation invited young designers to question the future of the city in the age of information technologies. Transmutation encouraged the production of new modes of representation of Montreal and the city’s ability to transform according to economic transactions, social distributions, and political actions.

The Charrette was organized by the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) and McGill University (Prof. Aaron Sprecher), in collaboration with Université de Montréal, Université du Québec à Montréal, and with the participation of Université Laval, Carleton University, Ryerson University and University of Toronto.

Full details on the charrette and the prize-winning submissions can be viewed on the CCA website.

 

IRHA Award: Michael Jemtrud

Professor Michael Jemtrud is the winner of this year's Institut de recherche en histoire de l'architecture (IRHA) $25,000 award ("Opening up the disciplines: Innovative approaches to the built environment") for his project The Working Models Forum: A Fabricating Aesthetics Initiative. Collaborators include Professor Alanna Thain (McGill), Maria Mingallon (Arup), Maxime Moreau (Open Form Architecture), Jason Crow and Philam Nguyen (McGill). Additional participants, dates and event venues will be determined.

The Working Models Forum: A Fabricating Aesthetics Initiative explores the impact of how emerging digital fabrication and prototyping technologies for producing efficient structural systems can perform as modes of inquiry with regard to our theoretical and embodied perception of the built environment. The idea that technique, in itself, is a mode of interrogation and knowledge production in relation to dominant theoretical models such as the environmental, biomorphic, biomimetic, and parametric is at the core of the research project. In other words, the research proposes to design and fabricate utilizing three contemporary digital design and fabrication methodologies. By studying and comparing the same form as it is developed utilizing divergent techniques, the project will highlight and test beyond material efficiency the impact of emerging architectural practices for creating our built environment. The key question asked is how does the development of a theoretical rationalization for a certain technique (one specific mode of inquiry) relate to the application of that technique in practice (a second and alternate mode of inquiry). The project leverages current and ongoing research within Facility for Architectural Research in Media and Mediation (FARMM) and a SSHRC Research-Creation Grant in Fine Arts entitled Modelling the Methodologies of Our Time (2011-14). Professor Jemtrud is currently on sabbatical (2012-13) and is a Resident Fellow at the McGill Institute for the Public Life of Arts and Ideas (IPLAI) (2012-14).

 

Warming Huts Competition: Atelier Big City

The winners of the Warming Huts v.2013: An Art + Architecture Competition on Ice have been announced. Three huts were chosen from the open submission process; one was selected from a separate University of Manitoba competition, and yet another is being designed, and built in Winnipeg, by Atelier Big City (Adjunct Professor Howard Davies, Randy Cohen and Anne Cormier, all B.Arch. 1982). Endorsed by the Manitoba Association of Architects, the competition received over 100 entries this year. Jury members selected designs that best “push the envelope of design, craft and art.”

From Canadian Architect: "Atelier Big City’s design emphasizes keeping warm together. The great open-air gathering space is inviting and receptive, welcoming skaters in for a moment of rest. The simple yet grand structure out on this natural rink is a hovering silhouette, somewhat blurred into the colours of the ice and snowy winter setting. Finished in Tyvec, a material inevitably linked with things to come, the scale of the warming hut is larger than life to imitate the wide open space surrounding it. A true beau geste of a building – part mirage, part air, a skeleton of everyday construction aspiring to create a place. Big City’s construction can be compared to a giant thick blanket, with the layers filled with air, forming an insulating layer, giving form to the hut, absorbing the sun's warmth, hopefully creating a brief pause in the cold winter skate."

For full details, please see the article in Canadian Architect and the competition website.

Big City (Atelier Big City)

 

Crossing Borders Competition

Recent (2012) M.Arch. (professional) graduates Marie-Ève Lamarre and Caileigh MacKellar have won an Honourable Mention in the competition Crossing Borders – Design Responses to Global Issues in the Developing World for their project "Off the Wall, Jacmel, Haiti," developed in the summer studio taught by Francisca Insulza at the School during May and June of 2012. The contest invited students and alumni from Ontario design schools to submit school projects that illustrate the active role that designers can play in conceiving sustainable strategies within communities in the developing world. Architecture, landscape, urban planning, and interior design projects of any scale were welcome.

The jury included Ian Chodikoff, Adrian Blackwell, Luna Khirfan, Mauricio Quiros Pacheco, Sean Kelly, and Taymoore Balbaa. The winning entries will be exhibited in a show at the Larry Wayne Richards Gallery of the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design at the University of Toronto. The competition was hosted by Architecture for Humanity and the Daniels Faculty.

For full details, please see the news webpage of the Daniels Faculty site.

 

Ice Hotel 2013: First Prize to McGill

A team of four students from the School has won first prize in the Architecture Éphémère competition at the Ice Hotel in Quebec City for the design of their room, "I Love Lamp." The winning students from the professional M.Arch. program - Newsha Ghaeli, Naomi Hébert, Brian Muthaliff and Maria Nikolova - received their prize at the opening of the Ice Hotel on Friday 18 January 2013 from Serge Péloquin, Artistic Director, and René Champagne, standing in for the Président d'honneur of the competition, Gilles Saucier.

Students from the schools of architecture and design at Laval, McGill, U de M and UQAM were invited to design a room in snow and ice for the Ice Hotel, and over 30 teams made submissions. The team from UQAM received second prize and the team from Laval came in third. The three winning teams all had their designs built as rooms at the Ice Hotel.

McGill team at Ice Hotel opening night, receiving first prize (David Krawitz)

 

2012 Canadian Architect Awards of Excellence

Canadian Architect has announced the winners of the 2012 Awards of Excellence, given each year to architects and architecture graduates for buildings in the design stage. One of only two national award programs devoted exclusively to architecture, the Awards of Excellence have recognized significant building projects in Canada on an annual basis since 1968. This year's winners were selected by a jury consisting of Donald Chong of Williamson Chong Architects in Toronto, Marie-Chantal Croft of Coarchitecture in Quebec City, and Bruce Haden of DIALOG in Vancouver. Awards are given for architectural design excellence. Jurors considered response to the program, site, geographical and social context, and evaluated physical organization, structure, materials and environmental features. Nine Awards of Excellence were given, including the following to School alumni and teachers:

Atelier Big City (Adjunct Professor Howard Davies, Randy Cohen and Anne Cormier, all B.Arch. 1982), Fichten Soiferman et Associés (Jacob Fichten, B.Arch. 1967; Gerald Soiferman, B.Arch. 1963), L’OEUF (Bernard Olivier, B.Arch. 1992, M.Arch. 1997; Danny Pearl, B.Arch. 1986; Morgan Carter, Course Lecturer) for the Centre Culturel de Notre-Dame-de-Grâce in Montreal, Quebec.

L’OEUF for the House in Four Fields in La Conception, Quebec.

Paul Laurendeau (B.Arch. 1991) | Francois R Beauchesne | Architectes en Consortium for the Ampthithéâtre Trois-Rivières sur Saint-Laurent in Trois-Rivières, Quebec.

T B A | Thomas Balaban Architecte (B.Arch. 1995) for the Spa Le St-Jude in Montreal, Quebec.

 

Ice Hotel 2013

A team of four students from the professional M.Arch. program - Newsha Ghaeli, Naomi Hébert, Brian Muthaliff and Maria Nikolova - is amongst the three finalists in the Architecture Éphémère competition of the Ice Hotel in Quebec City. Students from the schools of architecture and design at Laval, McGill, U de M and UQAM were invited to design a room in snow and ice for the Ice Hotel, and over 30 teams made submissions. The projects of the three finalists will be built, and the overall winner will be announced at the opening of the Ice Hotel on January 18, 2013.

For full details, please see the press release.

 

Les Mérites d'architecture de la Ville de Québec - Elisabeth Bouchard

Ph.D. student Elisabeth Bouchard and partner Eric Boucher have won a prize in the Mérites d'architecture de la Ville de Québec competition for their Bilodeau-Larrivée project. The residential renovation and addition, located in the heart of the St-Jean-Baptiste neighborhood, was recognized for the successful relationship between the existing 1910 building and the contemporary expansion.

For photos and further details, please visit the competition webpage.

 

Lauréate du Fonds Société et culture - Frederika Eilers

Ph.D. student Frederika Eilers has won an Étudiants-chercheurs étoiles award in the Fonds Société et culture category from the Fonds de recherche du Québec for her publication, "Barbie versus Modulor: Ideal Bodies, Buildings, and Typical Users," published in Girlhood Studies (Berghahn Journals) volume 5, issue 1, 07-2012. The award comes with a $1,000 prize.

For full details, please visit the awards webpage.

 

Urban Design and Housing option highlighted in Azure

The Urban Design and Housing (UDH) option in the post-professional M.Arch. program at the School has been highlighted by Azure magazine (November/December 2012) as ranking amongst the leading design and architecture programs in North America.  The criteria for inclusion in Azure's listing are as follows: "We polled architects and designers across Canada and the U.S. and heard from top professionals regarding the strongest bachelor's and master's programs.  Our listings highlight over 40 schools that offer a unique, innovation-oriented education."  The magazine "looks at which schools offer the most in terms of hands-on collaboration, groundbreaking technology and inspiring faculty."

The section profiling the UDH option at McGill reads as follows: "McGill's hands-on urban design specialization in the architecture graduate school views Montreal as its workshop.  It collaborates with the local government on research initiatives about how urban design helps shape metropolitan areas.  Students are currently exploring ways to improve the St-Viateur neighbourhood and make it more accessible for pedestrians and cyclists."

Azure (November/December 2012, page 72)

 

Raymond-Lévesque Library: Facteur D Award for Architecture

The Facteur D Award for Architecture has been awarded to the Ville de Longueuil, Manon Asselin, and Jodoin Lamarre Pratte (JLP), architects in consortium, for the Raymond-Lévesque Library. The design team included Asselin (architect, project manager), Katsuhiro Yamazaki (designer), and Tom Balaban (architect, designer) for Manon Asselin architecte, as well as Nicolas Ranger (operation manager) and Michel Bourassa (construction supervisor) for JLP et associés architectes. Asselin and Yamazaki are currently Gerald Sheff Visiting Professors in Architecture at the School, and Balaban has been an Adjunct Professor. All three are McGill graduates.

From the Facteur D website: "Facteur D is a unique event concept focused on showing companies and public organizations the economic and social benefits of investing in quality architecture, design and planning. Facteur D is reinventing the design award paradigm, analysing not only the aesthetic and technical factors, but the direct economic and social value of the project for the client."

The Raymond-Lévesque Library was one of seven finalists in the Architecture category (one of seven design categories) in the Facteur D Awards. For further information and photos of the Raymond-Lévesque Library, please visit the awards webpage.

 

ContemPLAY Pavilion: Prix d'Excellence de la construction en acier

The ContemPLAY Pavilion has won a Prix d'Excellence de la construction en acier, in the category Projets Jeunes Architectes - Ingenieurs, from the Canadian Institute of Steel Construction (CISC) / L'Institut Canadien de la construction en acier (ICCA). The prize was awarded at Le 4e Rendez-vous de l'acier (La Beauté de l'acier) at the Centre de Congrès Palace in Laval, Quebec, on September 27, 2012. The award-winning student members of the team from the School are: Hamza Alhbian, Simon Bastien, Justin Boulanger, Elisa Costa, Evguenia Chevtchenko, Nicolas Demers-Stoddart, Andrew Hruby, Olga Karpova, Shelley Ludman, Diandra Maselli, Courtney Posel, Dina Safonova, Dieter Toews, and Sophie Wilkin. Also cited were: ARUP, Groupe CANAM, Proto Plus Précision Aciers, and Altitubes Inc. Corbec.

The award citation reads as follows: "Le projet de pavillon ContemPLAY est une excellente démonstration du programme DRS à l’Université McGill, car il permet aux étudiants l’intégration et la synchronisation de théories architecturales contemporaines à la tectonique constructive. Le projet s’inscrit dans le cadre du cours Community Design Workshop offert aux étudiants finissants à la maîtrise professionnelle en architecture à l’Université McGill. Pour des raisons de performance et d’esthétisme, la structure du projet est hybride, soit composée d’acier et de bois. Ainsi, parallèlement à nos intentions de départ, travailler avec une structure hybride nous a permis d’explorer différentes matérialités et d’approfondir nos connaissances sur les caractéristiques propres de chacun de ces matériaux, et ce entre la phase conception et la phase fabrication. La force structurale de l’acier, son potentiel de manipulation et de transformation formelle corrélaient avec le design recherché."

For full details, please visit the awards website.

For further information on the pavilion, please visit the ContemPLAY website.

 

inFormed Consent: Projects from Open Source Architecture

WUHO Gallery | September 08-28
6518 Hollywood Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90028

The convergence of computational technologies has accelerated the ability to utilize multiple streams of data and information in the formation of an architectural entity. A common computational platform promotes transdiscplinary collaborations and the near seamless incorporation of a wide range of input into the design process, which enables near infinite iterations. The extensity available and ease of technological integration calls into question the value of the selected information and data sets and as well as the status of the architectural form. InFormed Consent is an exhibition that examines a selected series of experimental research and commissioned projects from Open Source Architecture (Chandler Ahrens, Eran Neuman and Aaron Sprecher) that uses diverse, yet strategic data and information to inform the design process.

This exhibition of recent projects by OSA was made possible with the support of LIPHE Research Lab at McGill University’s School of Architecture. Special thanks to Francois Leblanc and Kristen Too (McGill University) for their important assistance.

 

ACSA/AISC Steel Design Student Competition

Two students from the professional M.Arch. program, Marilina Cianci and Yekaterina Artemchuk, under the supervision of faculty sponsor Sinisha Brdar, have been awarded an Honorable Mention in the open category of the 2011-12 Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) / American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Steel Design Student Competition for their project INTERTWINE: An Energy Resource Machine and Wildlife Habitat for Maldives.

The twelfth annual steel design student competition was administered by the ACSA and sponsored by the AISC. The program was intended to challenge students, working individually or in teams, to explore a variety of design issues related to the use of steel in design and construction. Steel had to be used as the primary structural material and contain at least one space that required long-span steel structure, with special emphasis placed on innovation in steel design.

For full information on the competition, please visit the ACSA website.

INTERTWINE (Marilina Cianci and Yekaterina Artemchuk)

 

Max Stern McCord Museum Fellowship

Ph.D. student Rafico Ruiz has been awarded the Institute for the Public Life of Arts and Ideas (IPLAI) Max Stern McCord Museum Fellowship for 2012-2013 to consult the McCord's photographic archives that relate to travel and practices of surveying in the Subarctic and Arctic off the North Atlantic. As a Max Stern McCord Museum Fellow, Ruiz will piece together a critical history of the practices of photographic surveying in northern Newfoundland and Labrador in the first four decades of the twentieth century. Along with a study of the nascent co-operative movement in the region, the Mission's development of early forms of philanthropy at the nexus with social Darwinist ideologies, and the building of the British Empire's most modern hospital on one of its outermost margins, in St. Anthony, Newfoundland, the Forbes-Grenfell-Berchem-Mack-Notman projects of collection and surveying will make up a crucial contribution to his media history of the Grenfell Mission of Newfoundland and Labrador.  The fellowship has a value of $20,000.

The McCord Museum and IPLAI invited applications from meritorious McGill graduate students in the Faculty of Arts whose research directly involves the collections of the McCord Museum and reflects IPLAI’s interest in innovative, interdisciplinary scholarship. Preference was given to doctoral candidates who will have completed their coursework and comprehensive exams, but Masters students writing theses were also considered. The McCord Museum’s collections of 1,440,000 objects, images, and documents are an unparalleled resource for the study of the social history and material culture of Montreal, Quebec, and Canada. Its Ethnology and Archeology, Costume and Textiles, and Notman Photographic Archives collections are widely recognized as leaders in their fields.  As well, the breadth and significance of the Textual Archives, Decorative Arts, and Paintings, Prints, and Drawings collections draw researchers with interests in a wide range of aspects of Canada’s past.

For full information on the fellowship, please visit the IPLAI website.

 

David Covo Inducted into the Order of Athabasca University

Prof. David Covo and other members of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC) Centre for Architecture Development Group were inducted into the Order of Athabasca University on June 8 in recognition of their advocacy and promotion of the AU Architecture Program and their contributions to its development. Other inductees were David Craddock, Jon Frank Hobbs, Stuart Howard, Barry Johns, Robert Ian Macdonald, Vivian Manasc, Kiyoshi Matsuzaki, and Carole Scheffer.

 

Lucas Crawford Awarded Governor General's Gold Medal

SSHRC postdoctoral fellow Lucas Crawford has been awarded the Governor General's Gold Medal for his University of Alberta Ph.D. dissertation (Department of English and Film Studies) "Archive, Transgender, Architecture: Woolf, Beckett, diller scofidio + renfro." Lucas' two-year postdoctoral fellowship, supervised by Prof. Annmarie Adams and hosted jointly by the School of Architecture and McGill's Institute for Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies (IGSF), focuses on the transgender life of the High Line in New York City. In fall 2012 he will be teaching SDST 250: Introduction to Sexual Diversity Studies.

 

AZ Awards: Best Student Project

Professional Masters students Caileigh MacKellar and Newsha Ghaeli won the A+ Award for Best Student Project in both the jury and People’s Choice categories in the annual AZ Awards, an international awards competition sponsored by Azure magazine, for their project “Polytropism – Tower Concept,” developed in the M1 studio of Prof. Aaron Sprecher. Sixty finalists were selected from over 600 submissions by a jury composed of architects Imola Bérczi of UNStudio and Brigitte Shim of Shim-Sutcliffe Architects, industrial designer Jeffrey Bernett of Consultants for Design Strategy, interior designer Elaine Cecconi of Cecconi Simone, landscape architect Jennifer Guthrie of Gustafson Guthrie Nichol, and Mike Kielhauer of office systems manufacturer Keilhauer. People’s Choice awards were also designated, following weeks of online voting earlier this year.

For full details and images of the winning projects, please visit the Azure website.

For an article on the Polytropism project in McGill Alumni Live 365 (3 April 2013), please visit this webpage.

 

Three Graduate Students Receive SSHRC Awards

PhD student Philam Nguyen has received a SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship in the amount of $40,000 over the course of two years. The title of her dissertation is “Fuller's Paradox: The Irreconcilable Artist-Scientist,” and her advisory committee members are Michael Jemtrud, Alberto Pérez-Gómez and Torben Berns.

PhD student Olivier Vallerand has received a SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship in the amount of $40,000 over the course of two years. The title of his dissertation is “Staging Everyday Bodies: Queer Critiques in Representations of Domestic Architecture,” and his advisory committee members are Annmarie Adams, Nik Luka and Amelia Jones.

Thomas Evans has received a Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship to pursue his professional Masters degree. The $17,500 award is a 12-month scholarship which began May 1, 2012. The title of his proposed research project is "Sound and Space: Memory Generated by Sensorial and Emotive Narratives," and his advisors are Professors Ricardo Castro and Alberto Pérez-Gómez.

 

Prof. Nik Luka Promoted to Associate Professor

The Board of Governors of McGill University has approved the promotion of Prof. Nik Luka to the rank of Associate Professor with tenure, effective June 1, 2012. Prof. Luka was initially appointed as a tenure-track Assistant Professor (joint) in the Schools of Architecture and Urban Planning on August 1, 2006.

 

Steel Tube of ContemPLAY Pavilion Wins Galvanizing Award

The galvanized steel tube of the ContemPLAY pavilion has won a 2012 Hot-Tip Galvanizing Excellence Award for its galvanizer, Corbec Inc., from the American Galvanizers Association (AGA).  From the citation: “To fabricate the space frame, the choice of galvanized steel tube was made for aesthetic and technical reasons. The galvanization result not only created a soft gray color, it also proved to be the most durable and cost effective process for the project. The color of the wood will turn from natural to a soft gray with time, as the pavilion is exposed to the elements. With age, the galvanized steel and wood will form a common visual structure that espouses the architectural intentions behind the ContemPLAY design.”

To read the citation in full, please visit the AGA webpage.

The pavilion was conceived and produced by instructors Maria Mingallon and Jason Crow, and professional Masters students Hamza Alhbian, Simon Bastien, Justin Boulanger, Evguenia Chevtchenko, Elisa Costa, Nicolas Demers-Stoddart, Andrew Hruby, Olga Karpova, Shelley Ludman, Diandra Maselli, Courtney Posel, Dina Safonova, Dieter Toews, and Sophie Wilkin.

For information on the ContemPLAY pavilion, please visit its website.

For a recent article on the pavilion in the McGill Reporter, please visit here.

 

Aaron Sprecher Receives SSHRC Partnership Development Grant

Congratulations to Professors Aaron Sprecher (School of Architecture, PI), Jorge Angeles (CIM, McGill University, co-applicant), Clement Gosselin (Laboratoire de Robotique, Laval University, co-applicant), Damiano Pasini (Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, collaborator) and Pieter Sijpkes (School of Architecture, collaborator), who have have been awarded a SSHRC Partnership Development Grant ($190,860) for their proposal entitled “Performalism: Form and Performance in Computational Architecture and Fabrication.” The project showcases the integration of multiple sources of knowledge and partnerships among experts in Architecture and Engineering. The research partnership stands at the intersection of design conception, digital manufacturing and engineering investigation by proposing innovative technologies aimed at creating an automated, robot-driven fabrication system capable of producing large-scale architectural prototypes.

Please see the accompanying press release on the SSHRC website.


Smith Promenade (Griffintown) Urban Design Competition

The winning project in the urban design competition for the Smith Promenade, Griffintown, was unveiled on April 26, 2012. Among the four concepts developed by the finalist firms, the jury chose "Granny Smith," the project proposed by NIP Paysage. Two Adjunct Professors in the School were part of the winning team led by NIP Paysage: Sinisha Brdar contributed to architecture and urban design, and Conor Sampson (B.Arch. 1996) to lighting. The jury also awarded a special mention to The Commons Inc. for the originality of its concept, its innovative and poetic approach, and its sensitivity towards the character of the site. Adjunct Professor Talia Dorsey is Founding Principal of The Commons Inc.

The objective of the national urban design competition was to define a new public realm for the rapidly changing Griffintown district of Montreal (in the vicinity of Peel and Wellington). The jury tasked with choosing the finalist proposals included a representative of Griffintown residents as well as professionals in architecture and design: Georges Adamczyk, jury Chair, full professor, School of Architecture, Université de Montréal; Georges Baird, architect, urban designer, professor at John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design, University of Toronto; Eric Bunge, architect, n-architecture, New York; Dominique Côté, landscape architect, representing Sud-Ouest Borough; Wade Eide, architect, AADU, representing the Direction du développement économique et urbain, Ville de Montréal; Bernard Girard, citizen, representing Griffintown residents; Peter Soland, architect, landscape architect, urban designer, Urban Soland.

“I’d like to congratulate the winning team of this urban design competition and underscore the outstanding quality of their project,” said Richard Deschamps, Ville de Montréal Executive Committee Vice-Chair responsible for Economic Development and Large Projects. “Thanks to their rich concept and innovative ideas, Promenade Smith will become one of the mainstays of Griffintown’s urban renewal, providing Montrealers with an inspiring, inviting public space that will be a beacon in the years to come, throughout the district and all over Montréal.”

For her part, Helen Fotopulos, the Executive Committee Member responsible for Culture, Heritage, Design and the Status of Women, said: “Montréal harnesses the talent of design professionals to envision projects that not only enhance quality of life for its citizens, but also ensure the sustainability of its neighbourhoods. I salute the winning firm for the exceptional quality of the project they presented. Their plan for the redevelopment meshes perfectly with our vision of sustainable development taking centre stage here in Montréal, UNESCO City of Design.”

And Véronique Fournier, City Councillor for the Saint-Henri–Petite-Bourgogne–Pointe Saint-Charles district and Chair of the Sud-Ouest borough’s Urban Planning Advisory Committee, added: “The winners have come up with a stimulating, creative solution, and we congratulate them for it. Their landscaping-focused approach wonderfully embodies the key principles of sustainability while demonstrating respect for the historical character of the site. Citizens will be able to enjoy a true gathering place, to be developed with a strong emphasis on greening. This living space will go a long way toward enhancing the structure of an area of Griffintown that sorely needs it.”

For full information, including project details and the competition program, please see the Montreal Ville UNESCO de Design webpage.


Lola Sheppard Wins Architecture Canada | RAIC 2012 Young Architect Award

[From the Architecture Canada | RAIC press release of April 18, 2012:]

Architecture Canada is pleased to announce that it has selected Lola Sheppard, OAQ, MRAIC as the recipient of its 2012 Young Architect Award.

Ms. Sheppard received her Bachelor of Architecture from McGill University and her Master of Architecture degree from the Harvard University, Graduate School of Design. She practiced in Europe for six years, most notably at Jean Nouvel in Paris, and in 2003 became the founding partner of Lateral Office, a Toronto design firm that operates at the intersection of architecture, urbanism, and landscape, and is deeply committed to design of the public realm.

Her interest lies with the relationship between architecture and nature, and architecture’s capacity to sustain local ecosystems and cultures in extreme environments such as the Canadian north. A champion of innovation, she is one of the founding directors of InfraNet Lab, a design research laboratory dedicated to examining the role infrastructures and networks play in our built environment. She inspires a new generation of architects in her role as Associate Professor at University of Waterloo’s the School of Architecture and as a visiting critic at schools across Canada and the U.S.

In choosing Lola Sheppard, the Jury said she is “a talented architect, design leader, and influential educator whose work is contributing to larger societal concerns, going well beyond the bounds of traditional architectural practice.” Her work “is refreshingly curious and exploratory, and her firm’s work on cold climate design and food networks is important and ground-breaking. Ms. Sheppard creates a sense of great expectations of her future work.”

Ms. Sheppard will receive her award during the Presidents' Dinner & Awards Gala, Friday, June 15 at 6:30 p.m. during the 2012 Architecture Canada | RAIC – NLAA Festival of Architecture taking place June 13-16, 2012 at the Delta St. John’s Hotel and Conference Centre.

Details and downloadable images are available at: Young Architect Award.

Architecture Canada’s Young Architect Award recognizes the achievements of a young architect in excellence in design, leadership and/or service to the profession. It is intended that this award will inspire other young architects to become licensed and to strive for excellence in their work.

Architecture Canada | RAIC is a voluntary national association established in 1907 as the voice for architecture and its practice in Canada. Representing more than 4,600 members, the RAIC is the leading voice of architecture in Canada whose mission is: to affirm that architecture matters; to celebrate the richness and diversity of architecture in Canada; and to support architects in achieving excellence.


Lyceum Traveling Fellowship in Architecture

For the second year in a row, a McGill student has received the top award in the Lyceum Traveling Fellowship in Architecture competition. Third-year undergraduate Justin Chapman was awarded first prize (a $12,000 travel grant), while Krystal Lung, Cailen Pybus and Saul Strauss were awarded three of six merit awards. The McGill submissions were projects developed in the U3 studio sections of Profs. Howard Davies, Martin Bressani, Ricardo Castro, Sinisha Brdar and Tom Balaban.

The Lyceum Fellowship was established in 1985 to advance the development of the next generation of talent by creating a vehicle for stimulating perceptive reasoning and inspiring creative thought in architecture. Through a unique structure of design competition and prize winning travel grants it seeks to establish a dialogue through design among selected schools of architecture. The Lyceum Competition welcomes submissions from students attending one of the 15 participating schools. This year's competition theme was "The Wells-Lamson Quarry." The charge was to design a building complex for an institution devoted primarily to visual, literary, landscape and performing artists, engaging the site in a significant way commensurate with the size, scale and emotional impact of the quarry.

For additional information on the 2012 competition, please visit the Lyceum website.

 

Migrating Landscapes - Venice Biennale

Three McGill graduates have been chosen as national winners to participate with Migrating Landscapes in the 2012 Venice Biennale in Architecture: John Leroux (B.Arch. 1994), a member of Team 189 from the Maritimes; Kfir Gluzberg (M.Arch. 2011), a member of Team 206 from Ontario; and Amirali Javidan (M.Arch. 2001), Team 142 from B.C.

[From the Migrating Landscapes website:] Migrating Landscapes was selected by a national juried competition as Canada’s official entry at the 2012 Venice Biennale in Architecture. It will be presented by Winnipeg-based 5468796 Architecture and Jae-Sung Chon, who joined together for this project to form a new entity: the Migrating Landscapes Organizer (MLO). [...] Migrating Landscapes will act as a forum for Canadian architects and designers to investigate, provoke, document and expose the unique manifestations of cultural memory that overlay Canada today and how it might emerge in the future. MLO will design a 'new landscape’ – an abstract exhibition infrastructure – and will invite, through a national competition, young Canadian architects and designers to design ‘dwellings’ based on their cultural memories. The invitation is an enactment of ‘settling-unsettling’, and the dwellings will discuss various forms of migrated memories ‘settled-unsettled’ into the ‘new landscape’. The dwellings and the landscape, together, will form the exhibition at Venice 2012. During the three-month stay in Venice, Migrating Landscapes will offer visitors a view into how migrated memories - their own and others - are registered as part of Canada’s topography, a unique view into Canada’s past, present and future. After Venice, parts of Migrating Landscapes will be disassembled and sent out into the world, embarking on future migrations. This ongoing dissemination will be documented and tracked through the MLO website and a follow-up publication.

The Venice Biennale in Architecture is the single-most important and prestigious international event in contemporary architecture, equivalent to the ‘Olympics’ of Architecture. As the largest tourist event in Italy, the Biennale is also a ‘must-see’ attraction for all visitors to Venice. The Venice Biennale is held in the beautiful Giardini Pubblici (Public Gardens) and the Arsenale (former shipyards), just a short walk from St. Mark’s Square and the heart of the city on the main waterfront of Venice. Canada is one of only 30 countries to have its own permanent national pavilion in the Giardini. Our official 2012 entry, Migrating Landscapes, will be installed in the Canada Pavilion, located at a key position in the Giardini, with panoramic views of the historic city and lagoon. This provides us with a unique opportunity to showcase Canadian excellence in architecture on the world stage. More than 170,000 international visitors will attend the 2012 Venice Biennale to be inspired by cutting-edge architecture, to share ideas and to network with peers in one of the most beautiful cities in the world. Millions more will be exposed to the Venice Biennale through the Biennale’s high-powered international media campaign, a dedicated website, extensive postering throughout Italy, merchandising and an exhibition catalogue. Canadian participants in the Venice Biennale consistently enjoy an exponential increase in profile and business as a result of the worldwide exposure the exhibition provides. The 2012 Venice Biennale will be open from August 29 to November 25, 2012.

For full information on Migrating Landscapes, please visit the website.

 

Andrew King Receives Two P/A Awards

Gerald Sheff Visiting Professor Andrew King will receive two of the 59th Annual Progressive Architecture Awards (2012) which recognize ten projects that offer thoughtful interventions into the landscape, urban or otherwise. (The ten awards are comprised of a single First Award, three Awards, and six Citations.) King’s two Awards are for the Laurier Brantford YMCA Athletic Complex in Brantford, Ontario, and the Hawk House on Cape Sable Island, Nova Scotia. King was the design principal for Cannon Design on the Brantford project, with recent graduate Jeffrey Ma (M.Arch. 2010) on the design team. For the Hawk House project, King was the designer, with recent graduate Nicolay Boyadjiev (M.Arch. 2011) as project partner.

One of the six Citations was awarded to Rack House D (Saucier + Perrotte Architectes) in Toronto, with Vedanta Balbahadur (M.Arch. 2006) and Lia Ruccolo (M.Arch. 2008) on the project team.

From Architect (the magazine of the American Institute of Architects): “The most important, and telling, stipulation in the entry form for the Progressive Architecture Awards is that ‘all projects must be real.’ In other words, every submission must have a client who has land, a budget, and intent to build. These days, bona fide clients may seem hard to come by, but we haven’t softened the rules about rewarding real projects, and the quality of submissions hasn’t suffered one bit. One thing about the P/A Awards that always changes is the working definition of ‘progressive.’ It is up to the jury—which this year comprised Ann Beha, FAIA, Brad Lynch, Mary-Ann Ray, Joseph Rosa, and Cathy Simon, FAIA—to determine what the term means for architecture at a given moment in time. Lynch noted his interest in projects ‘that are creating progress in areas that we haven’t seen before.’ Rosa was attracted to ‘acts of invention, not perfection.’ And for Simon, the P/A Awards have a ‘voice about what design means right now.’ In the end, the jury awarded 10 projects that resolve incredibly diverse programs through incredibly inventive solutions. Be it a house on piers in the middle of a bird sanctuary, or a six-level YMCA that masquerades as a two-story building, this year’s winners tread lightly on the landscape and exemplify what architects do best: They find innovative, and even progressive, approaches to solving real-world problems. And for that, they are to be celebrated.”

For full information on the P/A Awards, please visit the Architect webpage.

For an editorial on the Hawk House, please visit the World Architecture News webpage.

 

Caitlin Turski Awarded Honorable Mention in AIDS Memorial Park Competition

The submission “Memorial Grove” by nt21: Andrew Ruff and post-professional M.Arch.(CMT) student Caitlin Turski has been awarded an Honorable Mention in the AIDS Memorial Park competition in New York City. The competition, in conjunction with Architizer and Architectural Record, was chaired by Michael Arad (designer of the National September 11 Memorial) to generate ideas for the memorial park design. Designers from around the world were invited to submit designs that would create a new neighborhood park and meaningful memorial. The competition jurors selected the winning design, three runners-up, and 11 honorable mentions from 475 entries from 26 U.S. states and 32 countries.

Founded in 2011 by urban planners Christopher Tepper and Paul Kelterborn, AIDS Memorial Park is a coalition of individuals and organizations dedicated to the recognition and preservation of the ongoing history of the AIDS crisis. The organization’s goal is to produce a design for a memorial park to honor New York City’s 100,000+ men, women and children who have died from AIDS, to commemorate and celebrate the efforts of the caregivers and activists who responded to fight the disease, and to recognize the ongoing crisis.

For full information, please see the AIDS Memorial Park website. To view nt21’s submission, please click here.


 

Jason Tsironis Wins Prix de Rome in Architecture for Emerging Practitioners

The 2012 winner of the Canada Council for the Arts’ Prix de Rome in Architecture for Emerging Practitioners, McGill University School of Architecture graduate Jason Tsironis (M. Arch. 2011), will use the prize to explore the potential of modern ruins and collective identity.

Through his project, Monuments and the Fabrication of New Identities – Architectural Transformations and Erasures in Post-Soviet Cities, Mr. Tsironis will study the relationship of old and new in historically sensitive reconstruction and its impact on a nation’s perception of its collective past and present. His research will take him to 11 cities in seven countries of the former Soviet Union, including Moscow (Russia), Kiev (Ukraine), Vilnius (Lithuania), Tbilisi (Georgia) and Almaty (Kazakhstan).

Such research has major implications for the practice of architecture in Canada. Although not as dramatic or traumatic as the case studies in the ex-Soviet Union, Canadian institutions are also important sites for re-engagement. In particular, the precarious situation of historical churches in Quebec is of great interest to Mr. Tsironis. Their potential to serve as a focal point for social interaction is significantly jeopardized by continuous demolition and privatization. Mr. Tsironis’s proposal to research and visit Soviet ruins will give him a sharper understanding of the relationship of memory and identity in the formation of nationhood, equipping him to tackle such issues in multiple contexts.

Mr. Tsironis was selected by an assessment committee of architects: Gordon Atkins (Calgary), Philip Evans (Toronto), Veronica Gillies (Vancouver), Alexander Redford (Price, Quebec) and Taryn Sheppard (St. John’s).

The committee members said, “Jason understands what extraordinary gestures people made when they invested their resources and ambitions in making buildings that would last for many generations after their own passing. It’s heartening to see a young designer try to understand and harness the power embedded in these structures, by way of intelligent repurposing and well-tempered design interventions.”

The $34,000 Prix de Rome in Architecture for Emerging Practitioners is awarded to a recent graduate of one of Canada’s ten accredited schools of architecture who demonstrates outstanding potential. The prize winner is given the opportunity to visit significant architectural sites abroad and to intern at an architecture firm of international stature.

Mr. Tsironis will intern with the firm David Chipperfield Architects in Berlin, Germany. Their work with historically sensitive projects has influenced Mr. Tsironis throughout his studies. In 2010, the firm received the European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture for the rebuilding of the Neues Museum, heavily damaged in the bombing of Berlin during the Second World War.

Full information on the Canada Council website.

Travel blog 2013.

 

Radoslav Zuk Awarded Ukraine's 2011 State Prize for Architecture

By presidential decree of November 29, 2011 the State Prize of Ukraine for Architecture for 2011 has been awarded to Radoslav Zuk, Emeritus Professor at the McGill University School of Architecture. As leader of the design team, Radoslav Zuk was awarded the prize for the design of the Church of the Nativity of the Most Holy Theotokos in the city of Lviv. Other members of the team who received the prize were: the director of the firm responsible for contract documentation and administration - Zenon Pidlisny (posthumously), the iconographer – Svjatoslav Vladyka, and the parish priest – Very Rev. Orest Fredyna.

The only other project which has been recognized with the State Prize of Ukraine for Architecture in 2011 is the reconstructed sports complex (soccer stadium) ‘Metalist’ in the city of Kharkiv.

The State Prize of Ukraine for Architecture is an annual award for “…the creation of significant domestic-civic and commercial architectural complexes, buildings and structures; works in the domain of urban design, landscape architecture, regulation of cities and settlements, restoration of historic monuments of architecture and urban design; works of research in the theory and the history of architecture that are of special importance for further development the country’s architecture and urban design and which received broad civic recognition.” Members of the jury for the prize constitute a committee of experts, which submits its recommendations for approval by a decree of the President of Ukraine.

Principal Design Considerations (by Radoslav Zuk)

Due to economic circumstances, the church has been built in great part by the parishioners themselves. Therefore, the construction has been conceived as a simple reinforced concrete skeleton filled in with brick. As the quality of standard brick in the region is not of high quality (as for example also in Austria) the decision was taken to cover the vertical surfaces with stucco - a tradition in many historical urban buildings in the country. The copings, sills and lintels above the window and door openings are in copper. The doors and window frames are in stained wood. The domes are covered with a special gold-tinted metal alloy.

The floor plan is a clearly stated "modern" interpretation of the typical Byzantine cross-in-square + narthex + plus apse(s) plan. This allows a contemporary, geometrically clear, yet culturally relevant, volumetric configuration. Such an approach may point the way to resolving the conflict between the liturgical demands of a traditional plan and a contemporary three-dimensional articulation also in other East European countries. The proportions of the building, which are based on whole number musical ratios, used not only by Alberti and Palladio, but found also in the works of LeCorbusier, Mies and Kahn, represent an attempt to incorporate architectural attributes which transcend time and place.

The church is located in Sychiv, a satellite town on the outskirts of the historical city of Lviv. Its site is a large open space, on the axis of the main approach to the district, thus giving the building the importance of a focal civic monument. The characteristic roof profile establishes a link to the splendid tradition of Ukrainian ecclesiastical architecture, while the emphasis on geometric clarity and whole number proportions may be seen not only as a deliberate universal contemporary statement, but also as a discreet homage to the city’s fine Renaissance monuments.

Emeritus Professor Radoslav Zuk received the diploma and medal of the State Prize for Architecture of Ukraine from Oleksandr Yarema, Vice-President of the National Union of Ukrainian Architects, at a public ceremony on July 7, 2013, in the Church of the Nativity of the Most Holy Theotokos  in Lviv, for the design of that church.

 Radoslav Zuk receives State Prize for Architecture of Ukraine

 

Concours jeune critique MAQ en architecture

Recent graduate Adel Albloushi (M.Arch. 2010) has won a Special Mention for his project "Reinvention of the Politically Vague" in the inaugural Concours jeune critique MAQ en architecture. The competition is open to all candidates under the age of 35 in the fields of communication, arts and design. It was created by the Maison de l'architecture du Québec (MAQ) to encourage professional practice.

The jury was composed of Ian Chodikoff, Roland-Yves Carignan, Suzanne Paquet, David Theodore, and Sophie Gironnay. Their comments on Albloushi's submission: "David Theodore et Ian Chodikoff ont trouvé que les textes anglophones ne méritaient pas de prix spécifique. Mais le jury a voulu souligner d’une mention spéciale le beau travail de réflexion d’Adel Albloushi (diplômé en architecture à l’Université McGill), dans un article d’analyse d’une profondeur scintillante, hélas desservi par un style et une structure qu’on voudrait plus clairs et plus directs."

For full details, please visit the MAQ webpage.

 

CCA Charrette

Two McGill teams shared first prize in the 17th CCA (Canadian Centre for Architecture) Inter-university Charrette (November 10-13, 2011), Liquid City.  Team 78 (Hydro cosm: Lance Moore, Alexandre Hamel, and Maxime Leclerc) and Team 26 (Down with the Linear Functional: Gabrielle Poirier, Gabrielle Marcoux, Philippe Larocque, and Marc-Antoine Chartier-Primeau), both of McGill, won first prize (ex aequo) in a competition in which a total of 68 teams took part.  Team 72 (Aqua Fest: Baharan Khosravi, Reena Mistry, Sarah Wu Martinez, Tracy Sun, and Seema Fariha), also of McGill, were awarded one of four Honorable Mentions.

The contest – organized by the CCA and the École de design of Université du Québec à Montréal, in collaboration with McGill University and Université de Montréal and with the participation of Université Laval, Carleton University, Ryerson University and the University of Toronto – challenged students and interns by inviting them to reflect on issues and problematics in contemporary architecture, on the theme of Liquid City.

The challenge was to posit a new relationship between the water and city living; to think of innovative ways to imagine and celebrate the presence of water in the urban environment and the daily life of Montreal. The Charrette invited participants to propose specific architectural, urban and landscape interventions and public works which would cause us to reconsider the presence of water in the city as civic responsibility, as practical amenity, as recreational diversion, as public infrastructure and eventually as work of art.

The jury, chaired by Jacques Rousseau, architect, Plania (Montréal), was composed of James Brown, architect, Brown & Storey Architects (Toronto), Julien De Smedt, architect, JDS / Julien De Smedt Architect (Copenhagen, Denmark) and Juliette Patterson, landscape architect, Catalyse Urbaine (Montréal).

For full details, please visit the CCA Charrette webpage.

For results and project details, please visit here.

 

Holcim Award Winners for North America

The winners of the 3rd International Holcim Awards competition for sustainable construction projects and visions from North America were announced on October 20, 2011 in Washington, DC.  The top prize of $100,000 (Holcim Awards Gold) went to a socio-architectural project to create regional food-gathering nodes and a logistics network in Canada’s high Arctic.  The Arctic Food Network (AFN) secures mobility between the scattered Inuit communities, allows a better distribution of local foods, and serves as a series of bases for the reinforcement of traditional hunting. The infrastructure project by Lateral Office / InfraNet Lab based in Toronto and Princeton, NJ, also establishes new foundations for a sustainable, more independent economy.  The authors of the project are Mason White, Lola Sheppard (B.Arch. 1995, McGill), Fionn Byrne, and Nikole Bouchard.

The Swiss-based Holcim Foundation for Sustainable Construction conducts the competition in parallel in five regions across the world. More than 6,000 submissions for projects located in 146 countries entered the Holcim Awards which aim to promote sustainable responses to contemporary technological, environmental, socioeconomic and cultural issues from the building and construction industry.  The winning projects demonstrate how greater levels of sustainability can be reached in building and construction through people-focused designs that include simple adaptation, innovative materials, and clever architecture.

Mohsen Mostafavi, Head of jury and Dean of the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, congratulated the project for creating a cohesive strategy that responds to the landscape, climatic and site conditions. “The project includes purposeful interventions which are integrated without any grand gestures or expensive structures – but instead bridges between the traditions of the Inuit and the expectations of the young generation. The project thereby provides an opportunity to create an improved future, in terms of both economic opportunity and a sustainable way of living,” he said.

Full information on Holcim Awards.

Holcim Awards Gold 2011 North America – Regional food-gathering nodes and logistics network, Iqaluit, NU, Canada.

 

11th Annual ACSA/AISC Steel Design Student Competition

Recent B.Sc.(Arch.) graduate (2011) Yekaterina Artemchuk has been awarded first place in the 2010-2011 Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture / American Institute of Steel Construction (ACSA/AISC) Steel Design Student Competition – Open (Category II), Student Design Competition. The award consists of a cash prize of $2500 awarded to the winning student and a $1000 prize awarded to the advisor, Prof. Martin Bressani. The ACSA/AISC competition received 182 design submissions, and the jurors chose first, second and third prizes along with three honorable mentions. The program challenged students, working individually or in teams, to explore a variety of design issues related to the use of steel in design and construction.

Ms. Artemchuk's winning submission is entitled Lacing the Gaze: Public Library and Cultural Centre for NDG, Montreal, Canada. Prize-winning designs will be exhibited at the ACSA 100th Annual Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, March 2012, and at the American Institute of Architects’ National Convention in Washington, DC, May 2012. In addition, the project will be promoted via a competition summary publication, a press release, and on archiv100.org, an online exhibition celebrating architecture.

The Category II jury consisted of Weiling He, Texas A&M University; Jonathan Ochshorn, Jonathan Ochshorn Architects and Cornell University; and John Syversten, OWPP / Cannon Design. The competition program was written by Ryan E. Smith, University of Utah, College of Architecture + Planning; Eric W. Ellis, ACSA; and Nancy Gavlin, AISC.

Full information on the AISC website.


Sustainability Projects Fund: Edible Campus

The project Making the Edible Campus: A Model of Urban Agriculture for Montreal and Beyond - Phase II has been awarded $127,444 by the Sustainability Projects Fund of the McGill Office of Sustainability. The award will expand the research project of Prof. Vikram Bhatt with the intent to make the Edible Campus into a model of urban agriculture.

Full information on the Edible Campus on the Minimum Cost Housing Group website.

Full information on the Sustainability Projects Fund on the Office of Sustainability website.


SSHRC Insight Development Grant

Prof. Aaron Sprecher (Architecture) and Prof. Damiano Pasini (Mechanical Engineering) have been awarded a SSHRC Insight Development Grant for a total amount of $80,000 to be used within two years. The grant was awarded for "The Evo DeVO Project - Evolutionary Design, Variations and Optimization: Toward a Symbiosis among Formal Expressions, Structural Engineering, and Manufacturing Processes in Architectural Design." Prof. Sprecher is the Principal Investigator and Prof. Pasini the Co-Applicant.

The Evo DeVO research project focuses on the potential to optimize design solutions by combining computational methods that are currently researched in the fields of biomimetics, structural engineering and design computing. The main objective of the project is to use computers to create elegant designs ranging in scale from industrial design components to complex construction systems inspired by biological mechanisms such as the growth of plants, cellular patterns of organization and responsive materials in nature.

The project will be developed in the context of the new CFI-funded Laboratory for Integrated Prototyping in Hybrid Environments (LIPHE) at the School of Architecture. Under the direction of Prof. Sprecher, the lab will define advanced design methods that take advantage of the high degree of optimization offered by computational tools and digital fabrication processes.

The Evo DeVO project stems from a unique interdisciplinary collaboration between an architect with a specialty in digital manufacturing (Sprecher) and an engineer who specializes in structural engineering, design optimization and hybrid material design (Pasini), both from McGill University. The Insight Development Grant will allow the professors to initiate this interdisciplinary collaboration with the aim of ultimately attaining a fully-fledged research program.


Raumfinden Exhibition at the House of Architecture in Graz

Atelier Big City is one of 22 architecture firms from around the world that have been invited to put on a display of their method of working at the Raumfinden exhibition at the House of Architecture in Graz. The presentation includes study models and sketches for a variety of completed projects. The exhibition also contains recorded interviews with curator Elke Krasny and members of Atelier Big City (Adjunct Professor Howard Davies and alumni Anne Cormier and Randy Cohen).

Raumfinden presents the profession under a different light: that of the intimate universe of architectural offices. Through interviews, photographic documents and concrete examples - scale models, drawings, blueprints and other objects - the curator offers an intimate look at 22 different architectural practices.

Raumfinden flyer [.pdf]

Exhibition image


Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library Research Fellowship + Margaret Gillett Graduate Research Award

Ph.D. student Frederika Eilers has been awarded a one-month research fellowship to the Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library in Winterthur, Delaware for Fall 2011. She also won a Margaret Gillett Graduate Research Award from McGill University (Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies) to support her travel to document modern doll houses. Frederika's dissertation explores the relationship of children's play and architecture.


Society for the Study of Architecture in Canada Martin Eli Weil Prize

The Martin Eli Weil prize is awarded annually by the SSAC to the student who submits the best essay on the role played by the built environment in Canadian society. The $250 prize and certificate will be awarded to McGill M.Arch. (post-professional) graduate Dorothy Stern at the Society's Annual Conference (this year in Arvida, Quebec, 25 to 28 May 2011), where she will be invited to present her essay, "The View from Winnipeg: Thoughts on the Evolution of Canadian Interior Design Education." The winning essay will also be published by the Society in the Journal.

Information on the SSAC on the SSAC website.


RAIC 2011 Awards of Excellence

Architecture Canada | Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC) announced on April 18, 2011, the recipients of the 2011 Awards of Excellence. The recipient of the Advocate for Architecture award is Gerald Sheff (B.Arch. 1964).

From the Advocate for Architecture award notice: "Over the years, Mr. Sheff has demonstrated a strong personal passion for architecture, and has given expression to that passion through a remarkable series of important architectural commissions, as well as through an exemplary pattern of philanthropic support for architectural culture in Canada."

The jury members commented: "Beyond Mr. Sheff’s generosity in both his time and philanthropy directed to Architecture and the Arts is his regard, as a client, for the commissioning of building projects which have achieved both national and international recognition contributing to the enhanced profile of Canadian Architecture."

The RAIC noted: "The unanimous and swift decision by the jury to confer the Advocate for Architecture 2011 Award of Excellence on Gerald Sheff is a remarkable testimony to the significant contribution he has made to Canada’s architectural domain."

The Awards of Excellence are bestowed every two years to recognize the greatest achievement in the category identified. The winners are chosen by a series of juries corresponding to the various categories offered. This year’s jury members for the Advocate for Architecture award were: William (Bill) Chomik, PP/FRAIC; Eric Haldenby, FRAIC; and Christopher Fillingham, PP/FRAIC.

The Awards of Excellence will be presented during the Presidents' Dinner & Awards Gala on Friday, May 27, 2011, in Vancouver.


Lyceum Traveling Fellowship in Architecture

Four third-year McGill Architecture undergraduate students have received top awards in the 2011 Lyceum Traveling Fellowship in Architecture competition. Meng Li was awarded first prize (a $12,000 travel prize), Boris Morin-Defoy was awarded third prize (a $1,500 grant), and Stephanie Huss and Sara-Jeanne Jacques-Dagenais were awarded two of four merit awards. The McGill submissions were projects developed in the U3 studio sections of Profs. Howard Davies, Aaron Sprecher, Sinisha Brdar and Matt Fisher.

The organizers reported: "As always, we thank our participating schools for the tremendous work of the faculty and students! We recognize and appreciate the many hours of hard work that is represented by each submission. Our 2011 jury was presented with a long day: a record-breaking 250 entries from 11 schools. Each submission was reviewed by each juror, many entries were discussed among the jury, and the finalists’ entries were deliberated thoroughly for close to two hours. This was a very competitive year; all recognized students should be particularly proud."

The Lyceum Fellowship was established in 1985 to advance the development of the next generation of talent by creating a vehicle for stimulating perceptive reasoning and inspiring creative thought in architecture. Through a unique structure of design competition and prize winning travel grants it seeks to establish a dialogue through design among selected schools of architecture. The Lyceum Competition welcomes submissions from students attending one of the 15 participating schools. This year's competition theme was "Earth Curvature: A Local / Global Rest Area." The 2011 jury chair and program author was Wendell Burnette of Wendell Burnette Architects, Phoenix, AZ.

For additional information on the 2011 competition, please visit the Lyceum website.


SSHRC Research Creation Grant in Fine Arts

Prof. and Director Michael Jemtrud and Planetary Society Visiting Professor in Architecture Torben Berns have received a Research Creation Grant in Fine Arts from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) in the amount of $197,600 (over three years). Together with co-applicant Prof. Aaron Sprecher and collaborators Adjunct Professor Maria Mingallon (Arup) and Ramtin Attar (Autodesk), they will research the topic "Modeling the Methodologies of our Time."

Profs. Jemtrud and Berns provide the following summary: "The objective of the proposed research is to investigate the productive and demonstrative characteristics at play in architectural design methodologies. In pursuit of the advancement of knowledge in the field of architectural creation, this project aims to craft three ‘models’ that act as modes of inquiry in order to investigate, through productive means, the qualities, biases, shortcomings and benefits inherent in specific contemporary modes of creation. In this research, models (n.) are regarded as epistemological tools that aim to offer an understanding of the phenomena that they model (v.) (Flusser, 2002). These models are organized under three main headings that encompass methodological clusters that are currently integral to technologically-enabled architectural creation: 1) Parametric & Simulation; 2) Fabrication & Prototyping and 3) Imaging & Virtual Reality.

"Each model, although not comprehensive, is broadly representative of contemporary modes and can be regarded as its own project with its own appropriate process and manifestation thus determined according to the specific terms and criteria of each grouping. Essential to this objective, the research-creation project adopts a theoretical framework that privileges the understanding of phenomena as ‘paradigms.’ According to Giorgio Agamben, a paradigm is defined as a mechanism that organizes a way of understanding the world through a system of relations rather than classifications (Agamben, 2009). The strategy of treating a subject matter as a paradigm implies different intentions and garners alternate consequences rather than treating a subject in a purely historical way. The process of identifying paradigms includes the exploration of a subject matter acknowledging that methodology (i.e. the sum of the methods, tools and techniques employed in the manifestation of a work) is an inextricable element of the research itself and has the capacity to shape and inform the corpus of the inquiry as opposed to utilizing methodology as merely 'a means to an end.'

"The perspective of the proposed research is situated within the concern for the made and is encapsulated in what uniquely constitutes 'architectural knowledge.' This is to say that this research is taken from a point of view that is essentially ‘fabricative’ (i.e. marked by the capacity to create artifacts). The perception common inside and outside the architectural discipline is to misconstrue the primary role of the architect as a builder, when, in fact, the architect’s primary role has been, and will continue to be, in the realm of making artifacts that make building possible; i.e. drawings and models. Today, as architects have exchanged graphite for a computer mouse and paper for LCD screens, technologically-enabled methodologies are the inherently biased conditions from which architecture is made manifest.

"It is an error to cast a generalizing net over these tools, programs, and frameworks. Terms such as Computer Aided Design (CAD), 'digital' or 'virtual' are ubiquitous classifications of contemporary methodologies that lack rigour and include a variety of vastly different epistemologies, processes and outputs. There is a discrepancy between the multitude of contemporary processes and tools that are currently being used in architectural practice and the limited amount of knowledge of the significance and determining characteristics of these processes to the larger community of practitioners that include students, artists, architects and researchers. The contribution that this project makes is in the bridging of this gap with the belief that we can only begin to understand the world around us if we first grasp the methods of our time that are inextricable from the shaping of the world itself.

"The research creation will result in a critical understanding and unpacking of these new computational methodologies through: 1) an historically informed and theoretically specific framework for creation; 2) three 'demonstrations' of these methodologies as architectural events that constitute manifold aspects of the architectural project which by definition contains mutually dependent artifacts of varying ontological statuses; 3) a critical, retrospective unpacking of the demonstrations. The research creation aims to lay bare the complex intertwining of these 'paradigmatic' models of production and imaginative creation."


ContemPLAY Pavilion

The ContemPLAY pavilion is a combined steel and wood structure created by the McGill School of Architecture DRS (Directed Research Studio) M.Arch. students as a capstone project for their final year. It is built in collaboration with FARMM (Facility for Architectural Research and Media Mediation), and Maria Mingallon, the Gerald Sheff Visiting Professor.

The pavilion project is an excellent demonstration of the latest developments in the DRS program, exposing advanced construction techniques, digital processes and theoretical approaches to architecture in the public realm. Furthermore, the project highlights the student potential as well as the capacity for trans-disciplinary team work on a high level project.

ContemPLAY Pavilion

The ContemPLAY pavilion is meant as a multi-generational artefact that gathers the ideas of contemplation and playing in a single clear gesture. As a socially sustainable public infrastructure that plays with the visual field through form and cladding, it questions the current trend in public space furniture and encroaches in the realm of the abstract sculpture or artefact.

ContemPLAY Pavilion

The gesture itself is a three-dimensional mobius strip which is supported by a triangular truss. The truss is a combination of plywood and steel elements. The cladding is a visual pattern generated to create a simultaneous moiré and parallax effect. As the public approaches and engages with the pavilion, the visual field is modified and interrupted by the interference created by motion and the two layers of cladding. The eye continuously covers the never ending surface of the mobius inviting dynamic motion from the user. Within, a bench anchors the project to the ground, allowing for a center seat in a never ending structure. The light filters through the cladding generating an ambiguous relationship between the notions of inside and outside as well as furniture and shelter.

ContemPLAY Pavilion

For full details, please visit the ContemPLAY Pavilion website.

To read the notice at World Architecture News.Com, please visit the following webpage.

To read the eVolo notice, please visit the following webpage.

For information in French, please visit the Kollectif webpage.

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Canadian Architect Awards of Excellence

Atelier Big City has been awarded one of six 2010 Awards of Excellence by Canadian Architect. These awards are given each year to architects and architectural graduates for buildings in the design stage. One of only two national award programs devoted exclusively to architecture, the Awards of Excellence have recognized significant building projects in Canada on an annual basis since 1968. This year's winners have been selected by a jury consisting of Janna Levitt of Levitt Goodman Architects in Toronto, James Cheng of James KM Cheng Architects in Vancouver, and Andrew King of Cannon Design. Awards are given for architectural design excellence. Jurors considered response to the program, site, geographical and social context, and evaluated physical organization, structure, materials and environmental features.

The principals of Atelier Big City are Adjunct Professor Howard Davies (B.Arch. 1983), Anne Cormier (B.Arch. 1982) and Randy Cohen (B.Arch. 1982).

In addition, Jeffrey Ma (M.Arch. 2010), for his project Logic Shift, is one of two students selected as an award winner for a graduating thesis project. For full information on this winning project, please see the following press release.

For information on all the 2010 Awards of Excellence winners, please see the following press release. And for the original announcement, please see the following press release.


Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals (CAHP) Awards

Fournier Gersovitz Moss & Associés Architectes (FGMAA) is proud to announce that it has received two awards for preservation of a heritage building under the most recent Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals (CAHP) awards program. FGMAA received an Award of Merit for the restoration of the F.A.C.E school’s auditorium in Montreal, and an award for restoration of the Southeast Tower, West Block Building, on Parliament Hill in Ottawa.

The members of FGMAA are Adjunct Professor Julia Gersovitz (B.Arch. 1975), Alain Fournier (B.Arch. 1975), Rosanne Moss (B.Arch. 1980), and Georges Drolet (B.Arch. 1984).

For additional information on the two winning projects, please see the full v2com.biz press release.


Notre-Dame-de-Grâce Cultural Centre

The jury chaired by Dan S. Hanganu has selected the team of Atelier Big City, Fichten Soiferman et Associés and L'ŒUF as winner of the architectural design competition for the future Notre-Dame-de-Grâce Cultural Centre.

Numerous McGill alumni are involved in this win: Howard Davies (B.Arch. 1983), Anne Cormier (B.Arch. 1982) and Randy Cohen (B.Arch. 1982) for Atelier Big City; Jacob Fichten (B.Arch. 1967) and Gerald Soiferman (B.Arch. 1963) for Fichten Soiferman et Associés; Bernard Oliver (B.Arch. 1992 and M.Arch. 1997), Danny Pearl (B.Arch. 1986) and Mark Poddubiuk (B.Arch. 1985) for L'ŒUF.

“The public presentation of the finalist projects in this architectural competition allowed citizens to appreciate the visions and ideas of the various teams, and of the winning team in particular,” said Christine St-Pierre, Québec Minister of Culture, Communications and the Status of Women. “I congratulate Atelier Big City, Fichten Soiferman et Associés and L'ŒUF for their inventive spirit. They have produced a concept that will make this a truly valuable cultural centre that will meet the needs of the community.”

For additional information on the competition, please see the full City of Montreal press release.


5th i-Rec Student Competition

Professional M.Arch. graduate Andrea Chynoweth has won second prize in the 5th i-Rec Student Competition (architecture for disaster reduction and reconstruction), held in conjunction with the 5th i-Rec international conference at CEPT University campus (Navrangpura, Ahmedabad, India), July 15 – 20, 2010. Fourteen graduate and undergraduate students from seven universities in Canada, Colombia, New Zealand, Cuba and the UK submitted projects to the competition. Selection of best entries was made on the basis of contextual relevance, principles of participatory design, appropriate technology, cost effectiveness, flexibility, sustainability, and presentation of the project. The prizes were sponsored by The Arcop Group and Spon Press.

The Project "Community Building: A Catalytic Approach" in Colonia, Uruguay was adjudged the second prize for its special consideration of local economy, capacity building and the use of responsive incremental design plan. The prize was $1000 (CAN) and 3 Spon Press books.

For additional information on the competition and winners, please see the following website.


Director of McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies

Prof. Annmarie Adams has accepted the directorship of the McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies. Effective September 1, 2010, Prof. Adams will serve as Director for a three-year term. She will continue to teach at the School on a half-time basis.

The IGSF was formerly the McGill Centre for Research and Teaching on Women, with which Prof. Adams has been affiliated since 1990. The Institute came into being at the end of March 2009, as an academic unit in the Faculty of Arts. It aims to stimulate, support and disseminate research in gender, sexual diversity, and feminist studies through five interdisciplinary research axes. The IGSF is also the administrative site for McGill's Sexual Diversity Studies Program and the Women's Studies Program. The IGSF organizes a number of public events each academic year, including symposia, public lectures, workshops and a seminar series. The outgoing director is Prof. Marguerite Deslauriers of the Department of Philosophy.


Professional Prix de Rome in Architecture

Toronto architecture firm Lateral Office is the winner of the $50,000 Professional Prix de Rome in Architecture for 2010. Administered by the Canada Council for the Arts, this award recognizes excellent achievement in Canadian architectural practice. Lateral Office’s founding partners, Lola Sheppard (B.Arch. 1995) and Mason White, will use the prize funds to travel to the Arctic to pursue their research proposal entitled Emergent North. The travel research continues an ongoing investigation and documentation of cold-climate settlement forms, issues, and vernacular innovations in the Circumpolar region.

The Professional Prix de Rome in Architecture is awarded to a young architect or practitioner of architecture, an architecture firm or an architectural design firm that has completed its first buildings and demonstrated exceptional artistic potential. The prize, established in 1987, allows the winners to travel to other parts of the world to hone their skills, develop their creative practice and strengthen their presence in international architecture culture. The project can involve multiple trips to a number of destinations, spread over a two-year period. Lateral Office was selected by a peer assessment committee appointed by the Canada Council, which included Monica Adair (Saint John, N.B.), George Baird (Toronto), Bruce Haden (Vancouver), Serena Keshavjee (Winnipeg) and Pierre Thibault (Sillery, Que.).

For full details, please see the following webpage on the Canada Council website.


Above the Pavement — The Farm!

WORK Architecture Company is pleased to announce that their new book Above the Pavement — The Farm! has been published by Princeton Architectural Press. WORKac was founded in 2003 by Amale Andraos (B.Arch. 1996) and Dan Wood.

Forty years after French protestors took to the streets with the rallying cry "Sous les pavés, la plage!" (Beneath the pavement, the beach!), a new form of radical expression took shape at MoMA's P.S.1 courtyard in Queens. Above the Pavement — The Farm! reveals the groundbreaking efforts of WORKac and their team of more than 150 collaborators—farmers, politicians, soil scientists, engineers, students, and artists—to create a new type of sustainable urban infrastructure. With contributions by artist and agricultural activist Fritz Haeg, architectural historian Meredith TenHoor, architect Winy Maas, and head chef Michael Anthony of the Gramercy Tavern.

In celebration, there will be a panel discussion at the Horticultural Society on Wednesday, June 23, 2010.


9th Annual SSEF Architectural Student Design Competition 2010

Two students from the School have won the Award of Excellence in the Steel Structures Education Foundation (SSEF) Architectural Student Design Competition. The winning team was composed of U2 students Tara Hagan and Claire Wang, and their submission was entitled "The Sunken Garden, A Pavilion for the Public, Montreal's Underground City." The Award of Excellence comes with a $3,000 prize for the team and a $1,500 prize for the faculty supervisor (Pieter Sijpkes). SSEF will also cover all the expenses of the winning students to attend the annual meetings of the SSEF and the Canadian Institute of Steel Construction (CISC) in Kananaskis, Alberta, in June.

A third U2 student from the School, Keith Thomas, has won the second prize, the Award of Merit, in the same competition. The Award of Merit comes with a $2,000 prize for the student and a $1,000 prize for the faculty supervisor (Pieter Sijpkes).

From the competition call: "Students are invited not only to explore curvature as it may be expressed in form, surfaces, members, and connections; they are also invited to engage in the exploration of curvature as part of a structural dialogue of tension and compression that must be brought into balance in the structural resolution of architectural form. While they may range from utilitarian to exquisite in their execution, all responses must, nonetheless, come to terms with one simple problem: the clear expression of curvature encapsulated within a structural form. To this end, the solution cannot hide this structural requirement; it must, instead, be celebrated and exploited, both architecturally and structurally."

The SSEF Architectural Design Competition was created to give a unique opportunity to students enrolled in professional programs in Architecture in Canada. The competitions provide incentive to explore the detailed design of exposed steel systems.


Fellowship in the RAIC

The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada has published the names of the 31 members advanced in 2010 to Fellowship in the College of Fellows. The School of Architecture is proud to announce that Prof. Ricardo L. Castro is one of those members whose induction ceremony will take place at the convocation during the RAIC/SAA Festival of Architecture in Saskatoon on June 24.

The College of Fellows formally recognizes members and distinguished laypersons who have made outstanding contributions to the profession. Fellowship in the RAIC is an honour conferred on members singled out for their contribution to research, scholarship, public service or professional standing to the good of architecture in Canada, or elsewhere.

For a full list of the 2010 RAIC Fellows, please follow the "2010 Fellows" heading on the March 2010 RAIC Bulletin.

For more information on the RAIC/SAA Festival of Architecture, please see the following website.


Scarlet Key

Architecture student Julia Webster was one of 14 McGill students to receive a Scarlet Key on Tuesday 23 March 2010 in a pinning ceremony presided over by Principal Heather Munroe-Blum. The Scarlet Key Society has promoted student leadership at McGill for over 75 years. The prestigious Scarlet Key award is given out to recognize and celebrate excellence in student leadership and extra-curricular activity.

Julia Webster is a post-professional M.Arch. student, enrolled in the History and Theory of Architecture option. Since 2005, she has been a positive force in campus life. Julia was a member of the first Bachelor of Arts and Science Integrative Council (BASiC), serving as the VP Internal, VP Arts External and finally as President. In that time, she obtained a new central office for the council, solidified the funding structure and ensured succession planning for years to come. Under her presidency, the council produced the first issue of the journal Ampersand and developed a new website. In her fourth year, Julia was elected Vice-President Internal of the Students' Society of McGill University (SSMU). She re-envisioned the role of the VP Internal, formed a productive relationship with the Varsity Council and supported La Commission des Affaires Francophones and the Environment Commissioners. She oversaw construction of a new, bilingual website, confirming a commitment to bilingualism at the Society. She co-wrote the first "Greening Events Guide" and directed a multitude of successful campus-wide events, helping to build a sense of community. Julia was also involved in the creation of the 2009 SSMU Handbook, an acting editor of the Old McGill yearbook and a Photo Editor of the McGill Tribune.

For more information about the Scarlet Key Society, please see the following McGill website.


Major Collaborative Research Initiative

Prof. Annmarie Adams and 24 other researchers in six countries are part of an interdisciplinary team to receive $2.5 million in MCRI (Major Collaborative Research Initiative) research funding over seven years from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Led by sociologist Prof. Pat Armstrong from York University, the group will explore promising practices for understanding and organizing long-term residential healthcare. The methodology of the project is particularly innovative, including thematic clustering, site switching, and rapid ethnographies.

Prof. Adams' specific contribution will be to identify promising architectural trends in current facilities and to evaluate the benefits and pitfalls of both residential and medical design models. U2 student Eve Lachapelle will participate in the project this summer as part of the Faculty's SURE (Summer Undergraduate Research in Engineering) program.

For more information about the funding, please see the York University media release.


Prix de Rome in Architecture for Emerging Practitioners

School of Architecture graduate Elizabeth Paden (M.Arch. 2009) is the winner of the Canada Council for the Arts’ Prix de Rome in Architecture for Emerging Practitioners. She will study the impact that large-scale public buildings can have on territorial boundaries within geopolitical regions.

This $34,000 Prix de Rome is awarded to a recent graduate of one of Canada’s ten accredited schools of architecture who demonstrates outstanding potential. The prize winner is given the opportunity to visit significant architectural sites abroad, and to intern at an architecture firm of international stature.

Over the next year, Ms. Paden will travel to three regions that offer insight into the humanity of architecture, including The Ghetto (suburbs of Paris), The Colony (boundary between Israel and the West Bank) and The Fringe (Euro-Arctic boundaries of northern Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia). She hopes these studies of responsive social design will inform the Canadian architectural process for peripheral Aboriginal communities and enrich cultural exchange between communities. Ms. Paden’s internship will be with 0047 in Oslo, Norway. Together, they will develop a collaborative public exhibition to be showcased in Canada.

Ms. Paden was selected by an assessment committee consisting of architects Susan Herrington (Vancouver), Todd Emel (Saskatoon), Marie-Josée Therrien (Toronto) and Terrence Smith-Lamothe (Halifax). Her submission impressed the committee. They were “drawn to the manner in which she proposes to investigate the challenging theme of boundary through a thoughtful selection of diverse existing architectural interpretations and then relates them back to a specific Canadian condition.”

For the full text, please visit the Canada Council news release webpage.


Max Kalman

Maxwell Myron Kalman (B.Arch. 1931) passed away peacefully on November 27, 2009, at the Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, in his 104th year. Distinguished architect, developer, and community volunteer, Max Kalman was born in Montreal, the fourth child of immigrant parents from Romania. He studied architecture at Columbia and McGill Universities, receiving the Anglin Norcross Medal on graduation from McGill in 1931. He was a leader in commercial and residential architecture. He designed Canada's first shopping centre, Norgate at Ville St-Laurent, in 1949; the Norgate housing complex was the first project invested in by CMHC under the National Housing Act. In the 1950s he turned to development. He created the Town of Lorraine, also supported by CMHC, considered a model for its quality of suburban life. He participated in the Canadian efforts in World War II by manufacturing parts for training aircraft and merchant marine submarine-detection for the Department of Munitions and Supply. He was active in community service as a fundraiser and volunteer, particularly for State of Israel Bonds and the United Jewish Appeal. He was awarded the Louis Marshall Gold Medal for service to the Jewish Theological Seminary, New York, in 1961. Schools that benefitted from his generous donations of money and time include the School of Architecture at Technion University, the Hebrew University, the Weizmann Institute, and Barilon University, all in Israel; and McGill University in Montreal.

(From the obituary in The Gazette).


CCA Charrette

A McGill team of five M1 Architecture students won third prize this year in the 15th edition of the CCA’s Interuniversity Charrette (November 5 to 8, 2009). M.Arch. (professional) students Gabrielle Poirier, Ksenia Kagner, Michael Faciejew, Simon Bastien and Sebastian Bartnicki competed against over 30 other teams from McGill, U de M, Laval, UQAM, Carleton and Ryerson. Their project From Boundaries to Borders impressed the jury with its "sensitive and intelligent focus on the interstitial spaces, as well as the iteration between public and private uses." The jury also found that a "key strength of this project lies in its focus on ecological performance to enrich biodiversity."

The CCA Interuniversity Charrette is a forum for future creators and thinkers of urbanity, benefitting from all the disciplines linked to the life of cities: architecture, urban design and planning, landscape architecture, interior design, industrial design, and graphic design. The theme of this year's charrette was "Nourishing the city through landscape." Participants were challenged to tackle the broad and admittedly immense task of reconciling urban culture and nature. The specific mandate involved exploring ways in which to build on the strengths of Parc-Extension to make it a more viable, convivial, and sustainable urban context.

For full details on the charrette, please visit the CCA charrette webpage for 2009.


Applied Arts Awards

Tamzyn Berman (Atelier Pastille Rose) has won two Applied Arts (Canada's Visual Communications Magazine) awards in the Design category. The first award (in the sub-category Newsletter, Journal or House Publication - Single) was for Volume #01, the inaugural issue of the School newsletter. The second award (in the sub-category Poster - Series) was for the 2008/2009 lecture series posters. (The lecture series posters also won a Grafika award earlier this year.)



Outdoor Sound Art Installation for June Callwood Park

Toronto Cultural Services’ Public Art Office has announced the winning public art concept for June Callwood Park. OKTA, by Steve Bates and Douglas Moffat, will be the City of Toronto’s first permanent sound-based public artwork and the first permanent public commission by the Montreal-based artists. Steve Bates is a media artist, musician, and audio technician whose current work revolves around improvised and composed music, radio, and installation projects. Trained as a landscape architect, Douglas Moffat’s work explores the relationship between sound and the built landscape. Using field recordings, electro-acoustics, and landscape architecture, his projects are spaces built for listening. Both artists live in Montreal, where Moffat is currently an M.Arch. student in the post-professional program.

OKTA was selected through an open competition process that began in February 2009. An independent panel expert in contemporary sound art, local community issues and June Callwood’s life selected both the short list of artists and winning concept. June Callwood Park will be located between Fleet Street and Fort York Boulevard in the emerging Fort York Neighbourhood of Toronto. The park and artwork are expected to be complete by spring 2011.

For further information on the winning public art concept for June Callwood Park, please visit the City of Toronto news website.



SITQ Award for Excellence

The SITQ Award for Excellence, given to an individual (or group) who has made an exceptional contribution to heritage preservation, has been awarded this year to Julia Gersovitz (B.Arch. 1975) and Fournier Gersovitz Moss et Associés Architectes. The award highlights the work of the firm's group of heritage specialists that includes Julia Gersovitz (an Adjunct Professor at the School), Rosanne Moss (B.Arch. 1980), Georges Drolet (B.Arch. 1984), Dima Cook (B.Arch. 1995), John Diodati (B.Arch. 1990) and their teams. The Award for Excellence is given out as part of the 19th Montreal Architectural Heritage Campaign (City of Montreal and Fondation Héritage Montréal).

The citation includes the following: "For close to 35 years, Julia Gersovitz has contributed to the preservation and rehabilitation of Montreal's architectural heritage, whether through her practice as an architect, her teaching at McGill University and Université de Montréal, her active participation in a number of public commissions or her involvement with advocacy groups for heritage preservation. This dedicated woman has been very instrumental in making heritage conservation a new specialization, a contribution that the Montreal Architectural Heritage Campaign wishes to underscore."

For further information on the 2009 SITQ Award for Excellence, please visit the Montreal Architectural Heritage Campaign website.



UN Habitat Scroll of Honour

The late Peter Oberlander (B.Arch. 1945) has been selected to receive the 2009 UN Habitat Scroll of Honour posthumously. In her citation, Jane Nyakairu, World Habitat Day Coordinator at UN Habitat, writes, "It was our unanimous opinion that Mr. Oberlander, a founding father of UN Habitat, should receive the award for his lifetime of promoting the urban agenda around the world."

The Scroll of Honour, considered the most significant prize in the field of human settlements, will be presented during the global observances to be held in Washington DC on October 5, 2009. The United Nations has designated the first Monday of October every year as World Habitat Day. The idea is to reflect on the state of our towns and cities and the basic right of all to adequate shelter. It is also intended to remind the world of its collective responsibility for the future of the human habitat.

For further information on the 2009 UN Habitat Scroll of Honour, please visit the webpage.


Newfoundland Historic Trust Southcott Award

Prof. Robert Mellin received his eighth Southcott Award from the Newfoundland Historic Trust in June 2009, this time for the restoration of the old Post Office in Tilting, Newfoundland. Professor Mellin volunteered to assist in the restoration of the building, and he has been involved with heritage conservation in the community of Tilting since 1987. The Old Post Office on Post Office Lane was constructed in the early 1900’s and also housed the telegraph service. The building has a special roof shape that identifies its public function as was typical for post offices in other Newfoundland outports. There was a U.S. Army base in Sandy Cove just outside Tilting during World War II, and during the war the first telephone in the community was mounted just outside the office door for emergency use by the military.

In the fall of 2009, History Television will present “Saving Places” with segments documenting the restoration of the old Post Office in Tilting, Newfoundland. History Television funded the cost of materials and labour for the restoration. A film crew visited Tilting on several occasions to document the progress of the work, and most of the labour was provided by local residents with occasional participation by the film crew. Restoration work involved the careful removal and documentation of many layers of interior materials and fittings for different types of occupation after the Old Post Office was sold and a new post office was constructed on the main road in the 1960’s (the Old Post Office was used as Emmeline’s Groceteria for a few years). On the exterior, the existing windows were repaired and new wooden clapboards were installed using a rainscreen detail, latex, paint, and stainless steel nails to reduce maintenance costs. Wooden roof shingles were installed with traditional coursing over a breather mesh. The old masonry chimney with soft brick and lime mortar was repaired by one of History Television’s carpenters who also happened to be an expert mason from England.

For further information on the Southcott Awards, please visit the Newfoundland Historic Trust website.


Re-Forming Health Colloquium, Melbourne

On June 11, 2009, the Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning of the University of Melbourne is hosting a colloquium to coincide with the visit of Prof. Annmarie Adams who will be the keynote speaker for this event, "Re-Forming Health: A Colloquium on the Architecture, Politics + Landscapes of Healthcare, 1880 - 1960."

Drawing on material from many parts of the world, speakers will examine the historical development of healthcare and discourses of the healthy body from the late nineteenth century through to the post- World War II period. Participants will address the growing importance of hospital-based medicine and specialist hospital design; the politics and culture of “national regeneration”; the evolution of asylums; responses to tuberculosis; and changing ideas about the medicinal qualities of hospital and asylum landscapes.

For additional information on the colloquium, please visit the colloquium website.


Trudeau Foundation Scholarship

Fifteen young PhD students received $2.7 million worth of scholarships from the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation on May 20, 2009. Amongst the recipients is David Theodore (B.A. 1991, B.Sc.Arch. 1994, B.Arch. 1996, M.Arch. 2001), until recently a research associate and third-year studio design teacher at the School, and currently a Ph.D. student at Harvard undertaking a double doctorate in Architecture and Urban Planning. He is studying the architecture of health-care buildings as a form of medical technology influencing health care.

The Trudeau Scholarships, worth up to $180,000 each, will help the students advance research on crucial topics such as affordable housing, gambling addiction, water supply management, assistance to refugees, and health worker migration. The Scholars are all actively engaged in their fields and expected to become leading national and international authorities on issues that affect local and global societies.

“Trudeau Scholarships not only accelerate the careers of those who receive them, but also enable recipients to make a significant contribution to Canada and to Canadians. We reward excellence and provide young doctorate students with the best conditions to ground their work in the real world,” said Foundation President P.G. Forest. The annual $60,000 bursaries, for up to four years, subsidize tuition fees and living expenses and allow the Scholars to travel for research and scholarly networking and knowledge dissemination. The Trudeau Scholarships are the most generous awards of their kind in Canada.

For additional information on the foundation and its awards, please visit the Trudeau Foundation scholarships website.


Tilting Exhibition Opens at Dalhousie

Prof. Robert Mellin's exhibition of material culture on Fogo Island and Tilting opens Monday 4 May 2009 at the Dalhousie School of Architecture and runs until Friday 15 May. The exhibition is representative of the large body of field recording and interviews conducted by Prof. Mellin in his book Tilting: House Launching, Potato Trenching, Slide Hauling, and Other Tales from a Newfoundland Fishing Village (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2003). The show is also accompanied by videos describing aspects of the community in detail. The exhibition will be open daily from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the Dalhousie School of Architecture, 5410 Spring Garden Road. Prof. Mellin will lecture on the work in Tilting on Thursday 14 May at 7:00 p.m. at the School of Architecture in HA-19. A reception and book signing will be held following the lecture.


Billes Architecture Student Design Competition

Six students from the School of Architecture have won three of the top five awards for creating new home designs in devastated areas of New Orleans. Top architecture schools in North America were invited to submit original concepts to be judged on originality, innovation and sustainability, among other criteria, in the Billes Architecture Student Design Competition. McGill teams formed by U3 students Justin Boulanger and Ann Rodgers, Jessica Dan and Hamza Alhbian, and David Dworkind and Andrew Hruby were among the winners selected from the many entrants. Seven of the ten finalists in the competition were McGill teams, and student representatives from all seven finalist teams travelled to New Orleans for the awards ceremony on April 11, 2009.

The jury's criteria included aesthetics, feasibility, use of green building techniques and materials, and cost. The aim was to generate a series of cutting-edge designs for single-family homes that could be built on empty lots in many of the still-devastated areas of New Orleans. Students were asked to design homes with one of four neighborhoods in mind: Uptown, Downtown, Gentilly/Lakeview, and New Orleans East. Each neighborhood came with its own set of criteria, such as setbacks, height restrictions, and lot sizes.

Azure article of April 14, 2009.

For earlier coverage, please see the McGill Reporter story of April 1, 2009.




Lyceum Traveling Fellowship in Architecture

A third-year undergraduate McGill Architecture student has received a top award in the 2009 Lyceum Traveling Fellowship in Architecture competition. Traian Dima was awarded second prize for his winning project and will receive a $7,500 travel fellowship. The McGill submissions to the Lyceum competition were projects developed in the U3 studio sections of Profs. Tom Balaban, Howard Davies, and Robert Claiborne.

The Lyceum Fellowship was established in 1985 to advance the development of the next generation of talent by creating a vehicle for stimulating perceptive reasoning and inspiring creative thought in architecture. Through a unique structure of design competition and prize winning travel grants it seeks to establish a dialogue through design among selected schools of architecture. The Lyceum Competition welcomes submissions from only 14 participating schools (McGill is the only Canadian school invited). This year's competition theme was "Making as a Way of Thinking: A Blacksmithing Studio at Penland, North Carolina." The 2009 jury chair and program author was Frank Harmon (FAIA), Raleigh, North Carolina.

For additional information on the 2009 competition, please visit the Lyceum website.


ParaSolar: Phototropic Environments

The exhibition Tel Aviv: From Garden City to Ecosystem will take place April 1 through 7, 2009, in Tel Aviv, Israel. The exhibition features a series of projects by students from 20 national and international universities including McGill University. These projects envision the future of Tel Aviv and its environment. The projects are featured in the large-scale installation ParaSolar by Open Source Architecture (Prof. Aaron Sprecher, founding partner). ParaSolar is a phototropic environment constituted of 100 inflatable spaces and installed on a 1000-square-metre stage. Mr. Ron Holdai, Mayor of Tel Aviv-Yafo, will honour the event and open the exhibition on April 1 at the Center for the Performing Arts in Tel Aviv.

Open Source Architecture website.


Shovel Ready + 49 Cities

WORK Architecture Company is pleased to announce two upcoming exhibitions, a lecture, and the launch of their new book 49 Cities. WORKac is Amale Andraos (B.Arch. 1996) and Dan Wood. The reception and lecture for Shovel Ready will be on Friday, March 27, 2009, and the exhibition will run from March 27 through April 18 at Parsons The New School for Design. The opening and book launch of 49 Cities will be on Tuesday, April 14, and the exhibition will run from April 14 through May 30 at Storefront for Art and Architecture.

WORKac website.


My Two Polish Grandfathers

Witold Rybczynski (B.Arch. 1966, M.Arch. 1972, D.Sc. 2002) was at the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) on March 26, 2009, to read from, discuss, and sign his latest book, My Two Polish Grandfathers: And Other Essays on the Imaginative Life (Scribner, 2009). The event was sponsored by the Canadian Foundation for Polish Studies, the McGill School of Architecture, and the Polish Students Society of McGill.


n-natures

The exhibition "n-natures: Variations on the Riemann Zeta Function" will take place March 16 through April 7, 2009, in Providence, Rhode Island, at the BEB Gallery of the Rhode Island School of Design. The exhibition is a collaborative project by Open Source Architecture (Prof. Aaron Sprecher, founding partner) and JBohn Associates (with Dr. Edward C. Mosteig, Dept. of Mathematics, Loyola Marymount University).

Open Source Architecture website.

JBohn Associates website.


Grafika Graphic Design Award

Tamzyn Berman (Atelier Pastille Rose) has won a Grafika award in the category Print Media / Cultural Poster / Series for the graphic design of the School of Architecture lecture series posters for 2008-2009. The award was part of the 12th edition of the competition run by Grafika magazine.

Grafika website coverage of award to Atelier Pastille Rose.

Atelier Pastille Rose website.


Canadian Architect 2008 Awards of Excellence

Marie-Gil Blanchette (M.Arch. 2008) has won one of four Canadian Architect 2008 Student Awards of Excellence. Her project Watercycle seeks to rethink water management specifically within the context of the city of Montreal. It attempts to create a link between the functional water treatment in the city - often invisible to the public eye - and the poetic celebration of water. This prototypical project treats snow, recycles residual grey water, and creates a new type of urban park. The spaces guide the visitor along a journey through which one discovers the process of filtration.

Jury members Bing Thom, Siamak Hariri, and Christine Macy were effusive in their praise for Blanchette's project. Hariri wrote, "The beauty of this project is that the architect solves a very real problem." Macy characterized it as "sophisticated, forward-thinking and creative." And Thom commented, "This project speaks of how to adopt another perspective on waste, and how to make something beautiful out of it."

Canadian Architect website with coverage of the awards (December 2008).


CCA Charrette

A McGill team of five U2 Architecture students won first prize this year in the category Agitation in the 14th edition of the CCA’s Interuniversity Charrette (October 30 to November 3, 2008). Second-year undergraduate students Emma Greer, Pierre-Luc Perron, Sophie Lauriault, Katherine Messina, and Sarah Tu competed against 31 other teams from McGill, U de M, Laval, UQAM, Carleton and Ryerson. Their project Manifesto was cited by the jury for being "powerful, simple, supple and direct." The jury also "appreciated the fact that the project seeks to involve the community in its own development."

The CCA Charrette is now an annual forum for young creators in the fields of design and planning, bringing together the full range of design-related disciplines: architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, industrial design, interior design, and graphic design. In addition to university students, the charrette welcomes young designers (recent graduates) participating in internships with professional associations in Quebec. The theme of this year's charrette was the ongoing housing crisis in Nunavik. Participants were invited to propose design solutions at a variety of scales encompassing urbanism, architecture and industrial design.

For full details on the charrette, please visit the CCA charrette webpage for 2008.


National History Society's Pierre Berton Award

Professor Annmarie Adams and David Theodore (now at Harvard University) are among the winners of the National History Society's Pierre Berton Award for 2008, the highest honour for the dissemination of history in Canada. The prize was awarded November 13 in Toronto to the entire team of researchers who contributed to the innovative teaching website, Great Unsolved Mysteries in Canadian History (www.canadianmysteries.ca). The McGill researchers developed the case study entitled The Redpath Mansion Mystery, exploring a mysterious double death in the famous family’s Square Mile Mansion. The award includes a $5,000 prize, which will be used to fund the project in its next phase.

For more information on the project and the award, please visit the National History Society's website.


AIA/AAH Student Design Charrette

A team from the School was selected to participate in this year’s annual Student Design Charrette held November 7-11, hosted by the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Academy of Architecture for Health (AAH) in Washington DC. Led by Adjunct Professor Robert Claiborne, M1 students Ali Torabi, Jeff Ma, Valerie Buzaglo and Hamza Alhbian (via skype) had only 48 hours to design a Disaster Response Hospital for civil or military use. Their elegant solution, featuring a sophisticated search-and- rescue vehicle, imagined three independent scenarios, anticipating a terrorist attack, a natural disaster, and a humanitarian catastrophe. “It is our belief that every disaster is essentially a personal one and that the key to disaster relief lies in creative approaches to individual rescue relief,” stated the team in its brief.


College of Fellows, Association for Preservation Technology

Congratulations to Adjunct Professor Julia Gersovitz on her induction into the College of Fellows of the Association for Preservation Technology. The College of Fellows honours those APT members who have provided valuable services to the preservation field and to APT. Election to the APT College of Fellows is the highest honour bestowed by APT upon a member of the organization.

For more information on APT, please visit their website.


Schulich Gift

New support for the School of Architecture has arrived from one of Canada's leading philanthropists, Seymour Schulich. Building on Dr. Schulich’s long-standing generosity to McGill, his new gift of $5 million will create fellowships for graduate students in several disciplines, including Architecture. The Schulich gift of $5 million will create generous fellowships for graduate students in a wide variety of areas of study within the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, as well as supporting graduate fellowships in the Schools of Architecture and Urban Planning, and the Departments of Physics, and Mathematics and Statistics. The new Schulich Fellows will receive funding of $25,000 to $100,000 a year.

“Everybody strives to make this a better place for having been here. That’s a big motivator for me,” Dr. Schulich said. His extraordinary generosity to McGill has included a $20-million gift in 2005 to the music faculty (renamed the Schulich School of Music), followed in 2006 by his Golden Violin Award, described as the “Stanley Cup of classical music.” He also established McGill’s Schulich Library of Science and Engineering. As well, Dr. Schulich has an extensive philanthropic legacy with universities and health-care centres across North America and in Israel.

Seymour Schulich is a Canadian business leader with more than 35 years’ experience in the oil and mining industries. In 1978, he pioneered the concept of royalty payments in the mining business, eventually creating the world’s largest royalty resource company with partner Pierre Lassonde. Dr. Schulich is a member of the Order of Canada, and has received four honorary degrees, including a DLitt from McGill in 2004. He credits much of his success in life to a $1,600 scholarship he received while studying for his MBA at McGill. “I doubt very much that I could have achieved what I have in life, without the education that I received at McGill.”

To read the full web release, please visit this McGill webpage.


The Award for Architectural Integration

Atelier Big City (Adjunct Professor Howard Davies, with Anne Cormier and Randy Cohen) has won the Award for Architectural Integration, a special heritage award from the City of Montreal (L'Opération patrimoine architectural de Montréal 2008). This award is presented to a business for its efforts to enhance an old neighbourhood by integrating a new, quality construction into the existing urban fabric. Atelier Big City has won the award with the firm Les Développements D’arcy McGee Ltée for the Unity 2 project at the corner of rue de la Gauchetière Ouest and rue Saint-Alexandre, next to the heritage Unity Building of which it is an extension.

From the award text: "The façade is in tune with the position and proportions of the window openings; the cornice is strikingly prominent; the shape and mix of materials and masonry elements of the new building are consistent with the style of the 1913 building."

To read the full web release, please visit the City of Montreal heritage award webpage.


2008 Venice Biennale in Architecture

Atelier Big City's Centre dʼInterprétation du Bourg de Pabos will form part of the exhibition "41° to 66°: Architecture in Canada – Region, Culture, Tectonics," co-curated by architectural professors John McMinn and Marco Polo and organized by Cambridge Galleries, which will represent Canada at the 2008 Venice Biennale in Architecture. Adjunct Professor Howard Davies, together with Anne Cormier and Randy Cohen, are the principals of local architectural firm Atelier Big City. Since its completion in 1993 the Centre dʼInterprétation du Bourg de Pabos has also been awarded: a Governor General's Award in 1994, the Grand Prize for Architecture by the Quebec Order of Architects (1994), and was cited as one of the most important Canadian buildings of the 20th century by the journal Canadian Architect.


"That's It"...Architecture 2008

Professional M.Arch. student Jennifer Thorogood is one of three winners in the "That's It"...Architecture 2008 competition organized by Art-City & Peepshow International in Calgary. The objective of the competition was to choose an edge condition and to investigate the occurrence of an apostrophe between the objects. The winners will be flown to Calgary to enact their apostrophic forms onto sites at 1:1 scale for the Art-City festival. It will be a collaborative affair with the other winners, volunteers and public to take place September 10-13, 2008, with the opening Sept. 12th at Olympic plaza. Winners will receive free flight and accommodations and $1000. The winning submissions/constructions will also be published.

For full details, please see the Art-City call for proposals [.pdf].


International Illumination Design Awards

Professional M.Arch. student Ben Mitchell and Bjarne Pedersen, principal architect of Architectural Lighting Design in Oakville (Ontario), have been awarded the Paul Waterbury Award for Outdoor Lighting Design (Special Citation for Energy-Conscious Facade Lighting) for their work on the flagship Umbra store on Queen Street in Toronto. This award is one of four parallel program awards given out by the Illuminating Engineers Society (IES) in their International Illumination Design Awards (IIDA) program. The Special Citation recognizes superior elements of an outstanding lighting design.

For further details and photographs please see the full list of IIDA 2008 Awards [.pdf] winners.


Power Corporation of Canada Awards at the CCA

Professional M.Arch. student Per Kefgen and post-professional M.Arch. (Urban Design option) student Shannon Harvey are two of three recipients of the 2008 Power Corporation of Canada Awards at the CCA. The award offers students enrolled in the Master of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Environmental Design or Urban Design programs across Canada a three-month residency at the CCA during the summer of 2008 in which to undertake a common research project and to benefit from the collections and resources of the institution. Each recipient receives a $7000 stipend. The other student award holder is Tomek Bartczak (Toronto). The three recipients are working on a collaborative research project on cold environments. Full details on CCA website.

Contact: asornin [at] cca [dot] qc [dot] ca (Alexis Sornin)

This is the fifth consecutive year that McGill Architecture students have won the CCA Power Corporation Award. Previous winners are Julia Tischer (2007), Catherine Vandermeulen (2006), Peter Sealy (2005), and Lian Chang (2004).


National Urban Design Awards

The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC), Canadian Institute of Planners (CIP), and Canadian Society of Landscape Architects (CSLA) have awarded a 2008 National Urban Design Award in the category Urban Fragments to the project "Making the Edible Campus" of McGill University. The lead firm of the project is the Minimum Cost Housing Group (School of Architecture), directed by Prof. Vikram Bhatt with assistance from Leila Farah (PhD candidate). Advisors on the project are Profs. Nik Luka and Jeanne Wolfe. Graduate students who worked on the project are Ehsan Daneshyar, Sally Diaz, Jie Liu, Anne-Marie Malouin, Gaurav Sharma, Aba Simpson, and Ivan Soto. Associate firms are Santropol Roulant (Jane Rabinowicz, executive director, and Tim Murphy, event organizer) and Alternatives (Ismael Hautecoeur, project coordinator, and Rotem Ayalon, coordination). Vital collaboration at McGill was provided by Planning and Institutional Analysis (Chuck Adler, Director) and Building Services and Grounds (Facilities Management and Development).

From the jury comments: "Amongst the interesting 'fragments' submitted from across the country, the jury appreciated the social foundations and community/volunteer involvement as well as the sustainable urban objectives of this scheme. With simple, direct layouts it aims to employ underused corners and spaces within the public realm to grow produce linked to a food collection and meal delivery system, creating a sustainable prototype that could potentially be expanded to other university campuses and across the city."

The National Urban Design Awards are part of a two-tier program held in co-operation with major metropolitan centres in Canada. They will be presented by the presidents of the RAIC, CIP, and CSLA on June 27 during the Architects Association of New Brunswick / RAIC Conference and Festival of Architecture in Fredericton.

To read the media release, please visit the RAIC award webpage. To view the full list of recipients (with links), please visit the following RAIC webpage. And to view the the Edible Campus project on the Minimum Cost Housing Group website, please visit the following webpage.


Annual Staff Award of Excellence in the Faculty of Engineering

Mary Lanni-Campoli, Student Advisor and Program Administrator at the School, has been awarded the 2008 Annual Staff Award of Excellence in the Faculty of Engineering (managerial category). The award was presented to Mary by Dean Christophe Pierre at a reception to honour the award winners in the Trottier Building on May 13. In his citation, the Dean described Mary as "literally, the face and identity of the School for every one of the 200+ professional program students, for prospective students and their families, for visitors and returning graduates and for the international community with whom we interact on so many levels." He added that her "dedication and contributions have been consistently exceptional." Mary was cheered on by professors and her staff colleagues from the School.


David Thomson Award for Excellence in Graduate Supervision and Teaching

Alberto Pérez-Gómez, Saidye Rosner Bronfman Professor of the History of Architecture, has been awarded the 2008 David Thomson Award for Excellence in Graduate Supervision and Teaching by the McGill GPSO (Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office). The announcement by Prof. Martin Kreiswirth, Associate Provost (Graduate Education) and Dean of GPSO, praised Prof. Pérez-Gómez's contribution to graduate education at McGill, citing in particular his inspirational mentorship. The award and a citation will be presented at the Faculty of Engineering convocation ceremony on May 28.


SSHRC Standard Research Grant

Associate Professor Martin Bressani has received a Standard Research Grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) in the amount of $105,000 (over three years). Prof. Bressani is Principal Investigator on the grant, and, together with Prof. Marc Grignon (History) from Laval University, will research the topic "Immersion into Atmosphere: History and the Fictional Dimension of Architectural Experience (1770-1890)."

Prof. Bressani provides the following summary: "The research programme inquires into the fictional dimension of architecture, understood as a building's power to 'reconfigure reality' following Nelson Goodman's argument about art's capacity to create 'possible worlds.' Our hypothesis is that this fictional experience is triggered in architecture mainly through a manipulation of the senses: the creation of an immersive atmosphere capable of transporting the beholder in an alternative universe. In a manner comparable to Michael Fried's studies on painting and the beholder in Modern Europe, we consider that the evolution of modern architecture, normally seen as a sequence of self-contained periods or movements - neo-classicism, neo-gothic, eclecticism, modernism, etc. - could advantageously be grasped as a single undertaking, primarily concerned with the question of the observer and his/her position as a sensible subject in relation to the works (Fried, 1980). So, following Fried's insight on the history of modern painting, we believe the theme of absorption to be crucial in the development of modern architecture; but whereas absorption in Fried's analysis was understood as a means to displace through identification the viewer into the 'world' of the painting, in architecture the same theme involves a stronger corporeal element, absorption becoming immersion, as the experience of any given atmosphere posits a total physical involvement. It implies, we believe, a new psychology of experience that defies notions of a strongly bounded self and, therefore, the stability of the real."


Lyceum Traveling Fellowship in Architecture

Three third-year undergraduate McGill Architecture students have received top awards in the 2008 Lyceum Traveling Fellowship in Architecture competition. Gabrielle Marcoux was awarded second prize (a $6,000 travel fellowship), Jason Tsironis was awarded one of two equal third prizes (a $1,000 grant), and Vuk Krcmar-Grkavac was awarded one of three merit awards. The McGill submissions were projects developed in the U3 studio sections of Prof. Martin Bressani and of Profs. David Theodore and Tom Balaban.

The Lyceum Fellowship was established in 1985 to advance the development of the next generation of talent by creating a vehicle for stimulating perceptive reasoning and inspiring creative thought in architecture. Through a unique structure of design competition and prize winning travel grants it seeks to establish a dialogue through design among selected schools of architecture. The Lyceum Competition welcomes submissions from students attending one of the 12 participating schools. This year's competition theme was "Intergenerational Center for the City of Los Angeles: Grandparent Housing, Senior Center and Head Start." The 2008 jury chair and program author was Monica Ponce de Leon, Principal, Office dA, Inc., Boston, MA.

For additional information on the 2008 competition, please visit the Lyceum website.


CFI Leaders Opportunity Fund

Associate Professor and Director of the School Michael Jemtrud has been awarded $199,793 in funding for the Facility for Architectural Research in Media and Mediation (FARMM) through the Canada Foundation for Innovation's Leaders Opportunity Fund. The funding is part of a total of $22.5 million awarded to 134 projects at 31 institutions across Canada ($5,989,221 of this funding was awarded to 31 projects in Quebec, of which $1,449,225 was awarded to 10 projects at McGill). FARMM has been established for the research and development of digital media related to architectural and urban design, engineering, and related cultural and artistic activities.

For information on the Leaders Opportunity Fund, please visit the CFI LOF webpage.


Écologez Integrated Design for Green Building Competition

Two McGill students were part of the team that won first prize in the Écologez Integrated Design for Green Building Competition (March 8 and 9, 2008): Aurore Paluel-Marmont (U2, Architecture) and Stanley Tran (Civil Engineering). The six other winning team members are students from Laval, Concordia, UQAM and U de M. The objective of the project was to design the Montreal Biosphere as it would be in the year 2017 on its 50th anniversary. The competition's aim was to offer students a unique opportunity to participate, in a multidisciplinary team, in the integrated design process of an ecological building.

For additional information on the competition, please visit Écologez's webpage. A link is provided to a presentation of the winning scheme (Team 6).


PS1 Design Competition

Every year in New York City, the PS1 Contemporary Art Center hosts an architectural design competition to design a temporary, outdoor summer stage for the PS1 Warm-up Music Festival. While last year’s winning design was all about providing a space for dancing, this year’s temporary structure, designed by Work Architecture (Amale Andraos [BArch 1996] and Dan Wood), is all about green. The goal was to create a temporary space that was groundbreaking in terms of architecture, eye-catching, and had an innovative use of technology and production. Work Architecture (www.work.ac) met all of those requirements in their stunning green design, as well as provoking an interesting dialogue on the environment and the reuse of spaces.

For further information on this PS1 project, please check the following webpage.


Tradewell Fellowship - WHR Architects, Houston

Diana Anderson (M.Arch. 2004) has won the Tradewell Fellowship for 2008-2009. Named in honor of the late Gary Tradewell, a former Vice President and medical planner of WHR Architects in Houston, the Tradewell Fellowship was created to build careers of aspiring healthcare architects. Each year, the Tradewell Fellow is involved with clients in early master planning and design with a particular focus on healing environments and collaborative design methods. The Fellowship begins and ends in July and includes employment at WHR Architects in Houston.

For additional information on the fellowship, please visit WHR's webpage.


Medicine By Design by Annmarie Adams published by University of Minnesota Press

Medicine by Design: The Architect and the Modern Hospital, 1893-1943, by William C. Macdonald Professor Annmarie Adams, has been published by the University of Minnesota Press in the series Architecture, Landscape, and American Culture.

In the history of medicine, hospitals are usually seen as passive reflections of advances in medical knowledge and technology. In Medicine by Design, Prof. Adams challenges these assumptions, examining how hospital design influenced the development of twentieth-century medicine and demonstrating the importance of these specialized buildings in the history of architecture.

For additional information on the book, please visit the publisher's webpage.


atelier T.A.G. wins the Professional Prix de Rome in Architecture

The Canada Council for the Arts has awarded the Professional Prix de Rome in Architecture (January 15, 2008) to Adjunct Professors Manon Asselin and Katsuhiro Yamazaki of the Montreal firm atelier T.A.G. The prize will enable Ms. Asselin and Mr. Yamazaki to study how current socio-economic and political environments redefine the activities of young architectural offices.

The Canada Council's Professional Prix de Rome in Architecture is valued at $50,000 and encourages the development of artistic excellence in contemporary architectural practice. Ms. Asselin and Mr. Yamazaki will record interviews with young innovative architects and research studio activities, building projects and construction sites underway in Europe, East Asia and New York City. After their research is complete, they will present a multi-media exhibition which will highlight and compare their findings within a Canadian context.

For additional information on atelier T.A.G. and the Prix de Rome, please visit the following webpage.


Volvo Research and Educational Foundations: Future Urban Transport programme

Assistant Professor Nik Luka has been awarded $109,000 for 2008 by the Future Urban Transport programme supported by the Volvo Research and Educational Foundations (VREF) for his project entitled "Optimising Public Transport Infrastructure for Sustainable City-Building and Urban Regeneration: Whole-Corridor Urban Design Strategies." The funding is renewable for a second year in 2009, at the same amount.

This project explores a fundamental city-building question: How can we make more of the unrealised potential in existing urban infrastructure, and how can we engage local communities in urban regeneration projects to make the most of new public-transit infrastructure? It takes a whole-corridor approach to address urban form, activity, and regulatory instruments in the areas flanking five public transit axes in Montréal: two existing metro lines and three proposed new tramway lines. Bringing together planners, engineers, architects, and students in the new post-professional graduate option (M.Arch.) in Urban Design, it will explore urban design strategies for optimising these existing and proposed public trunk public-transit lines. Centred in the Urban Design studio, it will actively engage local residents and other private- and public-sector stakeholders in a participatory charrette process to develop detailed design and policy interventions to help maximise public transport use while optimising the benefits of the infrastructure itself for city-building and urban regeneration.

For additional information on the Future Urban Transport programme supported by the VREF, please visit the following webpage.


CCA Charrette

A McGill team of five U2 Architecture students shared first prize this year with a team from Laval and U de M in the 13th edition of the CCA’s Interuniversity Charrette (October 25 to 29, 2007). Second-year undergraduate students Valerie Lechene, Leah Bell, Aurore Paluel, Hannah McDonald, and Marie El-Nawar (under the supervision of Adjunct Professor Francois Emond) competed against 32 other teams from McGill, U de M, Laval, UQAM, Carleton and Ryerson.

The CCA Charrette (October 25 to 29, 2007) engaged the dialogue of cultural diversity in public spaces. The call for ideas and proposals concerned a major Montreal street (Côte des Neiges Road between Queen Mary Road to the south and Jean Talon Street to the north) whose topography, architecture and local population would inspire a new way of thinking about the city and public spaces, in opening the project to all senses and all voices, in time as well as in space. Participants were free to use the techniques and graphic languages of their choice in expressing their imaginative approaches.

For full details on the charrette, please visit the CCA charrette webpage for 2007.


Two Honours for Emeritus Professor Zuk

On October 20, Emeritus Professor Radoslav Zuk received a Shevchenko Medal during the XXII Triennial Ukrainian Canadian Congress held in Winnipeg from October 19 to 21, 2007. "The Shevchenko Medal is the highest form of recognition that can be granted by the Ukrainian Canadian Congress," and has been awarded to Prof. Zuk "in recognition of his significant contribution to the development of Ukrainian culture in Canada and especially for his outstanding contribution to Ukrainian and Canadian architecture. He successfully integrates a critical and creative approach to the interpretation of the basic elements of Ukrainian culture with the needs and criteria of contemporary architecture."

Earlier in the summer, the Ukrainian Academy of Arts in Kyiv awarded Radoslav Zuk, who has served at the Academy as Head of the State Examination Commission for the granting of degrees in architecture in 2005, 2006 and 2007, a special diploma of appreciation. The document recognizes Prof. Zuk's "significant individual contribution to the development of the National Academy of Fine Arts and Architecture."


Tilting: Rugged Landscape, Strong People, Fragile Architecture

From the website of The Rooms in St. John's, Newfoundland: "A tour through this exhibit is like a trip to Tilting - an outport on the exposed eastern coast of Fogo Island with a remarkable collection of restored traditional houses and outbuildings. Curator Robert Mellin takes us into this living and working community that's home to people who are as much a treasure as the architecture and cultural landscape." The Rooms unites the Provincial Museum, the Provincial Art Gallery and the Provincial Archives of Newfoundland and Labrador under one roof. Prof. Mellin's exhibition on Tilting runs from September 28, 2007, through January 13, 2008, on Level 2 of The Rooms Provincial Museum.

For additional information and photographs, please visit the following webpage.

One of Robert Mellin's architectural projects will be featured on the television series Homes By Design which airs each Tuesday beginning October 9, 2007, on the FTChannel. The segment on Prof. Mellin's project will be on episode HD-605: Seaside Homes.


New Director of School: Michael Jemtrud

 

Announcement by Christophe Pierre, Dean, Faculty of Engineering (August 15, 2007)

I am pleased to announce the appointment of Professor Michael Jemtrud as the Director of the School of Architecture, effective immediately.

Michael is no stranger to McGill University, having obtained his Master of Architecture at McGill in 2000 after having obtained a Bachelor of Science in Architecture, a Bachelor of Architecture (Professional) and a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy, all in 1993 from the Pennsylvania State University. Since graduating from McGill, he has carved out an academic career in the School of Architecture at Carleton University, becoming an Associate Professor in 2005, along with a cross-appointment to the Institute of Cultural Studies in Literature, Arts and Culture, Cultural Mediations program. He is also the founding Director of the Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS), a University Research Centre, where he has gained considerable leadership experience that he will undoubtedly apply to good effect in his role as Director of the School of Architecture at McGill.

His research area is digital media, collaborative design processes and technology development. His research ideas cover the area of high performance visualization, broadband technologies and collaborative work environments. He helped raise over $15 million in grants, basically as co-PI of a CFI proposal awarded in 2004. He also holds several other significant grants, including an SSHRC collaboration headed by Professor Alberto Perez-Gomez of McGill’s School of Architecture. There is considerable potential for future collaborations with the fields of computer engineering, medicine and communications.

I trust that you will join me in welcoming Professor Jemtrud back to McGill. We are confident that he will lead the School of Architecture into exciting new territory, whilst maintaining the high standards of teaching and research which the School has established.

 

I would be remiss if I did not add my appreciation to Professor David Covo who has been Director for the School of Architecture since 1996.

David raised the profile of the School across campus through dozens of University building projects, showing administration that excellence in design is worth it. His love of the campus is obvious, and he is responsible for many of the trees, benches (and even a sun dial) that we all enjoy.

His administrative accomplishments as Director include much-needed renovations and refurnishing of studios and offices throughout the Macdonald-Harrington Building. Academically, David’s accomplishments include increasing the involvement of practicing architects in the daily life of the School, recognizing the important role of adjunct professors, overseeing the growth of the Ph.D. program from its ad hoc beginnings to its current enrolment of 33 students, navigating the smooth transition from the B.Arch. to the professional Masters in 1999, and as Chairman of the Canadian Architectural Certification Board (accreditation), having an impact at the national level on the standards of architectural education.

As well, his ongoing networking with alumnae has resulted in significant financial support for the School over the years.

Finally, David’s unique personality and manner have been much appreciated by both students and staff; his soft-spoken, diplomatic, and modest character, his dry sense of humour and love of drawing, his approachability, and the personal interest he has shown for each student in the school.

Please join me in saluting David Covo’s dedication and many accomplishments as Director of the School of Architecture, and in wishing him much success and happiness in the future.


Sustainable Residential Development: Planning and Design for Green Neighbourhoods

Professor Avi Friedman’s 7th book, Sustainable Residential Development: Planning and Design for Green Neighbourhoods, has been published by McGraw-Hill. The book presents a much needed guideline for creating communities that balance social, environmental and economical needs. It is packed with plans, vignettes, and elevations that give a head start in planning, designing, constructing and operating sustainable dwellings and neighbourhoods.

For further information on the book, please visit the McGraw-Hill website.


New Silk Road Park, Xi'an, China

Atelier Big City (Adjunct Professor Howard Davies, Anne Cormier, and Randy Cohen) is one of seven winning teams in the New Silk Road competition which explores, in the park of Quijiang's NanHu in Xi'an, the cultural capital of China, the identity of nine different areas and cultures from Europe. Twenty-four projects were submitted by invited teams to the competition. The global design guidelines were defined by Dahan Architectural Design Consulting and Integral Jean Beaudoin.

The New Silk Road Park project promotes a distinctive approach to the design of spaces and expresses cultural identities in the context of globalization. The winning teams of architects and ethnologists will join the master design team in a collaborative workshop in Xi'an to launch the process of intertwining the cultural areas and consolidate the cohesiveness of the park. The park project's theme is to engage the great challenge of defining the meaning of intercultural spaces while remaining respectful to each culture.

For further information on Atelier Big City's winning scheme, please visit the following website.


International Academy for Design and Health

Diana Anderson (M.Arch. 2004) has won the Research Academy Award for her study examining the design of palliative care wards at Bridgepoint Hospital in Toronto. She received the award from the International Academy for Design and Health at its June 2007 conference in Glasgow, Scotland. The award is intended to provide recognition of a researcher whose study is deemed to have exceptionally high potential for future realization and application in the field of promoting health through the built environment.

For further information on the International Academy for Design and Health, please visit the website.


Novi Sad Museum Design Competition

In January 2007 a single-stage international competition was called for the design of the new Museum of Contemporary Art Vojvodina in Novi Sad, Serbia. The jury met in late June to judge the 69 submitted projects and selected three projects for prizes and four for mentions. The first prize was won by the team of Adjunct Professor Robert Claiborne, Ivan Markov, and professional Master's student Lia Ruccolo. All 69 entries will be exhibited in the exhibition space of the museum from July 1 to 15.

For further information on the competition, please visit the museum website.


Newfoundland Historic Trust Southcott Award

Associate Professor Robert Mellin has won his seventh Southcott Award for the restoration of the Brett house in Joe Batt's Arm, Fogo Island, Newfoundland. The Southcott Awards program was developed by the Newfoundland Historic Trust in 1984 to recognize excellence in the preservation of the architectural heritage of Newfoundland and Labrador.

The Brett house was constructed in two parts: an old hall and parlour plan house originally constructed by John Brett in 1877 which is presently the back part of the house, and a new front addition constructed by his son Charles Brett in 1909, a fisherman who was also in the naval reserve before and during World War I. Over the past three years, Robert Mellin has volunteered his assistance on this project, advising on the repair and restoration of the exterior of the house, the grounds, and the outbuildings. He also assisted with curatorial and visitation issues and on the protection of the interior and artifacts. He presented a paper on the Brett House and premises at the 2007 Vernacular Architecture Forum (VAF) conference in Savannah, Georgia.

What is especially interesting about the Brett house is the sheer quantity of artifacts on the premises, even though many items now reside elsewhere with the Bretts' descendents. Furniture, hooked mats, dishes, books, and family photographs abound in the house. The house could also be featured as a museum of early twentieth century linoleum patterns. The outbuildings contain some items of furniture that were once in the house, and also many tools and items relating to the inshore fishery. The restoration objectives were to stabilize the structure and prevent further deterioration of the exterior and interior (there were some roof leaks in the past that caused damage to artifacts and finishes), and to reinstate certain historic features (skirting boards, storm windows, wood shingles for the roof). The objective was also to inspire a local heritage conservation effort for this project and for other structures/premises in future, as the restoration of the Brett House is one of the first heritage conservation projects in Joe Batt's Arm. A conservative approach with minimal intervention informed decision making for every aspect of the restoration work.

For further information on the Southcott Awards, please visit the Newfoundland Historic Trust website.


OAQ 2007 Architecture Awards of Excellence

A McGill graduate and a McGill part-time teacher are among the winners announced on June 7, 2007, by the Quebec Order of Architects (OAQ) in the 24th edition of the Architecture Awards of Excellence. In the category of heritage conservation and restoration projects, School of Architecture Adjunct Professor Pierina Saia (with her partner Réal Paul) won the Prix d'Excellence for their project Pavillon du Lac-aux-Castors au Parc du Mont Royal. In the category of sustainable development, School graduate Patricia Sarrazin-Sullivan (Box Architectures, together with Bosses Design) won an Honourable Mention for Camp Musical CAMMAC. Finalists in the OAQ awards included Adjunct Professor and graduate Howard Davies (Atelier Big City) for Les Jardins du Y des Femmes in the category of multi-unit residential projects, and graduate Manon Asselin (Atelier T.A.G.) for Théâtre du Vieux-Terrebonne in the category of cultural projects.

For further information on the OAQ Awards of Excellence, please visit the OAQ awards webpage.


Canada Post Marks RAIC Centennial

To celebrate the centennial of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC), Canada Post has issued (on May 9) a set of four domestic rate stamps that feature signature pieces by architects who have received the RAIC Gold Medal as well as the Order of Canada. The architects and their works are Douglas Cardinal, St. Mary's Church (1969); Arthur Erickson, University of Lethbridge (1971); Raymond Moriyama, Ontario Science Centre (1969); and Moshe Safdie, National Gallery of Canada (1988). Three of these architects - Erickson, Safdie and Moriyama - studied architecture at McGill: Erickson and Safdie received their professional degrees (B.Arch.) from McGill, while Moriyama received a post-professional M.Arch. These same three architects also hold Honorary Doctorates from McGill.

On the subject of the strong McGill representation, the Director of the School, David Covo, commented, "It is evidence of the role that McGill grads have played, and continue to play, not only in the design and construction of our built environment but also in the shaping of the profession itself. It is also worth noting that the three - all four, in fact - are frequent visitors to Schools of Architecture in Canada and around the world, where their work and ideas about buildings and cities continue to inspire teachers and students alike." Prof. Covo added, "The stamps celebrate the centennial of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada with images of buildings - not only great but iconic works of architecture - that have become part of Canada's cultural landscape. They are as much a part of our national identity as Niagara Falls, the Canadian Pacific railroad and the Rocky Mountains. The architects whose works are celebrated on these stamps are four of Canada's best known 'architects-laureate'. The list could have been much longer, and the RAIC and Canada Post had to make some difficult choices...These stamps remind us that we are defined by the environments we create, and the RAIC deserves full credit for having put this terrific initiative together. "

For full details on the stamps and their issue, please visit the Canada Post webpage.

Article in the McGill Reporter.


6th Annual SSEF Architectural Student Design Competition 2007

For the third year in a row, students from the School have won the Award of Merit in the SSEF Architectural Student Design Competition. Students were challenged to design a tower on a site of the designers’ choosing. While the purpose, scope and scale of the tower were left to the discretion of the designer, it was important to focus on what it means to engage and experience structure as "Up." The structure had to be primarily steel but otherwise the material palette was open. The winning team was composed of Architecture U2 students Valerie Buzaglo and Serena Lee and Civil Engineering students Jennifer Marshall, Dominique Nguyen-Huy and Nisreen Balh. The Award of Merit comes with a $2,000 prize for the team and a $1,000 prize for the faculty supervisor (Pieter Sijpkes).


SSHRC Major Collaborative Research Initiative

Associate Professor Ricardo L. Castro is a successful co-applicant in a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) competition for Major Collaborative Research Initiatives (MCRI). The title of the project is The Hispanic Baroque: Complexity in the First Atlantic Culture, and the principal investigator is Juan Luis Suárez of The University of Western Ontario. The value of the initiative is $2,500,000, with a duration of seven years.

The objective of the project is three-fold: a) to establish how individual and collective identities were transformed and reshaped by the conflicts arising from colonization, resistance, "mestizaje," and isolation through the study of significant cases (i.e., black culture in the Caribbean and the role of "cofradías" in a tropical Baroque; Creole elites and the incorporation of an urban culture; reshaping of indigenous identities through the use of European music in the missions of the Bolivian jungle) which are paradigmatic of transatlantic relations from 1600 to 1815; b) to determine the various mechanisms that gave rise to the Hispanic Baroque, and specifically, the role played in this process by the resulting technologies of culture, and by the transnational organizations involved in it; c) to map conceptually the expansion of Neobaroque expressions in the Atlantic rim at the turn of the 21st Century, to determine how these expressions use elements from the historical Baroque, and how they inform the cultural settings in which they grow. These objectives will allow the researchers to determine the internal cycles of the Baroque culture as well as the sequencing of its transitions at the same time that they trace the structural elements that the Neobaroque takes from the Hispanic Baroque and analyze the causes of their efficiencies in the age of globalization.

Visit the SSHRC website for the full list of co-applicants.


The Alcuin Society Awards for Excellence in Book Design in Canada

The Alcuin Society has announced the winners of its 25th annual Awards for Excellence in Book Design in Canada. In the Pictorial category, Arthur Erickson: Critical Works, by Nicholas Olsberg and Associate Professor Ricardo L. Castro (published by Douglas & McIntyre, designed by Peter Cocking) has won third prize. The judges selected 34 winning titles from 252 entries; 96 publishers from nine provinces participated. The winning books will be exhibited internationally at the Frankfurt and Leipzig Book Fairs, and, in Canada: in Halifax; Wolfville (NS); Montréal; Ottawa; Toronto; Edmonton; Vancouver; and Victoria (BC).

The Alcuin Society is a voluntary association of people who care about the past, present and future of fine books. Founded in 1965 by Geoff Spencer and six other Vancouver bibliophiles, it is the only non-profit organization in Canada dedicated to the entire range of interests related to books and reading. These interests include authorship, publishing, book design and production, bookselling, book buying and collecting, printing, binding, papermaking, calligraphy and illustration.

Visit the Alcuin Society website for further information.


FQRSC Postdoctoral Fellowship

McGill PhD candidate Kai Wood Mah, who teaches design and architectural history and theory at the Department of Architecture and Planning at Dalhousie University, Halifax, is the recipient of a postdoctoral fellowship from FQRSC (Fonds Québécois de la Recherche sur la société et la culture). With a value of $64,000 and a duration of two years, the fellowship was awarded for a project entitled Inventing Home: Architecture of the Rural and the Industrial Schools in Turn-of-the-Century Canada. Kai will assume his fellowship in Vancouver at the School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at the University of British Columbia. Recent publications by Kai Wood Mah include a refereed journal article (“Classified landscapes of education: the Ontario Educational Exhibition of 1876,” Visual Studies, Vol.22, no.1, April 2007) and a book chapter (“Re-constructing Blackness: Fanny Jackson Coppin and the Institute for Colored Youth” in Transitions: Race, Culture, and the Dynamics of Change, edited by Hanna Wallinger [Hamburg: LIT Verlag Press, 2006]).


Great Unsolved Mysteries in Canadian History

Annmarie Adams, David Theodore, and a team of researchers are developing a new case study for the award-winning website, Great Unsolved Mysteries in Canadian History. The intention of the website, funded by Heritage Canada, is to provide students with an array of primary sources and to inspire them to solve the mysteries through critical thinking. The mystery is the sudden death of 62-year old Ada Redpath and her 24-year old son, Clifford, in their Square Mile mansion on Montreal's Sherbrooke Street West on June 13, 1901. Adams and Theodore will emphasize how architecture reveals differences in social class and illuminates contemporary notions of medical conditions, particularly depression and epilepsy. A coroner's report of the time concluded that Clifford Redpath shot his melancholic mother while temporarily insane during an epileptic fit. The details of the case, however, cast some doubt on this theory. The Redpath mystery will be launched in March 2008.


CCA Power Corporation of Canada Award

Post-professional M.Arch. student Julia Tischer (Minimum Cost Housing Group) is one of three recipients of the 2007 Power Corporation of Canada Awards. The award offers students enrolled in the Master of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Environmental Design or Urban Design programs across Canada a three-month residency at the CCA during the summer of 2007 in which to undertake a common research project and to benefit from the collections and resources of the institution. Each recipient receives a $7000 stipend. The other two student award holders are Olive Bailey (Calgary) and Kate Patterson (Toronto). The three recipients are working on a collaborative research project on urban agriculture in Canada. Full details on CCA website.

Contact: asornin [at] cca [dot] qc [dot] ca (Alexis Sornin)

This is the fourth consecutive year that a McGill student has won the Power Corporation Award. Previous winners are Catherine Vandermeulen (2006), Peter Sealy (2005), and Lian Chang (2004).


Two Professors Awarded SSHRC Research/ Creation Grants

Two Architecture professors have been awarded grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Research/Creation Grants in Fine Arts program.

Pieter Sijpkes, Associate Professor, and Jorge Angeles (NSERC Chair in Design Engineering, Centre for Intelligent Machines, Faculty of Engineering) have received a $173,000 SSHRC Research/Creation Grant for their project The New Architecture of Phase Change: Computer Assisted Ice Construction. Based at the School of Architecture, this three-year study will use computer numerically controlled (CNC) digital fabrication to construct buildings out of ice. Working with part-time Architecture faculty Thomas Balaban and David Theodore, and including students from robotics, this ground-breaking program builds on experimental teaching and research into the design of ice structures by adapting McGill’s impressive expertise in rapid prototyping and engineering design for extreme environments. The outcomes will lead to inhabitable, environmentally-friendly, digitally-fabricated ice architecture.

Alberto Pérez-Gómez, Saidye Rosner Bronfman Professor of the History of Architecture, has been awarded a SSHRC Research/Creation Grant to support a new collaborative project entitled AutoCAD Ballet: Tools for Digital and Material Inhabitation. The research funds ($173,000 over three years) will support research into the use of new media technologies to design virtual and built architectural spaces. The project marks the beginning of collaborations with Michael Jemtrud, Director of the Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS), and Douglas Cooper, a writer and new media artist currently based in Mexico, as well as the continuation of long-standing collaborations with Louise Pelletier at the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) École de Design, Jorge Pérez-Gómez at the University of New Mexico Department of Music, and José Cabral Filho, at the Department of Design at the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais in Brazil.


CMHC EQuilibrium Sustainable Housing Competition

Twelve Canadian homebuilder teams have been selected as winners of Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation's (CMHC) EQuilibrium sustainable housing competition. Recent Architecture graduate Masa Noguchi (PhD 2004), currently a Lecturer at the Mackintosh Environmental Architecture Research Unit at the Glasgow School of Art, is architect of one of the winning submissions: the Alouette Homes EQuilibrium Initiative home which will be built in Eastman, QC. EQuilibrium housing combines energy-efficient design with renewable energy systems to minimize energy consumption and reduce environmental impact. Each winning team will receive $50,000 from CMHC to offset eligible costs, including those relating to documenting the projects, performance testing, and demonstrating the homes publicly. In addition, CMHC will work with the winning teams to provide technical and promotional support, and will monitor and report on the performance of the houses. The winning projects were chosen by independent housing experts from a total of 72 homebuilder teams that submitted applications in July 2006 through a two-stage competitive process. The demonstration homes will be open to Canadians to view by 2008, after which CMHC will explore opportunities to advance EQuilibrium housing principles more broadly across the housing industry.

Please visit the CMHC website for information on EQuilibrium Housing.


Steel Structures Education Foundation Award Winners

The Director of the School is pleased to announce the inaugural winners of the Steel Structures Education Foundation (SSEF) Awards for Excellence in steel research (for first-year students in the professional undergraduate program) and design in steel (for thesis students in the professional Master's program). This year’s third Award for Excellence (design in steel) will be granted to one or more of the third-year students graduating with a B.Sc. (Arch.) this spring.

This year’s Award for Excellence in steel research goes to U1 students Ann Rodgers, Bori Yoon and Chloe Malek for their paper "Beijing Olympic Stadium 2008 as Biomimicry of a Bird’s Nest." The award includes a $500 prize. (Read the winning paper [.pdf].)

This year’s Award for Excellence in steel design goes to M2 thesis student Josiane Tardif for her thesis project "The Redevelopment of the McGill Engineering Complex." The award includes a $1500 prize.

The three awards for U1, U3, and M2 students will also be given out in 2008 and 2009, all generously funded by the SSEF.

Please visit the SSEF website.


Nineteenth Century Studies Association 2007 Emerging Scholar Award

SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow (2004-06) Cynthia Hammond is the recipient of the 2007 Emerging Scholar Award sponsored by the Nineteenth Century Studies Association (NCSA) for her article, "Reforming Architecture, Defending Empire: Florence Nightingale and the Pavilion Hospital," which appeared in a special issue of Studies in the Social Sciences XXXVIII (July 2005).

For more information on the NCSA, please visit their website.


Southbank International Architectural Competition

The winner of the Southbank International Architecture Competition (announced January 20, 2007) is the submission entitled “Collage,” by Thread Collective & Normal Design, a collaborative team of architects, landscape architects and public art practitioners based in Brooklyn. Recent graduate Nazia Aftab (M.Arch. 2006) was part of the winning team. The competition called on architects and designers to define and apply new spatial approaches in order to create a community that would serve as a model for sustainable living elsewhere on the continent and beyond. The singular idea that differentiated the winning scheme was the integration of the Africa Centre and the residential community, achieved by the positioning of its key elements throughout the housing component of the scheme. It responded to the aspirations and spirit of the brief: that the Africa Centre gives a character and energy to the community, and that the community in turn contributes to the activities of the Centre. The authors propose to make a compact settlement that has some of the benefits of the urban rather than the suburban condition, while reconciling with its rural context. This is crucial for ecological sustainability as it preserves natural landscapes and minimises the land area and the material used in development. It also helps to minimise energy demands and provision of services. The nature of the scheme acknowledges transformation as a generative principle.

For more information, please visit the Southbank Competition website.


McGill MBA Students + Architecture PhD Student Capture International Title

A team of five students from McGill University have been recognized as the "Most Innovative MBA Team in the World" at the 2006 Innovation Challenge competition at the University of Virginia's Darden Graduate School of Business, beating out 439 teams of graduate business students from around the globe. The world's largest competition for business innovation, the event attracted teams from 88 universities who competed to present solutions to real-world problems facing major corporations. Desautels Faculty of Management MBA candidates Heather Powers, Kanhaiya Sinha, Stavros Tsokonas and Luc Tran and Architecture doctoral student Jonathan Powers developed the two winning programs in the final round on November 17 and 18. Their entries, which garnered a $20,000 prize, focused on helping DaimlerChrysler to connect with baby boomers, and Hilton Hotels to grow through partnerships.

For more information, please visit the Innovation Challenge website.


McGill's Formal Degree Options in Urban Design

Applications are invited for McGill's new options in Urban Design for the academic session beginning in September 2007. Students can specialize in this growing field of practice through one of two degrees: the post-professional Master of Architecture (M.Arch.) and the Master of Urban Planning (M.U.P.). Details of this latter option are outlined on the School of Urban Planning website.

McGill's M.Arch. Urban Design option is a 12-month, 45-credit course of study. It is open to students with a professional degree in Architecture, although applicants with a degree in a related field may be considered in special cases. All courses and studio projects are conducted in English. Knowledge of French is useful in the bilingual context of Montreal but it is not a requirement.

Urban Design at McGill emphasizes the acquisition of skills pertaining to the analysis and the design of the built environment, whether in existing urban districts or in newly-built areas. Our Urban Design options have been developed with a strong commitment to reflexive practice, to conducting research that can inform and improve design quality, to involving those who will be affected by city design decisions, and to promoting a long-range perspective on the consequences of actions that shape the urban environment. From the making of "good" streets and other types of public places to the reshaping of postwar suburban landscapes, Urban Design at McGill centres on the roles that Architecture and Planning can play in changing the form of urban districts and metropolitan regions. Our general aim is to provide professionals with the knowledge and imagination that they will need to engage the community in a meaningful debate on the nature of urban space and generate creative and sustainable solutions for our cities. The opportunity to study Urban Design within the framework of McGill's well-established post-professional M.Arch. program will be particularly attractive to students who wish to pursue careers in public agencies and private consulting firms where a credential in Urban Design is important.

The Urban Design program at McGill offers graduate-level (second-cycle) education from an institution that is recognized and acclaimed throughout Quebec, across North America, and overseas. The McGill Schools of Architecture and of Urban Planning are situated in the heart of Montreal, an urban context known for the quality of its public realm and the richness of its built environment. While many university programs in Planning and Architecture have weak links (if any at all), McGill's new Urban Design program reflects a longstanding collaboration between its School of Architecture and School of Urban Planning. For several decades, Urban Design has been an essential element of the Architecture and Urban Planning curricula, which have been offered formally at McGill since 1896 and 1947 (respectively). The newly-formalized Urban Design options will also complement a proposed Master of Urban Design (M.U.D.) program to be offered jointly by the Schools of Architecture and Urban Planning in partnership with the Schools of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Urban Planning at the Université de Montréal.

Please contact Prof. nik [dot] luka [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Nik Luka) , Urban Design Program Coordinator, for further details.

Please visit the Urban Design website.

The application deadline for the M.Arch. programme is January 1. Applicants to the Urban Design option are expected to meet the general requirements of the post-professional M.Arch. program.


Arcus Endowment Scholar-in-Residence

William C. Macdonald Professor of Architecture, Annmarie Adams, will be on familiar turf when she arrives at the University of California Berkeley as the first Arcus Endowment Scholar-in-Residence. Adams, who holds an MArch and a PhD from Berkeley, won the award following an open nomination process. She hopes to take up the position and to teach a graduate seminar in 2008. The seminar, "Sex and the Single Building," will explore a number of everyday places — bars, gyms, hospitals, spas, brothels, beauty parlours and hotels — where body care of all types is played out. The Arcus award consists of a $40,000 stipend and accommodation for one semester at the Weston Havens house, which was designed in 1939 by Harwell Hamilton Harris. The house was recently bequeathed to the University of California and is considered a masterpiece of 20th-century architecture.


17th Latin American Conference on Health Care Architecture and Engineering - Best Paper Presentation

Gastón Castaño, a graduate of the School's Domestic Environments option in 2006, was awarded the First Prize - Best Paper Presentation for his paper "Bariatrics: Diseñar para Pacientes de Gran Tamaño" (Bariatrics: Design for Large Patients) at the 17º Congreso Latinoamericano de Arquitectura e Ingeniería Hospitalaria (17th Latin American Conference on Health Care Architecture and Engineering) held in Buenos Aires, Argentina, October 10-14, 2006. The paper draws from his McGill research project.


The Paul E. Buchanan Award

Robert Mellin received the 2006 Paul E. Buchanan Award for Excellence in Field Work and Interpretation from the Vernacular Architecture Forum at the VAF annual conference in New York City on June 17, 2006. The award was for his recent heritage conservation work, an exhibition, and heritage conservation planning in Tilting, Fogo Island, Newfoundland. The Tilting Recreation and Cultural Society was a co-recipient of the award. Initiated by the VAF in 1993, the Buchanan Award recognizes excellence in field work and interpretative projects that contribute significantly to our knowledge of vernacular architecture and landscape studies. Further details on VAF website.


CCA Power Corporation of Canada Award

Catherine Vandermeulen (Minimum Cost Housing Group) is one of three recipients of the 2006 Power Corporation of Canada Awards. The award offers students enrolled in the Master of Architecture programs across Canada a three-month residency at the CCA in which to undertake a common research project and to benefit from the collections and resources of the institution. Each recipient receives a $7000 stipend. The other two student award holders are Edward J. Martin (Waterloo) and Nancy Wilson (Toronto). The three recipients are working on a collaborative research project on the city of Montreal and sustainable development, with a specific focus on the transportation system, food, and the connections between city and province. Full details on CCA website.

Contact: asornin [at] cca [dot] qc [dot] ca (Alexis Sornin)

This is the third consecutive year that a McGill student has won the Power Corporation Award. Previous winners are Peter Sealy (2005) and Lian Chang (2004).


5th Annual Steel Structures Education Foundation Architectural Student Design Competition 2006

For the second year in a row, students from the School have won the Award of Merit in the SSEF Architectural Student Design Competition. Students were challenged to design a single span pedestrian bridge, on a site of the designers’ choosing. The structure had to be primarily steel, but otherwise the material palette was open. The winning team was composed of Architecture U2 students Jessica Thatcher and Jennifer Thorogood and Civil Engineering students Mellisa Ouellet and Yunlu Shen. The Award of Merit comes with a $2,000 prize for the team and a $1,000 prize for the faculty supervisor (Pieter Sijpkes). Andrey Dimitrov, winner of last year's Award of Merit in this competition, volunteered his time and expertise in structures to this year's submission and was very helpful with computer imaging.


Four of twelve GG-winning buildings by School adjunct professors

The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC) and the Canada Council for the Arts announced the winners of the 2006 Governor General's Medals in Architecture, Canada's most prestigious national architectural awards program. The awards recognize a maximum of twelve buildings and are given out every second year. The jury is international, and in 2006 included architects from Canada, the US, Great Britain and Denmark. Six of the twelve buildings recognized with medals in 2006 were by firms directed by McGill graduates, and four of these six winning buildings were by adjunct professors in the School.

The adjunct professors are:

  • Manon Asselin, who practices with her husband Katsu Yamazaki (both are graduates), and who will be receiving medals for two projects: Bibliothèque Municipale de Châteauguay and Théâtre du Vieux-Terrebonne
  • Howard Davies, who practices with Anne Cormier and Randy Cohen (all three are McGill graduates), for Unity 2
  • Annie Lebel, who practices with McGill graduate Stephane Pratte, for Structures d'accueil des jardins de Métis

RAIC / Canada Council news release


Eric Bunge wins the Professional Prix de Rome in Architecture

The Canada Council for the Arts has awarded the Professional Prix de Rome in Architecture to Eric Bunge of nARCHITECTS. Thanks to the prize, Mr. Bunge, originally from Montreal and now working in New York, will be able to study the way in which different cultures have invented architectural devices to control heat and light in buildings. Mr. Bunge and his partner, Mimi Hoang, will travel to countries in four distinct climates, including Brazil, Japan, China, Morocco and Finland. The Canada Council’s Professional Prix de Rome in Architecture is valued at $50,000 and encourages the development of artistic excellence in contemporary architectural practice. It will allow Mr. Bunge and Ms. Hoang to document and learn from the way in which cultures in different climates have used such architectural devices as skylights, sunshades, screens, walls and roofs to control light and heat. Their focus will be in part technical and historical, but will predominantly consider the way in which these inventions could be instrumental in defining radical formal, organizational and tectonic possibilities for an imaginative contemporary architectural practice.

Eric Bunge, AIA (member of the American Institute of Architects), was born in 1967 in Montreal. He received a Bachelor of Architecture from McGill University (1991) and a Masters of Architecture from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design (1996). Mr. Bunge is graduate thesis director at the Parsons School of Design, and is a visiting professor in the Urban Design Department at the University of Toronto (Fall 2005). He currently lives in New York. The group nARCHITECTS takes its name from the mathematical variable “n”, a quantity which has infinite possibilities. Its New York-based office was formed in 1999 by Eric Bunge and Mimi Hoang. nARCHITECTS' work focuses on generating new design concepts and techniques for building. Their goal is to achieve maximum effect with an economy of conceptual and material means, while having a positive impact on the environment. This dual interest in the conceptual and material allows them to challenge preconceived notions of program, type and site. The firm periodically develops new fabrication methods and builds their own projects, in addition to working on commissions for residential and institutional clients. This approach has informed their body of both built and unbuilt work in projects such as Canopy, a 30,000-square-foot green bamboo structure containing four distinct environments, which they built in the MoMA/ P.S.1 courtyard in 2004. Other recent projects include Party Wall, an interactive foam wall for Artists Space, and Switch Building – a seven-storey building under construction in Manhattan.

Canada Council news release.

nARCHITECTS website.


Archiprix International Competition 2005

Recent graduate Émilie Bédard, M.Arch. I (prof) ‘04, was recognized with one of six top awards in the international competition Archprix 2005, sponsored by Hunter-Douglas. The biennial competition celebrates achievement in final design thesis projects, and this year attracted 200 entries from 67 countries. Project title: Silo-wet: a Laboratory for the Urban Body. Design thesis advisor: Adrian Sheppard.

More information on the Archiprix International website.


2005 Precast-Prestressed Concrete Institute Architectural Design Competition

The team from the McGill School of Architecture has won the 2005 PCI Architectural Design Competition in the student category (Total Precast Solution). The team is comprised of Nicholas Chan (M1) , Helene Boyer, Cynthia Carbonneau and David Clavey (U3). The supervising professor is Pierre Jampen.

More information on the PCI website.


Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation Travel Grant

McGill School of Architecture SSHRC postdoctoral fellow Cynthia Hammond has been awarded a Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation travel grant of $1000 (US) to support her project, "Catherine Bauer: The Interior of Modernism." The BWAF seeks to advance the status of women practitioners in the architecture professions.

More information on the BWAF website.


4th Annual Steel Structures Education Foundation Architectural Student Design Competition 2005

The intention of this design competition is to provide students of architecture in Canada with a unique opportunity to enter into a design process which brings together, of necessity, concept and reality. Students are challenged to design a single span pedestrian bridge, on a site of the designers’ choosing. The structure must be primarily steel, but otherwise, the material palette is open. This year's Award of Merit ($2,000 prize) was won by U2 student Andrey Dimitrov (faculty sponsor: Pieter Sijpkes).

More information on the 4th Annual SSEF Architectural Student Design Competition 2005 on the SSEF website.


Society for the Study of Architecture in Canada Martin Eli Weil Prize

The Martin Eli Weil prize is awarded annually by the SSAC to the student who submits the best essay on the role played by the built environment in Canadian society. The $250 prize and certificate will be awarded to McGill M.Arch. (Domestic Environments) graduate Lara Pascali at the Society's Annual Conference (this year in Lethbridge, Alberta, 8 to 12 June 2005), where she will be invited to present her essay, "Two Stoves, Two Refrigerators, Due Cucine: The Italian Immigrant Home with Two Kitchens." The winning essay will also be published by the Society in the Journal.

Information on the Martin Eli Weil Prize on the SSAC website.


American Folklore Society Mediterranean Studies Section Best Student Paper Prize

The 2004 AFSMSS Paper Prize Committee (Giovanna P. Del Negro, Chair, Sabina Magliocco & Dorothy Noyes) is pleased to announce that McGill M.Arch. (Domestic Environments) graduate Lara Pascali is the winner of the inaugural competition for her paper entitled "Two Stoves, Two Refrigerators, Due Cucine: The Italian Immigrant Home with Two Kitchens." The AFS Mediterranean Studies Section Best Student Paper Prize comes with a $100 cash award. For more information about the Mediterranean Studies Section of the American Folklore Society, please contact AFSMSS Convener, Giovanna P. Del Negro, at delnegro [at] tamu [dot] edu .

More information on the AFSMSS on their website.


CCA Power Corporation of Canada Award

The Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) is pleased to announce the third year of the Power Corporation of Canada Award. This award provides two fellowships of $10,000 CDN for M.Arch. students in Canada. The annual award has been established to enhance the experience of graduate students in architecture by encouraging their use of the CCA's collection and resources. Full details on CCA website.

Contact: asornin [at] cca [dot] qc [dot] ca (Alexis Sornin)

Congratulations to Peter Sealy (M.Arch. student, professional program), one of two award recipients for 2005, and the second McGill student in a row to win the award. Peter's research proposal is entitled "19th Century Photography and the Architectural Unconscious."

Congratulations to Lian Chang (M.Arch. student, History and Theory), one of two award recipients for 2004. Lian's research proposal is entitled "Festival and Fortification: The Ritual Transformations of Henry II's Royal Entries, 1548-50."


AIA 2004 James J. Souder Fellowship

The American Institute of Architects, Academy of Architecture for Health honours Nirit Pilosof, B.Arch, M.Arch, McGill University, School of Architecture, as the 2004 James J. Souder Fellow. This annual award recognizes the superior achievement of an individual AIA-AHA graduate fellow in healthcare planning and design. The award commemorates the unique contributions of James J. Souder, AIA, AAHC (1911-1999), whose vision led to the creation of the AIA-AHA graduate fellowship in healthcare planning and design, and whose leadership in research and design innovation has inspired generations of hospital and healthcare architects.


Montreal architecture firm wins the new Professional Prix de Rome in Architecture

The Canada Council for the Arts has awarded the Professional Prix de Rome in Architecture to atelier BUILD, a young architecture firm in Montreal. With the proceeds of the prize, practitioners of architecture Michael Carroll (Adjunct Professor at the School) and Danita Rooyakkers of atelier BUILD will be able to enrich their knowledge of architecture in the urban environment and increase their visibility at the international level. The Canada Council for the Arts Professional Prix de Rome in Architecture is valued at $50,000 and encourages the development of artistic excellence in contemporary architectural practice. Atelier BUILD is the first recipient of the new Professional Prix de Rome. Previously, the prize consisted of a one-year stay in an apartment in Rome. This new version allows winners to make shorter visits spread over a two-year period, and to choose destinations that best serve the interests of their practice. These changes were made in consultation with the Canadian architectural community.

Atelier BUILD’s projects are located on marginal, interstitial sites within Montreal’s unique urban fabric. As well as paying attention to the specific local context, atelier BUILD’s design strategies address the larger issues of urban, cultural and ecological sustainability. Atelier BUILD will focus on the Dutch and Japanese, two distinct and mature cultures that have been, in recent decades, on the cutting edge of innovative contemporary architecture. The Professional Prix de Rome will enable atelier BUILD to get a more informed perspective of the world through traveling the globe, experiencing diverse cultures and conversing with architects, critics, artists and scientists.

Canada Council news release.


2003-04 Leading Edge Student Design Competition

The 2003-04 Leading Edge Student Design Competition, now in its 12th year, seeks to support and enhance the study of sustainable and energy-efficient building practices in architectural education. Students and instructors of architecture and design are invited to use the competition as a framework to investigate the use of new materials and strategies for building and to explore the integration of aesthetics and technology for high-performance, cutting-edge architecture. Participants compete for monetary awards which are presented to winning students at the Gold Nuggets Awards ceremony, the premier professional design competition on the West Coast. This year, a Merit Citation in Design Challenge 2 was awarded to U1 student Andrey Dimitrov (advisor: Nadia Meratla) for Innovative Passive Conditioning Strategies.

Leading Edge website.


2003-04 Laboratories for the 21st Century Student Design Competition

Designs from Virginia Tech, Université Laval, and McGill were awarded prizes in the 2003-04 Laboratories for the 21st Century Student Design Competition. The competition, sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), with support from Public Works and Government Services Canada, is administered by the ACSA. The 2003-04 competition program challenged students to design a Laboratory for the 21st Century in the urban context of Georgetown University in Washington, DC. Students were encouraged to be creative in their use of sustainability and low-energy design. Open to students in the U.S. and Canada, the winners were chosen from among 200 submissions. First, second, third prizes and five honourable mentions were awarded. Third prize was awarded to U3 stude nts Mathieu Lemieux-Blanchard and Marie Bourdeau for their submission science as [dissection]u[incision]. The prizes will be exhibited at the 2005 ACSA Annual Meeting in Chicago and at the 2005 AIA Convention in Las Vegas.

ACSA news release [.pdf].


ACSA Collaborative Practice Award