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Researchers on the rise

«McGill Reporter» - 1 hour 58 min ago

(Left to right) Andrew Piper, Paul François and Joelle Pineau are the recipients of the 2015 Principal’s Prize for Outstanding Emerging Researchers. / Photo: Owen Egan

Three high-tech, interdisciplinary professors to be honoured with the Principal’s Prize for Outstanding Emerging Researchers

By Bud Martin

On June 1 and 2, during the Arts A and Science B convocation ceremonies, Principal Suzanne Fortier will take a moment from celebrating the graduating class of 2015 to mark the achievements of another group: three of McGill’s brightest young researchers. Paul François, Joelle Pineau and Andrew Piper are this year’s recipients of the Principal’s Prize for Outstanding Emerging Researchers.

Now in its third year, the $5,000 prize recognizes researchers in the early stages of their careers – whatever their field – who are doing work of particular breadth, quality and merit. Researchers are nominated by the Deans of their Faculty. Faculty members who are no more than 10 years out from their doctorate (or other highest degree) are eligible for the prize.

Paul François

“I’m very happy, very delighted, very honored — and very humbled,” says Paul François, a relative McGill newbie who joined the Department of Physics as an Assistant Professor in 2010. “Being recognized for your work when you’re an early scientist is tremendous, and this award also shows support of biophysics in McGill in general. This is a booming interdisciplinary field, and I am convinced that many progresses, both in fundamental science and for future biomedical applications, will come from interactions between mathematics and physics on the one hand, and biology and medicine on the other hand. We can now consider and observe a cell as a controllable dynamical systems, and this is where physics is very powerful, to identify simple laws and principles.”

Paul François / Photo: Owen Egan

François completed his PhD at the École Normale Supérieure (Université Paris VII) in 2005, then did a postdoctoral fellowship at Rockefeller University. His primary area of research is evolutionary biology, a new field that combines quantum physics, biology and computer science. François uses computational and mathematical tools to model and understand how biological networks – such as our immunity systems, or the cells coordinating embryonic growth – evolve.

The Outstanding Emerging Researchers prize was created by the Office of Research and International Relations. Dr. Rose Goldstein, Vice-Principal (RIR), praises the caliber and impact of Professor François’ work in this emerging field, noting that his use of cutting-edge computation technology is “significantly advancing our understanding of the way immune cells work, providing invaluable insight into how immune diseases develop.”

François will soon be eligible for tenure, so this appreciation comes at a particularly good time. “Early-career recognition is something that, more and more, people are beginning to realize is important – at McGill and elsewhere – because our fields are so competitive, especially when you’re just starting,” he says. “From a very practical and basic standpoint, an award like this helps me when I apply for grants because it shows recognition and support from my university. It’s a little kick. And it builds confidence.”

Joelle Pineau

“I’m pushing the limit of ‘early career,’” laughs Joelle Pineau, an Associate Professor at the School of Computer Science, who joined McGill shortly after receiving her PhD in Robotics from Carnegie Mellon University. “But the quality of researchers we have at McGill is fantastic, so to be chosen like this is special.”

Joelle Pineau / Photo: Owen Egan

Pineau’s research combines basic mathematics with medical robotics to create real-world results with high social impact. As the co-director of the Reasoning and Learning Lab, much of her work focuses on developing decision-making and learning algorithms, then applying them to complex problems in robotics and health-care, such as designing “smart” wheelchairs that can learn how to navigate unfamiliar terrains and understand spoken commands.

Pineau’s work may be heavy on theoretical math, notes Rose Goldstein, but it is also firmly grounded in improving people’s quality of life: “For the care of patients who lack the physical or cognitive abilities to operate conventional motorized wheelchairs, such technology is a ‘game-changer.’”

Pineau is having a particularly good year, having also received a Tomlinson Scientist Award, which recognizes interdisciplinary collaboration, and being named a William Dawson Scholar. Much of her research over the past decade has been interdisciplinary – such as a wide-ranging collaboration with the multi-university Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal to explore issues of social inclusion and participation for people with physical disabilities—which by its very nature entails taking time to establish partnerships, recruit students and acquire funding. “They’re ambitious projects that take time to build up the right knowledge and infrastructure,” she says. “I feel like it is many efforts coming to fruition, and these projects are now reaching a stage of maturity where they’re having impact and getting noticed. It’s exciting and satisfying.”

Andrew Piper

“Post-tenure is a very distinct and in many ways challenging career phase,” notes Andrew Piper. The Associate Professor and William Dawson Scholar joined McGill in 2005, and received tenure in 2012. “Clearing that challenging bar of getting tenure brings a lot of introspection – there are a lot of studies that show this, and I’m certainly not immune to it myself. What happens is you end up with a lot of professional responsibilities – promotion commitments, reviewing manuscripts for presses – that tend to be lower on the satisfaction scale. We call it service work, and it really eats into time for teaching and researching. That space for thinking and creativity tends to get eroded and people go through a period of learning to balance that.

Andrew Piper / Photo: Owen Egan

“An award like this bolsters satisfaction at a key moment: It’s helpful to hear ‘You’re on an important track, keep going’ at this point in my career.”

A former Andrew W. Mellon New Directions Fellow and the current director of .txtLAB, a digital humanities laboratory at McGill, Piper explores the intersection of literature and technologies of reading, past and present. In praising Piper’s avant-garde work, Rose Goldstein cites how he is using new computational methods to develop a data-driven, revolutionary approach to how we think about art forms such as the novel – essentially using technology to uncover patterns and insights hereto hidden. At the same time, she says, he’s also a global thought-leader who is “making an outstanding contribution to larger debates about data-mining and the place of information technology within society.”

“McGill has a very large and talented faculty, across the disciplines,” says Piper, “so to be chosen for this recognition is special, and a real compliment.”

 

Researchers on the rise

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - 1 hour 58 min ago

(Left to right) Andrew Piper, Paul François and Joelle Pineau are the recipients of the 2015 Principal’s Prize for Outstanding Emerging Researchers. / Photo: Owen Egan

Three high-tech, interdisciplinary professors to be honoured with the Principal’s Prize for Outstanding Emerging Researchers

By Bud Martin

On June 1 and 2, during the Arts A and Science B convocation ceremonies, Principal Suzanne Fortier will take a moment from celebrating the graduating class of 2015 to mark the achievements of another group: three of McGill’s brightest young researchers. Paul François, Joelle Pineau and Andrew Piper are this year’s recipients of the Principal’s Prize for Outstanding Emerging Researchers.

Now in its third year, the $5,000 prize recognizes researchers in the early stages of their careers – whatever their field – who are doing work of particular breadth, quality and merit. Researchers are nominated by the Deans of their Faculty. Faculty members who are no more than 10 years out from their doctorate (or other highest degree) are eligible for the prize.

Paul François

“I’m very happy, very delighted, very honored — and very humbled,” says Paul François, a relative McGill newbie who joined the Department of Physics as an Assistant Professor in 2010. “Being recognized for your work when you’re an early scientist is tremendous, and this award also shows support of biophysics in McGill in general. This is a booming interdisciplinary field, and I am convinced that many progresses, both in fundamental science and for future biomedical applications, will come from interactions between mathematics and physics on the one hand, and biology and medicine on the other hand. We can now consider and observe a cell as a controllable dynamical systems, and this is where physics is very powerful, to identify simple laws and principles.”

Paul François / Photo: Owen Egan

François completed his PhD at the École Normale Supérieure (Université Paris VII) in 2005, then did a postdoctoral fellowship at Rockefeller University. His primary area of research is evolutionary biology, a new field that combines quantum physics, biology and computer science. François uses computational and mathematical tools to model and understand how biological networks – such as our immunity systems, or the cells coordinating embryonic growth – evolve.

The Outstanding Emerging Researchers prize was created by the Office of Research and International Relations. Dr. Rose Goldstein, Vice-Principal (RIR), praises the caliber and impact of Professor François’ work in this emerging field, noting that his use of cutting-edge computation technology is “significantly advancing our understanding of the way immune cells work, providing invaluable insight into how immune diseases develop.”

François will soon be eligible for tenure, so this appreciation comes at a particularly good time. “Early-career recognition is something that, more and more, people are beginning to realize is important – at McGill and elsewhere – because our fields are so competitive, especially when you’re just starting,” he says. “From a very practical and basic standpoint, an award like this helps me when I apply for grants because it shows recognition and support from my university. It’s a little kick. And it builds confidence.”

Joelle Pineau

“I’m pushing the limit of ‘early career,’” laughs Joelle Pineau, an Associate Professor at the School of Computer Science, who joined McGill shortly after receiving her PhD in Robotics from Carnegie Mellon University. “But the quality of researchers we have at McGill is fantastic, so to be chosen like this is special.”

Joelle Pineau / Photo: Owen Egan

Pineau’s research combines basic mathematics with medical robotics to create real-world results with high social impact. As the co-director of the Reasoning and Learning Lab, much of her work focuses on developing decision-making and learning algorithms, then applying them to complex problems in robotics and health-care, such as designing “smart” wheelchairs that can learn how to navigate unfamiliar terrains and understand spoken commands.

Pineau’s work may be heavy on theoretical math, notes Rose Goldstein, but it is also firmly grounded in improving people’s quality of life: “For the care of patients who lack the physical or cognitive abilities to operate conventional motorized wheelchairs, such technology is a ‘game-changer.’”

Pineau is having a particularly good year, having also received a Tomlinson Scientist Award, which recognizes interdisciplinary collaboration, and being named a William Dawson Scholar. Much of her research over the past decade has been interdisciplinary – such as a wide-ranging collaboration with the multi-university Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal to explore issues of social inclusion and participation for people with physical disabilities—which by its very nature entails taking time to establish partnerships, recruit students and acquire funding. “They’re ambitious projects that take time to build up the right knowledge and infrastructure,” she says. “I feel like it is many efforts coming to fruition, and these projects are now reaching a stage of maturity where they’re having impact and getting noticed. It’s exciting and satisfying.”

Andrew Piper

“Post-tenure is a very distinct and in many ways challenging career phase,” notes Andrew Piper. The Associate Professor and William Dawson Scholar joined McGill in 2005, and received tenure in 2012. “Clearing that challenging bar of getting tenure brings a lot of introspection – there are a lot of studies that show this, and I’m certainly not immune to it myself. What happens is you end up with a lot of professional responsibilities – promotion commitments, reviewing manuscripts for presses – that tend to be lower on the satisfaction scale. We call it service work, and it really eats into time for teaching and researching. That space for thinking and creativity tends to get eroded and people go through a period of learning to balance that.

Andrew Piper / Photo: Owen Egan

“An award like this bolsters satisfaction at a key moment: It’s helpful to hear ‘You’re on an important track, keep going’ at this point in my career.”

A former Andrew W. Mellon New Directions Fellow and the current director of .txtLAB, a digital humanities laboratory at McGill, Piper explores the intersection of literature and technologies of reading, past and present. In praising Piper’s avant-garde work, Rose Goldstein cites how he is using new computational methods to develop a data-driven, revolutionary approach to how we think about art forms such as the novel – essentially using technology to uncover patterns and insights hereto hidden. At the same time, she says, he’s also a global thought-leader who is “making an outstanding contribution to larger debates about data-mining and the place of information technology within society.”

“McGill has a very large and talented faculty, across the disciplines,” says Piper, “so to be chosen for this recognition is special, and a real compliment.”

 

Your seven-day forecast is about to get more accurate

«McGill Reporter» - Mon, 05/25/2015 - 15:36

M.K. Peter Yau uses computational techniques to develop accurate representations of cloud processes. / Photo: Paul Fournier

Industrial Research Chair in short-term forecasting of precipitation renewed

By Meaghan Thurston

If there’s anything that unites human beings around the globe, it’s our habit of complaining about the weather. If there’s something that unites Canadians in particular, it’s our habit of complaining about the inaccuracy of weather forecasting. But what if weather forecasting – especially when it comes to predicting rain and snow – could be made more accurate?

That’s the issue Dr. M.K. Peter Yau, of the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences in the Faculty of Science is hoping to tackle. NSERC has announced the renewal of Dr. Yau’s Hydro-Quebec Industrial Research Chair, at a value of over $2 million with contributions from NSERC, Hydro Quebec, McGill and Environment Canada.

Under Phase II of the research program, Dr. Yau will continue his work in short-term forecasting of precipitation, with the goal of extending quantitative forecasting by up to seven days in advance, focusing in particular on the precipitation forecast over the province of Quebec.

While an accurate weather forecast is helpful when planning a beach day, accurate precipitation forecasts are crucial when predicting where flooding may occur or when estimating the inflow of water into reservoirs, which is essential to the efficient generation and distribution of hydroelectric power.

In Phase 1 of the NSERC/Hydro-Quebec Chair program, Dr. Yau developed cutting-edge computer models to improve short-term precipitation forecasting techniques: specifically forecasting when, where, how much, and what type of precipitation would occur over a lead time of one to two days.

Numerical weather prediction models are a mathematical representation of the atmosphere. However, it is challenging to develop models that can “look” far enough ahead in time to accurately predict precipitation patterns. To do this, models must perform a huge number of calculations and also be able to incorporate the many physics and dynamics of the weather system.

Dr. Yau’s goals are to improve precipitation prediction using the tools developed in Phase I, specifically, state-of-the-art representations of cloud processes that incorporate high-resolution radar observations of weather patterns. Yau will also continue his study of the physics behind the interaction of aerosols —minute particles suspended in the atmosphere— which are known to significantly affect cloud dynamics and the patterns and intensity of precipitation.

He is also aiming to improve the representation of convection, the concentrated, collective movement of groups or aggregates of molecules within fluids, in the Canadian computer weather prediction model.

Increasing the precipitation forecasting lead time to one week will therefore require a “multi-moment” model, which predicts the mass of precipitation particles, in addition to particle number concentration and radar reflectivity, and the use of a global weather prediction model in tandem with a regional model.

Yau’s work will ultimately assist atmospheric and climate scientists in improving both the Canadian regional and the global forecast models, and will assist Hydro-Quebec in better forecast of water inflow into reservoirs. “The improvement of physical processes in the global model would impact positively regional precipitation forecasts, as first guess field for data assimilation originates from the global model,” says Dr. Yau.

The funding of Dr. Yau’s Chair affords McGill the resources to fund a Junior Chair, Prof. Daniel Kirshbaum, who is conducting related research. The program will also maintain a stimulating environment for collaborative research between McGill trainees, Hydro-Quebec scientists, and Environment Canada researchers.

 

Your seven-day forecast is about to get more accurate

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Mon, 05/25/2015 - 15:36

M.K. Peter Yau uses computational techniques to develop accurate representations of cloud processes. / Photo: Paul Fournier

Industrial Research Chair in short-term forecasting of precipitation renewed

By Meaghan Thurston

If there’s anything that unites human beings around the globe, it’s our habit of complaining about the weather. If there’s something that unites Canadians in particular, it’s our habit of complaining about the inaccuracy of weather forecasting. But what if weather forecasting – especially when it comes to predicting rain and snow – could be made more accurate?

That’s the issue Dr. M.K. Peter Yau, of the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences in the Faculty of Science is hoping to tackle. NSERC has announced the renewal of Dr. Yau’s Hydro-Quebec Industrial Research Chair, at a value of over $2 million with contributions from NSERC, Hydro Quebec, McGill and Environment Canada.

Under Phase II of the research program, Dr. Yau will continue his work in short-term forecasting of precipitation, with the goal of extending quantitative forecasting by up to seven days in advance, focusing in particular on the precipitation forecast over the province of Quebec.

While an accurate weather forecast is helpful when planning a beach day, accurate precipitation forecasts are crucial when predicting where flooding may occur or when estimating the inflow of water into reservoirs, which is essential to the efficient generation and distribution of hydroelectric power.

In Phase 1 of the NSERC/Hydro-Quebec Chair program, Dr. Yau developed cutting-edge computer models to improve short-term precipitation forecasting techniques: specifically forecasting when, where, how much, and what type of precipitation would occur over a lead time of one to two days.

Numerical weather prediction models are a mathematical representation of the atmosphere. However, it is challenging to develop models that can “look” far enough ahead in time to accurately predict precipitation patterns. To do this, models must perform a huge number of calculations and also be able to incorporate the many physics and dynamics of the weather system.

Dr. Yau’s goals are to improve precipitation prediction using the tools developed in Phase I, specifically, state-of-the-art representations of cloud processes that incorporate high-resolution radar observations of weather patterns. Yau will also continue his study of the physics behind the interaction of aerosols —minute particles suspended in the atmosphere— which are known to significantly affect cloud dynamics and the patterns and intensity of precipitation.

He is also aiming to improve the representation of convection, the concentrated, collective movement of groups or aggregates of molecules within fluids, in the Canadian computer weather prediction model.

Increasing the precipitation forecasting lead time to one week will therefore require a “multi-moment” model, which predicts the mass of precipitation particles, in addition to particle number concentration and radar reflectivity, and the use of a global weather prediction model in tandem with a regional model.

Yau’s work will ultimately assist atmospheric and climate scientists in improving both the Canadian regional and the global forecast models, and will assist Hydro-Quebec in better forecast of water inflow into reservoirs. “The improvement of physical processes in the global model would impact positively regional precipitation forecasts, as first guess field for data assimilation originates from the global model,” says Dr. Yau.

The funding of Dr. Yau’s Chair affords McGill the resources to fund a Junior Chair, Prof. Daniel Kirshbaum, who is conducting related research. The program will also maintain a stimulating environment for collaborative research between McGill trainees, Hydro-Quebec scientists, and Environment Canada researchers.

 

Mission accomplished: Children’s moves to Glen

«McGill Reporter» - Mon, 05/25/2015 - 11:28

Loîc Bydal (right), 11, and Jouri Abdulmaola, 6, make their way to the Medicars that will take them to the Glen site. / Photo: Owen Egan

By McGill Reporter Staff

Following on the heels of the April 26 transfer of the Royal Victoria Hospital, the Montreal Children’s Hospital successfully moved 66 young patients to the Glen site yesterday in a well-orchestrated operation. The move took just under four hours.

Staff began moving patients to the new facility by ambulance at 7 a.m. The final patient was transferred a little after 11 a.m., hours ahead of schedule , McGill University Hospital Centre (MUHC) spokesperson Richard Fahey said.

“Countless hours have been put into making today a success and it truly paid off. This experience has been both a rare challenge and a privilege for the Montreal Children’s Hospital. The cooperation and support of everyone involved in this move has been exemplary,” said Dr. Harley Eisman, Medical Director of the Pediatric Emergency Service at the Montreal Children’s Hospital of the MUHC. “Healthcare providers, volunteers, Urgences-Santé paramedics, and the staff from Health Care Relocations should all be applauded for their hard work and dedication.

“Our patients and families are always at the forefront of everything we do and I am certain they will be very happy in this new home of ours,” said Dr. Eisman, also thanking the support of Médicar, the Ville de Montréal, the City of Westmount, Transports Québec and the SPVM.

As with the Royal Vic move, hospital staff worked in teams designated by colour-coded T-shirts to make sure the huge operation went off without a hitch. In all, almost 700 people, including staff and volunteers, took part in the transfer.

Originally, the plan was to move about 90 patients, but those who were well enough to go home were discharged before the move. The patients were transported by ambulance, one every three minutes, along with a nurse and often a parent. Patients with increased needs were accompanied by a doctor or a respiratory specialist. Each child was welcomed to at the Glen site with a teddy bear, a new blanket and a bag of goodies.

Adjacent to the adult hospital, the new Children’s comes complete with 154 single patient rooms, each with a section with large couches for parents to keep their children company both day and night. The facilities were designed with the input of Hospital staff to create efficient spaces that support best practices in pediatric medicine. By consolidating operations at the Glen site, the MUHC’s inter-disciplinary teams have the opportunity to come together to share their knowledge, discoveries and resources, furthering their contribution to the advancement of medicine in Montreal and the world.

“We have been dreaming, planning and preparing for this moment for many years and we are very excited to begin this new chapter in our lives,” said Martine Alfonso, Associate Director General of the Children’s Hospital. “When the Children’s moved to 2300 Tupper in 1956, I am sure the staff felt many of the same things we are feeling today: excitement, anticipation and the hope that we will forever honour our heritage as a hospital that always puts the patient and family first. I have no doubt we will continue to be that place.”

The Montreal Children’s Hospital’s clinical activities will gradually resume at the Glen site. The final phase of the MUHC 2015 transformation will come with the move of the Montreal Chest Institute and some services from the Montreal General Hospital on June 14.

More information on the new MUHC

Click on the thumbnails below to enlarge each picture. All pictures by Owen Egan.

Mission accomplished: Children’s moves to Glen

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Mon, 05/25/2015 - 11:28

Loîc Bydal (right), 11, and Jouri Abdulmaola, 6, make their way to the Medicars that will take them to the Glen site. / Photo: Owen Egan

By McGill Reporter Staff

Following on the heels of the April 26 transfer of the Royal Victoria Hospital, the Montreal Children’s Hospital successfully moved 66 young patients to the Glen site yesterday in a well-orchestrated operation. The move took just under four hours.

Staff began moving patients to the new facility by ambulance at 7 a.m. The final patient was transferred a little after 11 a.m., hours ahead of schedule , McGill University Hospital Centre (MUHC) spokesperson Richard Fahey said.

“Countless hours have been put into making today a success and it truly paid off. This experience has been both a rare challenge and a privilege for the Montreal Children’s Hospital. The cooperation and support of everyone involved in this move has been exemplary,” said Dr. Harley Eisman, Medical Director of the Pediatric Emergency Service at the Montreal Children’s Hospital of the MUHC. “Healthcare providers, volunteers, Urgences-Santé paramedics, and the staff from Health Care Relocations should all be applauded for their hard work and dedication.

“Our patients and families are always at the forefront of everything we do and I am certain they will be very happy in this new home of ours,” said Dr. Eisman, also thanking the support of Médicar, the Ville de Montréal, the City of Westmount, Transports Québec and the SPVM.

As with the Royal Vic move, hospital staff worked in teams designated by colour-coded T-shirts to make sure the huge operation went off without a hitch. In all, almost 700 people, including staff and volunteers, took part in the transfer.

Originally, the plan was to move about 90 patients, but those who were well enough to go home were discharged before the move. The patients were transported by ambulance, one every three minutes, along with a nurse and often a parent. Patients with increased needs were accompanied by a doctor or a respiratory specialist. Each child was welcomed to at the Glen site with a teddy bear, a new blanket and a bag of goodies.

Adjacent to the adult hospital, the new Children’s comes complete with 154 single patient rooms, each with a section with large couches for parents to keep their children company both day and night. The facilities were designed with the input of Hospital staff to create efficient spaces that support best practices in pediatric medicine. By consolidating operations at the Glen site, the MUHC’s inter-disciplinary teams have the opportunity to come together to share their knowledge, discoveries and resources, furthering their contribution to the advancement of medicine in Montreal and the world.

“We have been dreaming, planning and preparing for this moment for many years and we are very excited to begin this new chapter in our lives,” said Martine Alfonso, Associate Director General of the Children’s Hospital. “When the Children’s moved to 2300 Tupper in 1956, I am sure the staff felt many of the same things we are feeling today: excitement, anticipation and the hope that we will forever honour our heritage as a hospital that always puts the patient and family first. I have no doubt we will continue to be that place.”

The Montreal Children’s Hospital’s clinical activities will gradually resume at the Glen site. The final phase of the MUHC 2015 transformation will come with the move of the Montreal Chest Institute and some services from the Montreal General Hospital on June 14.

More information on the new MUHC

Click on the thumbnails below to enlarge each picture. All pictures by Owen Egan.

Convocation 2015: Celebrate today, bring on tomorrow

«McGill Reporter» - Fri, 05/22/2015 - 16:34

By Neale McDevitt

Convocation (May 26–June 3) represents the very best of McGill, past, present and future.

It is a rite rooted in the past. Steeped in tradition, the ceremonies pay homage to a bygone era while infusing them with new life. Every robe that is donned, every procession piped in, every time the Chancellor taps a graduating student with his cap – each symbolic garment and gesture is renewed by the enthusiasm and earnestness of Convocation’s participants, be they on stage or in the audience.

It is also the most wonderful snapshot of the present. Literally. Be it selfies with the statue of James McGill, class pictures on the steps of the Arts Building or portraits with family and friends in front of the Roddick Gates, no other event at the University is captured as frequently or with as much pride as is Convocation. This is culmination of years of hard work and dedication of students; the support and encouragement of friends and family; and the commitment and professionalism of faculty and staff. Some 5,000 students will take the short walk across the stage during the week and every one is a celebration of a job exceedingly well done.

But, most importantly, Convocation feeds the future with promise. The proud young men and women tossing their mortarboards into the blue sky today will be tomorrow’s law-makers, educators and artists. Like their fellow alumni before them, the Class of 2015 will go on to great things. They will cure and build and teach and lead. In short, they will pass on the valuable lessons they learned here at McGill and they will help make the world a better place.

The nuts and bolts of Convocation

In all, 13 individual ceremonies will take place from May 26–June 3. Here is the schedule for each Convocation ceremony:

Tuesday, May 26

6 p.m. – Continuing Studies

Wednesday, May 27

10 a.m. – Engineering

2 p.m. – Music

Thursday, May 28

10 a.m. – Management

2 p.m. – Law

Friday, May 29

10 a.m. – Health Sciences

2 p.m. – Education

Monday, June 1

10 a.m. – Arts and Religious Studies

2:30 p.m. – Arts

Tuesday, June 2

10 a.m. – Science

2 p.m. – Science and Students with a Degree in Arts & Science

Wednesday, June 3

10 a.m. – Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

2:30 p.m. – Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Each ceremony will last approximately two hours. Graduating students are asked to respect the limit of four guests. Seating is on a first-come, first served basis.

Additional guests or friends and family who can’t attend a ceremony in person can watch the proceedings via live webcast. In order to view the live webcasts you will need to make sure you have Microsoft Silverlight plug-in enabled on your computer.

Follow #McGillGrad2015 for a ‘social’ Convocation

Whether you’re near or far, there are many ways to share the excitement of graduation online:

  • Follow McGill on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for images and stories about the week’s activities.
  • Email photos you’d like to share and we’ll share the best.
  • Post your special grad moments and congratulate the new grad on social media with tweets, vines, photos or short videos, using the hashtag#McGillGrad2015. Highlights will be shown in a virtual album.

Get complete Spring 2015 Convocation information for graduating students and guests

Find out more about the 16 luminaries who will be receiving Honorary Degrees from McGill

 

Convocation 2015: Celebrate today, bring on tomorrow

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Fri, 05/22/2015 - 16:34

By Neale McDevitt

Convocation (May 26–June 3) represents the very best of McGill, past, present and future.

It is a rite rooted in the past. Steeped in tradition, the ceremonies pay homage to a bygone era while infusing them with new life. Every robe that is donned, every procession piped in, every time the Chancellor taps a graduating student with his cap – each symbolic garment and gesture is renewed by the enthusiasm and earnestness of Convocation’s participants, be they on stage or in the audience.

It is also the most wonderful snapshot of the present. Literally. Be it selfies with the statue of James McGill, class pictures on the steps of the Arts Building or portraits with family and friends in front of the Roddick Gates, no other event at the University is captured as frequently or with as much pride as is Convocation. This is culmination of years of hard work and dedication of students; the support and encouragement of friends and family; and the commitment and professionalism of faculty and staff. Some 5,000 students will take the short walk across the stage during the week and every one is a celebration of a job exceedingly well done.

But, most importantly, Convocation feeds the future with promise. The proud young men and women tossing their mortarboards into the blue sky today will be tomorrow’s law-makers, educators and artists. Like their fellow alumni before them, the Class of 2015 will go on to great things. They will cure and build and teach and lead. In short, they will pass on the valuable lessons they learned here at McGill and they will help make the world a better place.

The nuts and bolts of Convocation

In all, 13 individual ceremonies will take place from May 26–June 3. Here is the schedule for each Convocation ceremony:

Tuesday, May 26

6 p.m. – Continuing Studies

Wednesday, May 27

10 a.m. – Engineering

2 p.m. – Music

Thursday, May 28

10 a.m. – Management

2 p.m. – Law

Friday, May 29

10 a.m. – Health Sciences

2 p.m. – Education

Monday, June 1

10 a.m. – Arts and Religious Studies

2:30 p.m. – Arts

Tuesday, June 2

10 a.m. – Science

2 p.m. – Science and Students with a Degree in Arts & Science

Wednesday, June 3

10 a.m. – Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

2:30 p.m. – Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Each ceremony will last approximately two hours. Graduating students are asked to respect the limit of four guests. Seating is on a first-come, first served basis.

Additional guests or friends and family who can’t attend a ceremony in person can watch the proceedings via live webcast. In order to view the live webcasts you will need to make sure you have Microsoft Silverlight plug-in enabled on your computer.

Follow #McGillGrad2015 for a ‘social’ Convocation

Whether you’re near or far, there are many ways to share the excitement of graduation online:

  • Follow McGill on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for images and stories about the week’s activities.
  • Email photos you’d like to share and we’ll share the best.
  • Post your special grad moments and congratulate the new grad on social media with tweets, vines, photos or short videos, using the hashtag#McGillGrad2015. Highlights will be shown in a virtual album.

Get complete Spring 2015 Convocation information for graduating students and guests

Find out more about the 16 luminaries who will be receiving Honorary Degrees from McGill

 

Mac outreach bolstered by $1 million gift

«McGill Reporter» - Fri, 05/22/2015 - 12:24

By Katherine Gombay

A $1-million gift from Macdonald College alumnus J. William Ritchie, BSc(Agr)’51, will provide major support for McGill’s Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in its efforts to open the Mac Campus to more visitors and provide a unique, hands-on education into the critical role of agriculture in the food supply chain.

Ritchie’s gift will support construction and renovations to an original stone dairy barn dating back to 1907 and which will serve as the centrepiece of the Faculty’s renewed outreach efforts. The historic building is designated to become the Macdonald Farm Community Engagement Centre and will include the centrally located Lorna and William Ritchie Educational Hall. The 279-square metre hall will serve as an initial point of contact for visitors, accommodate a 140-seat instructional area and be home to multimedia displays and other interactive exhibits portraying the workings of the Macdonald Farm and themes related to agriculture, nutrition and food production.

“Thanks to the outstanding generosity of William Ritchie, our Faculty will be able to connect our teaching and research programs even more deeply with the community of which we are a part,” said Chandra A. Madramootoo, Dean of the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “As an internationally renowned leader in fields like sustainable agriculture, food safety and food security, and human nutrition, the Faculty is ideally positioned to contribute to important public engagement about agriculture and food production, and to showcase the vital link between good agricultural practices and a healthy, sustainable future.”

The Macdonald Farm Community Outreach Program currently provides bilingual guided tours aimed at educating school children about agriculture and environmental stewardship. Last year, more than 5,000 children participated in activities on the Ste. Anne de Bellevue campus during a limited spring and summer schedule. Operating on a year-round basis out of the new Centre, the Faculty estimates that the Campus and the Farm could welcome up to 15,000 visitors a year, mainly from surrounding suburban communities as well from areas closer to Montreal’s inner city.

“As a graduate of Macdonald College, I have come to appreciate the Faculty’s role and its proud tradition when it comes to agriculture, food, nutrition and the environment,” said Ritchie, a Nova Scotia businessman and loyal McGill volunteer and supporter who grew up in Montreal. “Supporting the Macdonald Farm Community Engagement Centre is an opportunity to open the campus, and its many activities, to even more students and more people in the community.”

Read more about William Ritchie and his recent gift in the McGill News.

 

Mac outreach bolstered by $1 million gift

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Fri, 05/22/2015 - 12:24

By Katherine Gombay

A $1-million gift from Macdonald College alumnus J. William Ritchie, BSc(Agr)’51, will provide major support for McGill’s Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in its efforts to open the Mac Campus to more visitors and provide a unique, hands-on education into the critical role of agriculture in the food supply chain.

Ritchie’s gift will support construction and renovations to an original stone dairy barn dating back to 1907 and which will serve as the centrepiece of the Faculty’s renewed outreach efforts. The historic building is designated to become the Macdonald Farm Community Engagement Centre and will include the centrally located Lorna and William Ritchie Educational Hall. The 279-square metre hall will serve as an initial point of contact for visitors, accommodate a 140-seat instructional area and be home to multimedia displays and other interactive exhibits portraying the workings of the Macdonald Farm and themes related to agriculture, nutrition and food production.

“Thanks to the outstanding generosity of William Ritchie, our Faculty will be able to connect our teaching and research programs even more deeply with the community of which we are a part,” said Chandra A. Madramootoo, Dean of the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “As an internationally renowned leader in fields like sustainable agriculture, food safety and food security, and human nutrition, the Faculty is ideally positioned to contribute to important public engagement about agriculture and food production, and to showcase the vital link between good agricultural practices and a healthy, sustainable future.”

The Macdonald Farm Community Outreach Program currently provides bilingual guided tours aimed at educating school children about agriculture and environmental stewardship. Last year, more than 5,000 children participated in activities on the Ste. Anne de Bellevue campus during a limited spring and summer schedule. Operating on a year-round basis out of the new Centre, the Faculty estimates that the Campus and the Farm could welcome up to 15,000 visitors a year, mainly from surrounding suburban communities as well from areas closer to Montreal’s inner city.

“As a graduate of Macdonald College, I have come to appreciate the Faculty’s role and its proud tradition when it comes to agriculture, food, nutrition and the environment,” said Ritchie, a Nova Scotia businessman and loyal McGill volunteer and supporter who grew up in Montreal. “Supporting the Macdonald Farm Community Engagement Centre is an opportunity to open the campus, and its many activities, to even more students and more people in the community.”

Read more about William Ritchie and his recent gift in the McGill News.

 

Deans appointed in Science, Grad Studies

«McGill Reporter» - Fri, 05/22/2015 - 11:18

McGill’s new Deans: Prof. R. Bruce Lennox will serve as Dean of the Faculty of Science, and Prof. Josephine Nalbantoglu has been appointed as Dean of Post-graduate and Doctoral Studies. / Photos: Owen Egan

By McGill Reporter Staff

McGill has two new Deans after the Board of Governors on Thursday approved the appointments of Prof. R. Bruce Lennox as Dean of the Faculty of Science, and Prof. Josephine Nalbantoglu as Dean of Post-graduate and Doctoral Studies.

Both will take up their positions on July 1 for five-year terms. Lennox replaces outgoing Dean of Science Martin Grant, while Nalbantoglu takes over in GPS from Martin Kreiswirth.

Lennox, who is currently Tomlinson Professor of Chemistry, joined the McGill faculty in 1987. He has served as Chair of Chemistry and has just completed a year-long term as President of the McGill Association of University Teachers (MAUT).

Since 2009, Nalbantoglu has served as the Director of the Integrated Program in Neuroscience, which is not only McGill’s largest graduate program, but Canada’s largest graduate neuroscience program, with more than 350 students and 190 supervisors. She is a member of the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery with affiliations to the Montreal Neurological Institute (the Neuro).

A McGill graduate, Nalbantoglu earned her PhD in Biochemistry from McGill in 1984 and returned as a faculty member in 1990 after pursuing research in Montreal, London and Saitama, Japan. The major focus of her laboratory at the Neuro has been the study of normal and aberrant gene expression in the nervous system. Prof. Nalbantoglu’s team is working to understand the molecular basis of neuropathology as observed in neurodegenerative diseases, as well as to develop therapeutic approaches for muscular dystrophy and brain tumours.

A Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, Royal Society of Chemistry (UK), and the Chemical Institute of Canada, Lennox led the renewal of laboratory teaching in the Department of Chemistry and has long been a proponent of increased interdisciplinarity, Masi said in a message to the McGill community. He has also made a point of providing undergraduates with opportunities to experience research at the laboratory level. Lennox, who is passionate about teaching and learning innovations, particularly at the undergraduate level, is a past winner of the Faculty of Science’s Leo Yaffe Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Prof. Lennox’s research program focuses on the design and synthesis of nanomaterials, with applications in biophysical devices, “smart” nanocomposites, and biosensors. This research has led to a number of collaborations with biochemists, neuroscientists, pharmacologists, microbiologists, cell biologists, chemical and electrical engineers, and physicists. His research group has been supported by more than $5 million in grants awarded by NSERC, FCAR/FRQNT, CIHR, and CFI, while the various roles he played in a number of research consortia helped bring more than $60 million in funding support to McGill. This latter amount includes funding for research facilities, major instrumentation and the Canada Excellence Research Chair. In all, Prof. Lennox’s research program has produced more than 130 peer-reviewed publications.

At its April meeting, the Board approved the appointments of Isabelle Bajeux-Besnainou, a Professor in Finance at George Washington University, as the new Dean of the Desautels Faculty of Management and Anja Geitmann, a cell biologist and a Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at the Université de Montréal, as Dean of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and Associate Vice-Principal (Macdonald Campus).

A search committee is being struck to find appropriate candidates for the next Dean of the Faculty of Arts, after former Dean Christopher Manfredi was appointed to replace Anthony C. Masi as Provost. Prof. Hudson Meadwell has been named Interim Dean of Arts.

 

 

Deans appointed in Science, Grad Studies

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Fri, 05/22/2015 - 11:18

McGill’s new Deans: Prof. R. Bruce Lennox will serve as Dean of the Faculty of Science, and Prof. Josephine Nalbantoglu has been appointed as Dean of Post-graduate and Doctoral Studies. / Photos: Owen Egan

By McGill Reporter Staff

McGill has two new Deans after the Board of Governors on Thursday approved the appointments of Prof. R. Bruce Lennox as Dean of the Faculty of Science, and Prof. Josephine Nalbantoglu as Dean of Post-graduate and Doctoral Studies.

Both will take up their positions on July 1 for five-year terms. Lennox replaces outgoing Dean of Science Martin Grant, while Nalbantoglu takes over in GPS from Martin Kreiswirth.

Lennox, who is currently Tomlinson Professor of Chemistry, joined the McGill faculty in 1987. He has served as Chair of Chemistry and has just completed a year-long term as President of the McGill Association of University Teachers (MAUT).

Since 2009, Nalbantoglu has served as the Director of the Integrated Program in Neuroscience, which is not only McGill’s largest graduate program, but Canada’s largest graduate neuroscience program, with more than 350 students and 190 supervisors. She is a member of the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery with affiliations to the Montreal Neurological Institute (the Neuro).

A McGill graduate, Nalbantoglu earned her PhD in Biochemistry from McGill in 1984 and returned as a faculty member in 1990 after pursuing research in Montreal, London and Saitama, Japan. The major focus of her laboratory at the Neuro has been the study of normal and aberrant gene expression in the nervous system. Prof. Nalbantoglu’s team is working to understand the molecular basis of neuropathology as observed in neurodegenerative diseases, as well as to develop therapeutic approaches for muscular dystrophy and brain tumours.

A Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, Royal Society of Chemistry (UK), and the Chemical Institute of Canada, Lennox led the renewal of laboratory teaching in the Department of Chemistry and has long been a proponent of increased interdisciplinarity, Masi said in a message to the McGill community. He has also made a point of providing undergraduates with opportunities to experience research at the laboratory level. Lennox, who is passionate about teaching and learning innovations, particularly at the undergraduate level, is a past winner of the Faculty of Science’s Leo Yaffe Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Prof. Lennox’s research program focuses on the design and synthesis of nanomaterials, with applications in biophysical devices, “smart” nanocomposites, and biosensors. This research has led to a number of collaborations with biochemists, neuroscientists, pharmacologists, microbiologists, cell biologists, chemical and electrical engineers, and physicists. His research group has been supported by more than $5 million in grants awarded by NSERC, FCAR/FRQNT, CIHR, and CFI, while the various roles he played in a number of research consortia helped bring more than $60 million in funding support to McGill. This latter amount includes funding for research facilities, major instrumentation and the Canada Excellence Research Chair. In all, Prof. Lennox’s research program has produced more than 130 peer-reviewed publications.

At its April meeting, the Board approved the appointments of Isabelle Bajeux-Besnainou, a Professor in Finance at George Washington University, as the new Dean of the Desautels Faculty of Management and Anja Geitmann, a cell biologist and a Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at the Université de Montréal, as Dean of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and Associate Vice-Principal (Macdonald Campus).

A search committee is being struck to find appropriate candidates for the next Dean of the Faculty of Arts, after former Dean Christopher Manfredi was appointed to replace Anthony C. Masi as Provost. Prof. Hudson Meadwell has been named Interim Dean of Arts.

 

 

CREATE grant to help study environmental change

«McGill Reporter» - Thu, 05/21/2015 - 09:35

Photo: Neale McDevitt

McGill professor Andrew Hendry has been awarded a $1,650,000 grant, to be distributed over six years, from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada’s (NSERC) Collaborative Research and Training Experience (CREATE) program. The CREATE program is designed to help graduates expand their professional and personal skills so they can make a successful transition from the classroom to the workplace. Students have the opportunity to enhance their ability to work productively in a research environment that has become increasingly multidisciplinary.

Prof. Hendry’s project, “Biodiversity, ecosystem services, and sustainability” (BESS), is aimed at addressing threats posed by environmental change to biodiversity, ecosystem services, and sustainability, particularly in tropical environments that are increasingly under pressure from natural resource extraction. The project will train environmental scientists in environmental monitoring, biodiversity surveying, and ecological impact assessments, and will impart the skills to develop mitigation strategies and design restoration projects.

“We would like to thank the NSERC CREATE program for their support of this research,” said Rosie Goldstein, Vice-Principal (Research and International Relations) at McGill. “This project will enhance our knowledge of the role biodiversity plays in supporting the various services provided by ecosystems, and it will assist McGill’s graduate trainees in the environmental sciences to gain research-related professional skills.”

 

CREATE grant to help study environmental change

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Thu, 05/21/2015 - 09:35

Photo: Neale McDevitt

McGill professor Andrew Hendry has been awarded a $1,650,000 grant, to be distributed over six years, from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada’s (NSERC) Collaborative Research and Training Experience (CREATE) program. The CREATE program is designed to help graduates expand their professional and personal skills so they can make a successful transition from the classroom to the workplace. Students have the opportunity to enhance their ability to work productively in a research environment that has become increasingly multidisciplinary.

Prof. Hendry’s project, “Biodiversity, ecosystem services, and sustainability” (BESS), is aimed at addressing threats posed by environmental change to biodiversity, ecosystem services, and sustainability, particularly in tropical environments that are increasingly under pressure from natural resource extraction. The project will train environmental scientists in environmental monitoring, biodiversity surveying, and ecological impact assessments, and will impart the skills to develop mitigation strategies and design restoration projects.

“We would like to thank the NSERC CREATE program for their support of this research,” said Rosie Goldstein, Vice-Principal (Research and International Relations) at McGill. “This project will enhance our knowledge of the role biodiversity plays in supporting the various services provided by ecosystems, and it will assist McGill’s graduate trainees in the environmental sciences to gain research-related professional skills.”

 

uPrint: New prices for campus printing as of June 1

«McGill Reporter» - Wed, 05/20/2015 - 15:27

As of June 1, the price of printing impressions using the uPrint service will be increased to the following:

Monochrome impressions (prints and copies):
Letter and Legal sizes: from $0.063 per impression to $0.065 per impression
Tabloid (11 x 17): from $0.126 per impression to $0.13 per impression

Colour impressions (prints and copies):
Letter and Legal sizes: from $0.20 per impression to $0.22 per impression
Tabloid (11 x 17): from $0.40 per impression to $0.44 per impression

The new price structure will apply to all print jobs released on June 1, at midnight.

Find more information on uPrint Campus Printing for Students and for Faculty and Staff.

uPrint: New prices for campus printing as of June 1

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Wed, 05/20/2015 - 15:27

As of June 1, the price of printing impressions using the uPrint service will be increased to the following:

Monochrome impressions (prints and copies):
Letter and Legal sizes: from $0.063 per impression to $0.065 per impression
Tabloid (11 x 17): from $0.126 per impression to $0.13 per impression

Colour impressions (prints and copies):
Letter and Legal sizes: from $0.20 per impression to $0.22 per impression
Tabloid (11 x 17): from $0.40 per impression to $0.44 per impression

The new price structure will apply to all print jobs released on June 1, at midnight.

Find more information on uPrint Campus Printing for Students and for Faculty and Staff.

McGill dans la ville : Mai 2015

«McGill Reporter» - Wed, 05/20/2015 - 13:24

L’infolettre mensuelle McGill dans la ville présente des projets d’engagement communautaire, des collaborations avec des entreprises ou des organismes locaux, des rencontres avec des experts de McGill, des événements à ne pas manquer ou d’autres renseignements susceptibles d’intéresser la communauté montréalaise.

MBA de deux ans : McGill affiche le plus haut taux de placement au Canada

Le passage du MBA de McGill à un modèle autofinancé, il y a cinq ans, s’avère un succès. Le programme, qui célèbre son 50e anniversaire, accueille 30 pour cent plus d’étudiants et les nouveaux revenus ont permis de bonifier le programme de bourses et les services de développement de carrière, notamment. Le programme affiche également le plus haut taux de placement au Canada parmi les programmes de deux ans, selon le Financial Times. Pour lire la suite, cliquez ici.

Vente du Cirque du Soleil : des synergies à exploiter

Le nouveau président du conseil d’administration du Cirque du Soleil et diplômé de McGill, Mitch Garber, estime que les sociétés détenues par TGP Capital et Fosun présentent de multiples possibilités de synergie avec le Cirque du Soleil. Il croit également qu’il ne sera pas difficile d’axer la gestion sur les résultats financiers tout en maintenant une culture de créativité. Pour lire la suite, cliquez ici.

Don de 7,5 millions de la femme d’affaires montréalaise Elizabeth Wirth

L’École de musique Schulich a reçu le mois dernier un don de 7,5 millions de dollars de la part de l’une de ses bénévoles et donatrices de longue date. Ce don permettra entre autres la création d’un prix d’interprétation vocale annuel de 25 000 $. En reconnaissance du généreux soutien d’Elizabeth Wirth, le nouveau pavillon de l’École de musique Schulich, construit en 2005, portera désormais son nom. Pour lire la suite, cliquez ici.

Moteurs hybrides en F1 : ce qui distingue une voiture de course d’une Prius

Lors du Grand Prix, du 5 au 7 juin prochain, à Montréal, les voitures devront, pour la deuxième année, être équipées de systèmes d’énergie hybrides composés de moteurs à essence haute performance et de puissants moteurs électriques alimentés par des systèmes électrogènes complexes. Deux jeunes ingénieurs de McGill expliquent ces avancées techniques. Pour lire la suite, cliquez ici.

Hollywood débarque à McGill

Le campus de McGill est un lieu de tournage prisé. Au cours des dernières années, l’Université a accueilli de nombreuses productions, dont Mommy et le dernier film de la série X-Men. Cet été, deux productions hollywoodiennes sont attendues. Pour lire la suite, cliquez ici.

 

Tournoi de jeux vidéo en projection extérieure : une première au Canada

Les 27 et 28 mai prochains, le Quartier de l’innovation de Montréal invite les amateurs de jeux vidéo à se rendre à l’angle des rues Peel et Notre-Dame pour participer au QI-Challenge. L’événement leur permettra de se mesurer à d’autres joueurs, dans le cadre de parties qui seront notamment projetées sur la façade de l’ancienne brasserie Dow. Pour lire la suite, cliquez ici.

McGill dans la ville : Avril 2015

McGill dans la ville : Mars 2015

McGill dans la ville : Février 2015

McGill dans la ville : Janvier 2015

McGill dans la ville : Décembre 2014

McGill dans la ville : Novembre 2014

 

 

McGill dans la ville : Mai 2015

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Wed, 05/20/2015 - 13:24

L’infolettre mensuelle McGill dans la ville présente des projets d’engagement communautaire, des collaborations avec des entreprises ou des organismes locaux, des rencontres avec des experts de McGill, des événements à ne pas manquer ou d’autres renseignements susceptibles d’intéresser la communauté montréalaise.

MBA de deux ans : McGill affiche le plus haut taux de placement au Canada

Le passage du MBA de McGill à un modèle autofinancé, il y a cinq ans, s’avère un succès. Le programme, qui célèbre son 50e anniversaire, accueille 30 pour cent plus d’étudiants et les nouveaux revenus ont permis de bonifier le programme de bourses et les services de développement de carrière, notamment. Le programme affiche également le plus haut taux de placement au Canada parmi les programmes de deux ans, selon le Financial Times. Pour lire la suite, cliquez ici.

Vente du Cirque du Soleil : des synergies à exploiter

Le nouveau président du conseil d’administration du Cirque du Soleil et diplômé de McGill, Mitch Garber, estime que les sociétés détenues par TGP Capital et Fosun présentent de multiples possibilités de synergie avec le Cirque du Soleil. Il croit également qu’il ne sera pas difficile d’axer la gestion sur les résultats financiers tout en maintenant une culture de créativité. Pour lire la suite, cliquez ici.

Don de 7,5 millions de la femme d’affaires montréalaise Elizabeth Wirth

L’École de musique Schulich a reçu le mois dernier un don de 7,5 millions de dollars de la part de l’une de ses bénévoles et donatrices de longue date. Ce don permettra entre autres la création d’un prix d’interprétation vocale annuel de 25 000 $. En reconnaissance du généreux soutien d’Elizabeth Wirth, le nouveau pavillon de l’École de musique Schulich, construit en 2005, portera désormais son nom. Pour lire la suite, cliquez ici.

Moteurs hybrides en F1 : ce qui distingue une voiture de course d’une Prius

Lors du Grand Prix, du 5 au 7 juin prochain, à Montréal, les voitures devront, pour la deuxième année, être équipées de systèmes d’énergie hybrides composés de moteurs à essence haute performance et de puissants moteurs électriques alimentés par des systèmes électrogènes complexes. Deux jeunes ingénieurs de McGill expliquent ces avancées techniques. Pour lire la suite, cliquez ici.

Hollywood débarque à McGill

Le campus de McGill est un lieu de tournage prisé. Au cours des dernières années, l’Université a accueilli de nombreuses productions, dont Mommy et le dernier film de la série X-Men. Cet été, deux productions hollywoodiennes sont attendues. Pour lire la suite, cliquez ici.

 

Tournoi de jeux vidéo en projection extérieure : une première au Canada

Les 27 et 28 mai prochains, le Quartier de l’innovation de Montréal invite les amateurs de jeux vidéo à se rendre à l’angle des rues Peel et Notre-Dame pour participer au QI-Challenge. L’événement leur permettra de se mesurer à d’autres joueurs, dans le cadre de parties qui seront notamment projetées sur la façade de l’ancienne brasserie Dow. Pour lire la suite, cliquez ici.

McGill dans la ville : Avril 2015

McGill dans la ville : Mars 2015

McGill dans la ville : Février 2015

McGill dans la ville : Janvier 2015

McGill dans la ville : Décembre 2014

McGill dans la ville : Novembre 2014

 

 

MBA de deux ans : McGill affiche le plus haut taux de placement au Canada

«McGill Reporter» - Wed, 05/20/2015 - 12:45

En préservant la petite taille des cohortes, le programme de MBA de McGill est en mesure d’offrir des services de développement de carrière personnalisés. / Photo: Christian Fleury

Le programme, qui célèbre cette année son 50e anniversaire, a gagné en popularité depuis cinq ans

Au moment de s’inscrire à la maîtrise en administration des affaires (MBA), il y a trois ans, Matthew Ronald était courtisé par trois universités prestigieuses, en plus de McGill : celles de Cambridge, de Notre-Dame (en Indiana) et MIT. Le Montréalais a choisi McGill, attiré entre autres par la structure du programme d’études et la présence de professeurs réputés. Il occupe aujourd’hui un poste de gestionnaire au sein de la compagnie aérienne Etihad, à Abou Dhabi, où il gagne quatre fois plus qu’avant ses études de MBA.

«Je veux éventuellement revenir m’installer à Montréal, dit-il, donc les possibilités de réseautage étaient aussi un critère primordial pour moi. J’ai beaucoup apprécié la petite taille du programme et le soutien exceptionnel offert par les services de développement de carrière.»

Shuang Yun, lui, a fait le trajet inverse. Originaire de la Chine, il s’est inscrit au MBA de McGill pour se réorienter vers la finance – il travaillait auparavant dans l’industrie du jeu vidéo. Il est demeuré à Montréal après son MBA, recruté par la firme d’investissement Jarislowsky Fraser.

Matthew et Shuang ont tous deux bénéficié de bourses d’études (atteignant respectivement
16 000 $ et 24 000 $) pour les aider à défrayer les droits de scolarité, qui sont désormais de
39 750 $ par année, des droits qui se situent dans la moyenne de ceux des grandes écoles de gestion du reste du Canada. Depuis 2010, le MBA de McGill – qui fête cette année son 50e anniversaire – est autofinancé, c’est-à-dire qu’il ne bénéficie plus de subventions gouvernementales. L’Université estimait que l’adoption de cette formule de financement était rendue nécessaire pour maintenir la qualité du programme, le seul MBA québécois à se classer dans le prestigieux classement du Financial Times.

«Nous avions auparavant un déficit de plus d’un million de dollars par année», souligne Don Melville, directeur du programme de MBA et des programmes de maîtrise à la Faculté de gestion Desautels de McGill. L’Université était donc forcée de puiser dans d’autres programmes pour financer le MBA.

Aujourd’hui, non seulement le programme ne présente plus de déficit mais les revenus additionnels ont permis d’accroître, entre autres, le nombre de bourses, les services de développement de carrière et la participation à des compétitions. Avec son taux de placement de 89 pour cent trois mois après l’obtention du diplôme, le MBA de McGill affiche le plus haut taux de placement au Canada parmi les programmes de deux ans, selon le classement 2015 du Financial Times.

Le programme accueille 30 pour cent plus d’étudiants qu’il y a cinq ans. On en a néanmoins préservé la taille intime avec une moyenne d’étudiants à temps plein de 75 à 85 étudiants (à titre comparatif, l’école Rotman de l’Université de Toronto accueille des cohortes de 350 étudiants).

«Puisque nos cohortes sont petites, nous sommes en mesure d’offrir un service personnalisé», indique Marie-José Beaudin, directrice générale du Centre de carrières Soutar.

L’adoption du nouveau modèle de financement a également permis la réouverture du programme à temps partiel, il y a quatre ans, offrant ainsi une option de plus aux étudiants qui souhaitent continuer à travailler pendant leurs études. Les Québécois sont toujours aussi présents au MBA de McGill, représentant plus de 30 pour cent des étudiants depuis que le programme est autofinancé, soit la même proportion qu’en 2009, un an avant l’adoption du nouveau modèle de financement.

Près de la moitié des diplômés sont recrutés par des employeurs montréalais après leurs études. Il reste que le caractère international du MBA de McGill est l’un des éléments les plus vendeurs : la diversité des étudiants (plus de la moitié viennent de l’étranger, d’une trentaine de pays), la diversité du corps professoral et un voyage d’études de dix jours à l’étranger (inclus dans le cursus et dans les droits de scolarité) qui permet aux étudiants d’en apprendre davantage sur le marché international. Et pour ceux qui veulent percer à l’échelle internationale, l’investissement rapporte : plus du quart d’entre eux obtiennent un emploi à l’étranger.

Pour lire d’autres articles du numéro de mai, cliquez ici.

 

MBA de deux ans : McGill affiche le plus haut taux de placement au Canada

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Wed, 05/20/2015 - 12:45

En préservant la petite taille des cohortes, le programme de MBA de McGill est en mesure d’offrir des services de développement de carrière personnalisés. / Photo: Christian Fleury

Le programme, qui célèbre cette année son 50e anniversaire, a gagné en popularité depuis cinq ans

Au moment de s’inscrire à la maîtrise en administration des affaires (MBA), il y a trois ans, Matthew Ronald était courtisé par trois universités prestigieuses, en plus de McGill : celles de Cambridge, de Notre-Dame (en Indiana) et MIT. Le Montréalais a choisi McGill, attiré entre autres par la structure du programme d’études et la présence de professeurs réputés. Il occupe aujourd’hui un poste de gestionnaire au sein de la compagnie aérienne Etihad, à Abou Dhabi, où il gagne quatre fois plus qu’avant ses études de MBA.

«Je veux éventuellement revenir m’installer à Montréal, dit-il, donc les possibilités de réseautage étaient aussi un critère primordial pour moi. J’ai beaucoup apprécié la petite taille du programme et le soutien exceptionnel offert par les services de développement de carrière.»

Shuang Yun, lui, a fait le trajet inverse. Originaire de la Chine, il s’est inscrit au MBA de McGill pour se réorienter vers la finance – il travaillait auparavant dans l’industrie du jeu vidéo. Il est demeuré à Montréal après son MBA, recruté par la firme d’investissement Jarislowsky Fraser.

Matthew et Shuang ont tous deux bénéficié de bourses d’études (atteignant respectivement
16 000 $ et 24 000 $) pour les aider à défrayer les droits de scolarité, qui sont désormais de
39 750 $ par année, des droits qui se situent dans la moyenne de ceux des grandes écoles de gestion du reste du Canada. Depuis 2010, le MBA de McGill – qui fête cette année son 50e anniversaire – est autofinancé, c’est-à-dire qu’il ne bénéficie plus de subventions gouvernementales. L’Université estimait que l’adoption de cette formule de financement était rendue nécessaire pour maintenir la qualité du programme, le seul MBA québécois à se classer dans le prestigieux classement du Financial Times.

«Nous avions auparavant un déficit de plus d’un million de dollars par année», souligne Don Melville, directeur du programme de MBA et des programmes de maîtrise à la Faculté de gestion Desautels de McGill. L’Université était donc forcée de puiser dans d’autres programmes pour financer le MBA.

Aujourd’hui, non seulement le programme ne présente plus de déficit mais les revenus additionnels ont permis d’accroître, entre autres, le nombre de bourses, les services de développement de carrière et la participation à des compétitions. Avec son taux de placement de 89 pour cent trois mois après l’obtention du diplôme, le MBA de McGill affiche le plus haut taux de placement au Canada parmi les programmes de deux ans, selon le classement 2015 du Financial Times.

Le programme accueille 30 pour cent plus d’étudiants qu’il y a cinq ans. On en a néanmoins préservé la taille intime avec une moyenne d’étudiants à temps plein de 75 à 85 étudiants (à titre comparatif, l’école Rotman de l’Université de Toronto accueille des cohortes de 350 étudiants).

«Puisque nos cohortes sont petites, nous sommes en mesure d’offrir un service personnalisé», indique Marie-José Beaudin, directrice générale du Centre de carrières Soutar.

L’adoption du nouveau modèle de financement a également permis la réouverture du programme à temps partiel, il y a quatre ans, offrant ainsi une option de plus aux étudiants qui souhaitent continuer à travailler pendant leurs études. Les Québécois sont toujours aussi présents au MBA de McGill, représentant plus de 30 pour cent des étudiants depuis que le programme est autofinancé, soit la même proportion qu’en 2009, un an avant l’adoption du nouveau modèle de financement.

Près de la moitié des diplômés sont recrutés par des employeurs montréalais après leurs études. Il reste que le caractère international du MBA de McGill est l’un des éléments les plus vendeurs : la diversité des étudiants (plus de la moitié viennent de l’étranger, d’une trentaine de pays), la diversité du corps professoral et un voyage d’études de dix jours à l’étranger (inclus dans le cursus et dans les droits de scolarité) qui permet aux étudiants d’en apprendre davantage sur le marché international. Et pour ceux qui veulent percer à l’échelle internationale, l’investissement rapporte : plus du quart d’entre eux obtiennent un emploi à l’étranger.

Pour lire d’autres articles du numéro de mai, cliquez ici.

 

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