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Brain area involved in addiction activated earlier than previously thought in recreational cocaine users

Newsroom - Tue, 05/23/2017 - 14:25

Even among non-dependent cocaine users, cues associated with consumption of the drug lead to dopamine release in an area of the brain thought to promote compulsive use, according to researchers at McGill University.

The findings, published in Scientific Reports, suggest that people who consider themselves recreational users could be further along the road to addiction than they might have realized.

Category:  press_releases Contact Person's Name:  Justin Dupuis Organization Name:  Media Relations Office Email:  justin.dupuis@mcgill.ca Work Phone:  514-398-6751 Source Site:  Source Site Published Date:  Tue, 2017-05-23 14:25

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Teaching practices could play an important role in preventing bullying

Newsroom - Tue, 05/23/2017 - 13:58

Classrooms that encourage competition between students may inadvertently be creating settings where bullying is more likely to take place. That’s one of the conclusions that can be drawn from work led by McGill University researchers Maria Di Stasio and Robert Savage, who recently published a paper on the subject in the Journal of Adolescence. But it’s only part of the story.

Category:  press_releases, educ_fac Contact Person's Name:  Maria Rosaria Di Stasio Email:  distasio@ualberta.ca Work Phone:  514-880-7509 Secondary Person's Name:  Chris Chipello Secondary Organization Name:  Media Relations, McGill University Secondary Email:  christopher.chipello@mcgill.ca Secondary Work Phone:  514-398-4201 Source Site:  Source Site Published Date:  Tue, 2017-05-23 13:58

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McGill alumna gravely injured in Times Square rampage

«McGill Reporter» - Mon, 05/22/2017 - 21:46

Elena Avetisian is in a coma, one of nearly two dozen victims of the May 18 Times Square drive-through rampage that killed a tourist.

By Doug Sweet

In 2007, Elena Avetisian was graduating from McGill in Continuing Studies, a bright future ahead of her. Today, the mother of three is fighting for her life in a New York hospital, one of the dozens of victims of a senseless automobile rampage through Times Square last Thursday that left one young woman dead.

In New York for a cousin’s wedding, Avetisian remained in a coma over the weekend.

A fundraising effort has begun to help provide support the family will need in the coming days and weeks.

“I write this with tears in  my eyes,” said Elena’s cousin, Anna Avetisian, on the Go Fund Me website set up to raise the needed funds. “Never would I have thought I would be creating a page like this.”

As of Monday night, nearly 200 people had raised more than $10,000 of a $20,000-goal in a single day.

Avetisian, 38, was taking pictures one moment, and in critical condition the next, the New York Daily News reported her relatives as saying. Her uncle, Emil Avetisian, 58, said his niece was separated from a group of relatives to buy a stroller for a tired child when the car sped through, according to the Daily News story.

On Friday, a judge ordered Richard Rojas, 26, held without bail on a charge of murder and 20 counts of attempted murder. A U.S.Navy veteran, who had been discharged for disciplinary reasons, American media reported over the weekend, Rojas told police he had smoked pot laced with PCP and declared that he wanted to “kill them all,” prosecutors said.

Avetisian’s sister and husband are staying in New York to be by her side, her cousin Anna said on the Go Fund Me site. “They will need to travel back and forth in order to take care of the children. Her girls are staying with their grandmother and miss their mother terribly. They need all the help and support they can get at this time.”

Another tourist, Alyssa Elsman, 18, of Michigan, was struck and killed on 7th Ave. when Rojas’s Honda Accord raced through the busy plaza. Her sister was also injured in the mayhem.

McGill alumna gravely injured in Times Square rampage

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Mon, 05/22/2017 - 21:46

Elena Avetisian is in a coma, one of nearly two dozen victims of the May 18 Times Square drive-through rampage that killed a tourist.

By Doug Sweet

In 2007, Elena Avetisian was graduating from McGill in Continuing Studies, a bright future ahead of her. Today, the mother of three is fighting for her life in a New York hospital, one of the dozens of victims of a senseless automobile rampage through Times Square last Thursday that left one young woman dead.

In New York for a cousin’s wedding, Avetisian remained in a coma over the weekend.

A fundraising effort has begun to help provide support the family will need in the coming days and weeks.

“I write this with tears in  my eyes,” said Elena’s cousin, Anna Avetisian, on the Go Fund Me website set up to raise the needed funds. “Never would I have thought I would be creating a page like this.”

As of Monday night, nearly 200 people had raised more than $10,000 of a $20,000-goal in a single day.

Avetisian, 38, was taking pictures one moment, and in critical condition the next, the New York Daily News reported her relatives as saying. Her uncle, Emil Avetisian, 58, said his niece was separated from a group of relatives to buy a stroller for a tired child when the car sped through, according to the Daily News story.

On Friday, a judge ordered Richard Rojas, 26, held without bail on a charge of murder and 20 counts of attempted murder. A U.S.Navy veteran, who had been discharged for disciplinary reasons, American media reported over the weekend, Rojas told police he had smoked pot laced with PCP and declared that he wanted to “kill them all,” prosecutors said.

Avetisian’s sister and husband are staying in New York to be by her side, her cousin Anna said on the Go Fund Me site. “They will need to travel back and forth in order to take care of the children. Her girls are staying with their grandmother and miss their mother terribly. They need all the help and support they can get at this time.”

Another tourist, Alyssa Elsman, 18, of Michigan, was struck and killed on 7th Ave. when Rojas’s Honda Accord raced through the busy plaza. Her sister was also injured in the mayhem.

$75,000 Cundill History Prize relaunched

«McGill Reporter» - Fri, 05/19/2017 - 15:39

‘Nixon in China’ historian Margaret MacMillan named to lead jury

By McGill Reporter Staff

In a time when people have trouble discerning what information is reliable and what isn’t, “fake news” has become the clarion call for many. In particular, the world is transfixed on the United States, where the some of the mainstream media has been riven along party lines and it seems as if unflinching partisan fealty has gained more currency in some newsrooms than the search for objective truth.

With that as the backdrop to volatile times, the relaunching of the Cundill Prize in History seems more a cultural necessity than an exercise in rebranding.

“History,” says Margaret MacMillan, “is part of the toolbox of democracy.”

Renowned historian Margaret MacMillan will serve as the Chair of Judges for the Cundill History Prize

MacMillan, a Canadian and an eminent historian and award-winning author, has been named as the Chair of Judges for the Cundill Prize, which celebrates its 10th anniversary this year.

MacMillan believes current events have made historical scholarship particularly relevant.  “We live in a challenging world and it is more important than ever to understand ourselves and others, where we came from and where we might be going, and only history can provide those insights,” says the current Warden of St Antony’s College and Professor of International History, at the University of Oxford.

The Cundill History Prize recognizes and rewards the best history writing in English, with $75,000 U.S. going to the winner, and the two runners-up each receiving a Recognition of Excellence Award worth $10,000 U.S. The Prize was established by F. Peter Cundill (1938-2011), a distinguished alumnus of McGill, a philanthropist and renowned global investor. A voracious reader and inveterate traveller, Cundill had an abiding passion for history who believed it was possible to comprehend the present and arrive at a measured perspective about the future only by first understanding the past.

McGill has commissioned a new brand identity for the 10th anniversary, complete with a redesigned website, which has just been launched. For the first time this year, a longlist will be announced in addition to a shortlist, followed by the three finalists.

Antonia Maioni, Dean of the Faculty of Arts, says the prize has been revamped “to evoke a better understanding of humanity and illuminate the truth at a time when objective facts are increasingly losing out to populism.

“At what feels like a turning point in world affairs, we at McGill believe it is more important than ever to champion the highest quality historical scholarship produced anywhere across the globe,” Maioni said.

Submissions are open until June 16, 2017, for books published in English between June 1, 2016 and May 31, 2017. The winner will be announced at the Cundill History Prize awards ceremony to be held in Montreal on November 16, 2017.

Past winners of the Cundill Prize in History include:

2016
Thomas W. Laqueur – The Work of the Dead: A Cultural History of Mortal Remains

2015
Susan Pedersen – The Guardians: The League of Nations and the Crisis of Empire

2014
Gary Bass – The Blood Telegram: Nixon, Kissinger and a Forgotten Genocide

2013
Anne Applebaum – Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe 1944-1956

2012
Stephen Platt – Autumn in the Heavenly Kingdom: China, The West, And The Epic Story of the Taiping Civil War

2011
Sergio Luzzatto – Padre Pio: Miracles and Politics in a Secular Age

2010
Diarmaid MacCulloch – A History of Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years

2009
Lisa Jardine – Going Dutch: How England Plundered Holland’s Glory

2008
Stuart B. Schwartz – All Can Be Saved: Religious Tolerance and Salvation in the Iberian Atlantic World.

 

$75,000 Cundill History Prize relaunched

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Fri, 05/19/2017 - 15:39

‘Nixon in China’ historian Margaret MacMillan named to lead jury

By McGill Reporter Staff

In a time when people have trouble discerning what information is reliable and what isn’t, “fake news” has become the clarion call for many. In particular, the world is transfixed on the United States, where the some of the mainstream media has been riven along party lines and it seems as if unflinching partisan fealty has gained more currency in some newsrooms than the search for objective truth.

With that as the backdrop to volatile times, the relaunching of the Cundill Prize in History seems more a cultural necessity than an exercise in rebranding.

“History,” says Margaret MacMillan, “is part of the toolbox of democracy.”

Renowned historian Margaret MacMillan will serve as the Chair of Judges for the Cundill History Prize

MacMillan, a Canadian and an eminent historian and award-winning author, has been named as the Chair of Judges for the Cundill Prize, which celebrates its 10th anniversary this year.

MacMillan believes current events have made historical scholarship particularly relevant.  “We live in a challenging world and it is more important than ever to understand ourselves and others, where we came from and where we might be going, and only history can provide those insights,” says the current Warden of St Antony’s College and Professor of International History, at the University of Oxford.

The Cundill History Prize recognizes and rewards the best history writing in English, with $75,000 U.S. going to the winner, and the two runners-up each receiving a Recognition of Excellence Award worth $10,000 U.S. The Prize was established by F. Peter Cundill (1938-2011), a distinguished alumnus of McGill, a philanthropist and renowned global investor. A voracious reader and inveterate traveller, Cundill had an abiding passion for history who believed it was possible to comprehend the present and arrive at a measured perspective about the future only by first understanding the past.

McGill has commissioned a new brand identity for the 10th anniversary, complete with a redesigned website, which has just been launched. For the first time this year, a longlist will be announced in addition to a shortlist, followed by the three finalists.

Antonia Maioni, Dean of the Faculty of Arts, says the prize has been revamped “to evoke a better understanding of humanity and illuminate the truth at a time when objective facts are increasingly losing out to populism.

“At what feels like a turning point in world affairs, we at McGill believe it is more important than ever to champion the highest quality historical scholarship produced anywhere across the globe,” Maioni said.

Submissions are open until June 16, 2017, for books published in English between June 1, 2016 and May 31, 2017. The winner will be announced at the Cundill History Prize awards ceremony to be held in Montreal on November 16, 2017.

Past winners of the Cundill Prize in History include:

2016
Thomas W. Laqueur – The Work of the Dead: A Cultural History of Mortal Remains

2015
Susan Pedersen – The Guardians: The League of Nations and the Crisis of Empire

2014
Gary Bass – The Blood Telegram: Nixon, Kissinger and a Forgotten Genocide

2013
Anne Applebaum – Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe 1944-1956

2012
Stephen Platt – Autumn in the Heavenly Kingdom: China, The West, And The Epic Story of the Taiping Civil War

2011
Sergio Luzzatto – Padre Pio: Miracles and Politics in a Secular Age

2010
Diarmaid MacCulloch – A History of Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years

2009
Lisa Jardine – Going Dutch: How England Plundered Holland’s Glory

2008
Stuart B. Schwartz – All Can Be Saved: Religious Tolerance and Salvation in the Iberian Atlantic World.

 

May 25: Free bike engraving

«McGill Reporter» - Fri, 05/19/2017 - 15:38

McGill Security Services will be teaming up with the SPVM (Montreal Police) to provide free bike engravings on the downtown campus on May 25.

Every year there are about 2,000 bicycle thefts reported to the police. Engraving your bike helps your chances of getting it back if it is stolen since the number that is etched onto your bike is permanent and entered into a database that can be accessed by many police stations. The program also deters theft since it makes it more difficult for thieves to resell a stolen bike.

The engravings will take place outside Burnside Hall (South Entrance) on May 25, from 1:00 – 2:30 p.m., rain or shine.

May 25: Free bike engraving

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Fri, 05/19/2017 - 15:38

McGill Security Services will be teaming up with the SPVM (Montreal Police) to provide free bike engravings on the downtown campus on May 25.

Every year there are about 2,000 bicycle thefts reported to the police. Engraving your bike helps your chances of getting it back if it is stolen since the number that is etched onto your bike is permanent and entered into a database that can be accessed by many police stations. The program also deters theft since it makes it more difficult for thieves to resell a stolen bike.

The engravings will take place outside Burnside Hall (South Entrance) on May 25, from 1:00 – 2:30 p.m., rain or shine.

Our graduate student Jade Lasiste was awarded at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) 2017 in Baltimo

Newsroom - Fri, 05/19/2017 - 14:12

Congratulations to our graduate student Dr. Jade Lasiste from Dr. Miguel Burnier’s lab in the Department of Pathology at the McGill University.  As part of the Closing Keynote Jade was awarded the "Member-in-Training (MIT) Outstanding Poster“ at the Annual Conference of Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO/Alcon) on Thursday, May 11, 2017 in Baltimore.

Category:  press_releases Bio Bio:  Jade Lasiste Joined Department of Pathology from Vancouver and just completed her M.Sc in Ocular Pathology Source Site:  Source Site Published Date:  Fri, 2017-05-19 14:06

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Our graduate student Jade Lasiste was awarded at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) 2017 in Baltimo

Newsroom - Fri, 05/19/2017 - 14:12

Congratulations to our graduate student Dr. Jade Lasiste from Dr. Miguel Burnier’s lab in the Department of Pathology at the McGill University.  As part of the Closing Keynote Jade was awarded the "Member-in-Training (MIT) Outstanding Poster“ at the Annual Conference of Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO/Alcon) on Thursday, May 11, 2017 in Baltimore.

Category:  press_releases Bio Bio:  Jade Lasiste Joined Department of Pathology from Vancouver and just completed her M.Sc in Ocular Pathology Source Site:  Source Site Published Date:  Fri, 2017-05-19 14:06

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Capsules capture a moment in time

«McGill Reporter» - Thu, 05/18/2017 - 17:43

Allan Oliver installs the Teflon time capsule in a column of the Roddick Gates. / Photo: Owen Egan

Roddick Gates time capsules give glimpse into today’s McGill, Montreal and Canada

By Neale McDevitt

On Monday, May 15, the second of two new time capsules was installed inside the Roddick Gates as renovation work on the Gates is entering its final phase. The time capsules, one made of Teflon and the other of stainless steel, contain an eclectic variety of items ranging from to McGill pins and unused Habs playoff tickets to handwritten letters and commemorative socks.

“A time capsule should be a snapshot of the times,” says Allan Oliver, Energy Control Technician, and the person who spearheaded the project. “I hope when people open the capsules, they will look at the contents and see that we were OK.”

But while the focus of any time capsule story is its contents, the story of what goes into assembling one can be just captivating.

Contents of the stainless steel capsule include dice, USB keys full of photos and commemorative Canadian socks

Oliver is a long-time veteran of McGill’s HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) unit. Befitting a man who will mark his 43-year at the University later this summer, Oliver is very interested in the passage of time. “I was never very good at school, except for history,” says Oliver with a chuckle. “I like knowing the stories behind things.”

Not surprisingly, Oliver is particularly interested in time capsules, sometimes going through archived records to see if he can find clues as to their whereabouts in McGill buildings of a certain vintage. “Many of the buildings in the City’s downtown core probably have their own time capsules, as do lots of McGill’s buildings,” says Oliver, whose sleuthing leads him to suspect one such capsule is located in the large stone marked “1963” by the Leacock entrance closest to the Redpath Museum.

When he heard that a time capsule was uncovered by construction workers in one of the columns on the east side of the Roddick Gates on March 1, Oliver was intrigued. Excitement gave way to disappointment when it turned out that the container had been damaged and the contents proved to be nothing more than a handful of paper, most of it degraded and covered by mold.

Workers prepare to seal the stainless steel time capsule atop the Roddick Gates arch. / Photo: Owen Egan

But, thought Oliver, with the Roddick Gates – complete with a piece of stone that was scored and chiseled specifically to fit a 2 x 5 x 7-inch time capsule – on the verge of being reassembled, why not install a new capsule?

“I went to Ron Critchley [Academic Adviser, BCOM Office] – who was my wingman throughout this – with the idea and he thought it was great,” says Oliver. “From there, Lori Podolsky and Gordon Burr [McGill archivists], sent me information from Heritage Canada on how to build a time capsule – I didn’t even know there were guidelines!”

Speaking to McGill engineers and tradespeople, Oliver decided to build two capsules, a Teflon prototype and the final stainless steel version. Engineering Dean Jim Nicell gave the OK to have the capsules built and engraved in McGill machine shops and Ram Panda, incoming Chair of McGill’s Board of Governors, even gave his input on designing the capsules’ gasketing. Most importantly, Oliver got the go-ahead from Luc Roy, Director, Building Operations, Facilities Operations & Development.

To fill the final capsule, Oliver says he spent much of his time “running around with my big bag – like Mary Poppins,” in a glorified scavenger hunt that took him from one corner of the campus to the other.

He got McGill service pins, from 15 years to 50, from Human Resources; McGill crests and assorted merch from the Bookstore; and campus photos from longtime University photographer, Owen Egan (stored on military-grade USB keys).

Non-McGill memorabilia included everything from a Vimy Ridge pin and a Liberal Party membership card to a Tim Horton’s card (“still with some money on it!”) and a pair of socks commemorating Canada’s 150th birthday – complete with decorative Mounties.

But Oliver didn’t want the capsule just to be a grab bag of items. He approached dozens of people – both in and out of McGill – to write personal letters. “There were no guidelines in terms of content, people were free to write whatever they wanted,” said Oliver, noting that, since he knew all the contributors, he made it a point of not reading anyone’s submissions, including that of Principal Suzanne Fortier.

Oliver added his own letter “to my unborn grandchildren,” he said with a smile.

The letters, all written on acid-free paper, were laminated to guard against degradation.

Quickly realizing he had too many items to squeeze into the stainless steel capsule, Oliver decided to use the Teflon prototype as well. Once all the items were in place, each capsule was flushed with argon gas three times to eliminate as much bacteria as possible before being sealed.

The Teflon capsule has been installed in a column on the east side of the Gates and the stainless steel version now rests in the arch where the original time capsule was found earlier this spring.

Oliver admits that this has been a labour of love. “It’s my legacy,” he says. “One of the things I wrote in my letter was something someone told me long ago. ‘What you have done, someone has done before you. What you are doing, someone will do after you. Do the best with the time you have.’

“Good words to live by.”

 

Capsules capture a moment in time

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Thu, 05/18/2017 - 17:43

Allan Oliver installs the Teflon time capsule in a column of the Roddick Gates. / Photo: Owen Egan

Roddick Gates time capsules give glimpse into today’s McGill, Montreal and Canada

By Neale McDevitt

On Monday, May 15, the second of two new time capsules was installed inside the Roddick Gates as renovation work on the Gates is entering its final phase. The time capsules, one made of Teflon and the other of stainless steel, contain an eclectic variety of items ranging from to McGill pins and unused Habs playoff tickets to handwritten letters and commemorative socks.

“A time capsule should be a snapshot of the times,” says Allan Oliver, Energy Control Technician, and the person who spearheaded the project. “I hope when people open the capsules, they will look at the contents and see that we were OK.”

But while the focus of any time capsule story is its contents, the story of what goes into assembling one can be just captivating.

Contents of the stainless steel capsule include dice, USB keys full of photos and commemorative Canadian socks

Oliver is a long-time veteran of McGill’s HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) unit. Befitting a man who will mark his 43-year at the University later this summer, Oliver is very interested in the passage of time. “I was never very good at school, except for history,” says Oliver with a chuckle. “I like knowing the stories behind things.”

Not surprisingly, Oliver is particularly interested in time capsules, sometimes going through archived records to see if he can find clues as to their whereabouts in McGill buildings of a certain vintage. “Many of the buildings in the City’s downtown core probably have their own time capsules, as do lots of McGill’s buildings,” says Oliver, whose sleuthing leads him to suspect one such capsule is located in the large stone marked “1963” by the Leacock entrance closest to the Redpath Museum.

When he heard that a time capsule was uncovered by construction workers in one of the columns on the east side of the Roddick Gates on March 1, Oliver was intrigued. Excitement gave way to disappointment when it turned out that the container had been damaged and the contents proved to be nothing more than a handful of paper, most of it degraded and covered by mold.

Workers prepare to seal the stainless steel time capsule atop the Roddick Gates arch. / Photo: Owen Egan

But, thought Oliver, with the Roddick Gates – complete with a piece of stone that was scored and chiseled specifically to fit a 2 x 5 x 7-inch time capsule – on the verge of being reassembled, why not install a new capsule?

“I went to Ron Critchley [Academic Adviser, BCOM Office] – who was my wingman throughout this – with the idea and he thought it was great,” says Oliver. “From there, Lori Podolsky and Gordon Burr [McGill archivists], sent me information from Heritage Canada on how to build a time capsule – I didn’t even know there were guidelines!”

Speaking to McGill engineers and tradespeople, Oliver decided to build two capsules, a Teflon prototype and the final stainless steel version. Engineering Dean Jim Nicell gave the OK to have the capsules built and engraved in McGill machine shops and Ram Panda, incoming Chair of McGill’s Board of Governors, even gave his input on designing the capsules’ gasketing. Most importantly, Oliver got the go-ahead from Luc Roy, Director, Building Operations, Facilities Operations & Development.

To fill the final capsule, Oliver says he spent much of his time “running around with my big bag – like Mary Poppins,” in a glorified scavenger hunt that took him from one corner of the campus to the other.

He got McGill service pins, from 15 years to 50, from Human Resources; McGill crests and assorted merch from the Bookstore; and campus photos from longtime University photographer, Owen Egan (stored on military-grade USB keys).

Non-McGill memorabilia included everything from a Vimy Ridge pin and a Liberal Party membership card to a Tim Horton’s card (“still with some money on it!”) and a pair of socks commemorating Canada’s 150th birthday – complete with decorative Mounties.

But Oliver didn’t want the capsule just to be a grab bag of items. He approached dozens of people – both in and out of McGill – to write personal letters. “There were no guidelines in terms of content, people were free to write whatever they wanted,” said Oliver, noting that, since he knew all the contributors, he made it a point of not reading anyone’s submissions, including that of Principal Suzanne Fortier.

Oliver added his own letter “to my unborn grandchildren,” he said with a smile.

The letters, all written on acid-free paper, were laminated to guard against degradation.

Quickly realizing he had too many items to squeeze into the stainless steel capsule, Oliver decided to use the Teflon prototype as well. Once all the items were in place, each capsule was flushed with argon gas three times to eliminate as much bacteria as possible before being sealed.

The Teflon capsule has been installed in a column on the east side of the Gates and the stainless steel version now rests in the arch where the original time capsule was found earlier this spring.

Oliver admits that this has been a labour of love. “It’s my legacy,” he says. “One of the things I wrote in my letter was something someone told me long ago. ‘What you have done, someone has done before you. What you are doing, someone will do after you. Do the best with the time you have.’

“Good words to live by.”

 

McGill accueille 6 000 personnes lors du Congrès de l’Acfas

«McGill Reporter» - Thu, 05/18/2017 - 13:34

Le Congrès annuel de l’Acfas (Association francophone pour le savoir), plus grand rassemblement scientifique du monde universitaire francophone, a eu lieu à McGill du 8 au 12 mai dernier. L’événement a été une véritable réussite. Les chiffres sont éloquents : 6 000 congressistes venus de 40 pays, et 3 400 communications scientifiques présentées dans plus de 200 séminaires portant sur 30 domaines de recherche. En outre, plus de 1 000 personnes ont participé aux 11 activités grand public de l’événement Science-moi!

« Nous sommes extrêmement fiers du succès qu’a connu le Congrès », se réjouit Allison Flynn, responsable de l’événement. « La coordination d’un événement d’une telle envergure à McGill n’est pas une mince affaire, et cette année, c’était plus complexe que jamais en raison des chantiers. Mais il y a tellement de gens – de dizaines d’unités un peu partout sur le campus – qui ont mis la main à la pâte et contribué à ce travail d’équipe colossal. Les choses se sont passées comme sur des roulettes. »

Il fallait notamment coordonner l’utilisation d’une centaine de salles réparties dans 20 immeubles du campus du centre-ville. Plus de 100 bénévoles de la communauté mcgilloise ont assuré la bonne marche de l’événement, servant de guides aux congressistes, répondant à leurs questions dans les kiosques d’information ou s’assurant du bon fonctionnement du matériel audiovisuel et informatique lors des présentations.

L’Acfas donne la priorité aux jeunes chercheurs, puisqu’elle souhaite leur permettre de parfaire leurs aptitudes de communicateurs et d’enrichir leur curriculum vitæ. Les 240 employés et étudiants de McGill qui ont fait des exposés sur les diverses tribunes provenaient de disciplines variées.

Comme le fait observer la principale Suzanne Fortier, le choix du campus comme cadre du Congrès permet aux organisateurs d’éviter la location d’un centre de congrès, ce qui représenterait des coûts énormes vu l’ampleur de l’événement. Or, ce sont les jeunes chercheurs et les étudiants qui profitent de cette économie, puisqu’ils peuvent assister au Congrès à moindre coût. En outre, la principale Fortier a confié au quotidien montréalais francophone Le Devoir que le français était de plus en plus présent à McGill, environ 60 pour cent des personnes sur le campus – étudiants et employés – étant en mesure de converser dans cette langue. « Nous encourageons nos étudiants à apprendre le français pendant leur passage à McGill. La culture francophone compte pour beaucoup dans l’attrait qu’exercent la ville de Montréal et l’Université McGill. »

Le Congrès de l’Acfas a eu droit à une excellente couverture médiatique. En effet, quelque 70 journalistes accrédités se sont mêlés aux congressistes, et leur présence s’est traduite par la publication de plus de 350 articles et entrefilets. Le Devoir a publié un supplément Acfas et Radio-Canada a organisé La semaine des sciences. Par ailleurs, de nombreux présentateurs du Congrès ont parlé de leur travail dans le cadre d’entrevues diffusées à la radio et à la télévision.

Enfin, #Acfas a été l’un des mots-clics les plus populaires sur Twitter à Montréal, et on a enregistré au-delà de 12 000 mentions « J’aime » sur la page Facebook de l’événement.

 

McGill accueille 6 000 personnes lors du Congrès de l’Acfas

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Thu, 05/18/2017 - 13:34

Le Congrès annuel de l’Acfas (Association francophone pour le savoir), plus grand rassemblement scientifique du monde universitaire francophone, a eu lieu à McGill du 8 au 12 mai dernier. L’événement a été une véritable réussite. Les chiffres sont éloquents : 6 000 congressistes venus de 40 pays, et 3 400 communications scientifiques présentées dans plus de 200 séminaires portant sur 30 domaines de recherche. En outre, plus de 1 000 personnes ont participé aux 11 activités grand public de l’événement Science-moi!

« Nous sommes extrêmement fiers du succès qu’a connu le Congrès », se réjouit Allison Flynn, responsable de l’événement. « La coordination d’un événement d’une telle envergure à McGill n’est pas une mince affaire, et cette année, c’était plus complexe que jamais en raison des chantiers. Mais il y a tellement de gens – de dizaines d’unités un peu partout sur le campus – qui ont mis la main à la pâte et contribué à ce travail d’équipe colossal. Les choses se sont passées comme sur des roulettes. »

Il fallait notamment coordonner l’utilisation d’une centaine de salles réparties dans 20 immeubles du campus du centre-ville. Plus de 100 bénévoles de la communauté mcgilloise ont assuré la bonne marche de l’événement, servant de guides aux congressistes, répondant à leurs questions dans les kiosques d’information ou s’assurant du bon fonctionnement du matériel audiovisuel et informatique lors des présentations.

L’Acfas donne la priorité aux jeunes chercheurs, puisqu’elle souhaite leur permettre de parfaire leurs aptitudes de communicateurs et d’enrichir leur curriculum vitæ. Les 240 employés et étudiants de McGill qui ont fait des exposés sur les diverses tribunes provenaient de disciplines variées.

Comme le fait observer la principale Suzanne Fortier, le choix du campus comme cadre du Congrès permet aux organisateurs d’éviter la location d’un centre de congrès, ce qui représenterait des coûts énormes vu l’ampleur de l’événement. Or, ce sont les jeunes chercheurs et les étudiants qui profitent de cette économie, puisqu’ils peuvent assister au Congrès à moindre coût. En outre, la principale Fortier a confié au quotidien montréalais francophone Le Devoir que le français était de plus en plus présent à McGill, environ 60 pour cent des personnes sur le campus – étudiants et employés – étant en mesure de converser dans cette langue. « Nous encourageons nos étudiants à apprendre le français pendant leur passage à McGill. La culture francophone compte pour beaucoup dans l’attrait qu’exercent la ville de Montréal et l’Université McGill. »

Le Congrès de l’Acfas a eu droit à une excellente couverture médiatique. En effet, quelque 70 journalistes accrédités se sont mêlés aux congressistes, et leur présence s’est traduite par la publication de plus de 350 articles et entrefilets. Le Devoir a publié un supplément Acfas et Radio-Canada a organisé La semaine des sciences. Par ailleurs, de nombreux présentateurs du Congrès ont parlé de leur travail dans le cadre d’entrevues diffusées à la radio et à la télévision.

Enfin, #Acfas a été l’un des mots-clics les plus populaires sur Twitter à Montréal, et on a enregistré au-delà de 12 000 mentions « J’aime » sur la page Facebook de l’événement.

 

McGill welcomes 6,000 people for Acfas Congress

«McGill Reporter» - Thu, 05/18/2017 - 13:21

By McGill Reporter Staff

With the dust still settling following the end of the Acfas (Association Francophone Pour Le Savoir) conference, held at McGill from May 8-12, the numbers speak to the event’s success. The annual congress, the largest scientific event in the French-speaking academic world, drew some 6,000 attendees from 40 countries and included 3,400 scientific papers in more than 200 seminars in 30 fields of research. As well, the 11 public events under the “Science moi!” banner attracted more than 1,000 people.

“We are so proud of the success of this year’s Congress,” said Allison Flynn, McGill’s Congress Director. “Coordinating an event of this size at McGill can be pretty complex, and this year’s ongoing construction projects added an extra layer of complexity. But so many people – from dozens of units across campus – contributed to this colossal team effort. It all really came together in the end.”

That team effort included coordinating the use of approximately 100 rooms in some 20 buildings on the downtown campus. More than 100 volunteers from the McGill community helped keep the event running smoothly, doing everything from working as guides and managing information booths to supporting classroom AV/IT.

Acfas prioritizes the work of young researchers, giving them an opportunity to build up their communication skills and CVs. The 240 McGill staff and students who presented in various forums were from a wide cross section of disciplines.

Principal Suzanne Fortier pointed out that holding a conference of this calibre on campus permits organizers to avoid the high cost of booking a commercial conference venue. Those savings are passed on to young researchers and students, allowing them to attend at a lower cost. Prof. Fortier also told Montreal’s Le Devoir newspaper that French is more and more prevalent at McGill, with roughly 60 per cent of those on campus – students and employees – able to converse in French. “We encourage our students to use their time at McGill to learn French. French language culture is a big asset which draws people to Montreal and to McGill.”

Acfas received ample media coverage. Some 70 accredited journalists attended the Congress, generating more than 350 articles and news items. Le Devoir published a special Acfas supplement and Radio-Canada organized “La semaine des sciences.” Many of those who presented at the conference were asked to do interviews about their work on the radio and television.

#Acfas trended on Twitter in Montreal, and exceeded 12,000 “likes” on its FB fan page.

 

McGill welcomes 6,000 people for Acfas Congress

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Thu, 05/18/2017 - 13:21

By McGill Reporter Staff

With the dust still settling following the end of the Acfas (Association Francophone Pour Le Savoir) conference, held at McGill from May 8-12, the numbers speak to the event’s success. The annual congress, the largest scientific event in the French-speaking academic world, drew some 6,000 attendees from 40 countries and included 3,400 scientific papers in more than 200 seminars in 30 fields of research. As well, the 11 public events under the “Science moi!” banner attracted more than 1,000 people.

“We are so proud of the success of this year’s Congress,” said Allison Flynn, McGill’s Congress Director. “Coordinating an event of this size at McGill can be pretty complex, and this year’s ongoing construction projects added an extra layer of complexity. But so many people – from dozens of units across campus – contributed to this colossal team effort. It all really came together in the end.”

That team effort included coordinating the use of approximately 100 rooms in some 20 buildings on the downtown campus. More than 100 volunteers from the McGill community helped keep the event running smoothly, doing everything from working as guides and managing information booths to supporting classroom AV/IT.

Acfas prioritizes the work of young researchers, giving them an opportunity to build up their communication skills and CVs. The 240 McGill staff and students who presented in various forums were from a wide cross section of disciplines.

Principal Suzanne Fortier pointed out that holding a conference of this calibre on campus permits organizers to avoid the high cost of booking a commercial conference venue. Those savings are passed on to young researchers and students, allowing them to attend at a lower cost. Prof. Fortier also told Montreal’s Le Devoir newspaper that French is more and more prevalent at McGill, with roughly 60 per cent of those on campus – students and employees – able to converse in French. “We encourage our students to use their time at McGill to learn French. French language culture is a big asset which draws people to Montreal and to McGill.”

Acfas received ample media coverage. Some 70 accredited journalists attended the Congress, generating more than 350 articles and news items. Le Devoir published a special Acfas supplement and Radio-Canada organized “La semaine des sciences.” Many of those who presented at the conference were asked to do interviews about their work on the radio and television.

#Acfas trended on Twitter in Montreal, and exceeded 12,000 “likes” on its FB fan page.

 

Turning skin cells into brain cells

Newsroom - Wed, 05/17/2017 - 13:42

Category:  press_releases Contact Person's Name:  Shawn Hayward Organization Name:  Montreal Neurological Institute Email:  shawn.hayward@mcgill.ca Work Phone:  514-398-3376 Source Site:  Source Site Published Date:  Wed, 2017-05-17 13:36

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Turning skin cells into brain cells

Newsroom - Wed, 05/17/2017 - 13:42

Category:  press_releases Contact Person's Name:  Shawn Hayward Organization Name:  Montreal Neurological Institute Email:  shawn.hayward@mcgill.ca Work Phone:  514-398-3376 Source Site:  Source Site Published Date:  Wed, 2017-05-17 13:36

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Aldo Bensadoun : « Le prochain Elon Musk ou Jeff Bezos sera peut-être un diplômé de McGill »

«McGill Reporter» - Wed, 05/17/2017 - 12:34

Développement du concept architectural par DMA Architectes. Illustration par Benoit Jacques.

Le prochain Elon Musk sera-t-il un diplômé mcgillois ? Aldo Bensadoun le souhaite et espère que son don de 25 millions à l’Université McGill y contribuera.

L’Université a annoncé la semaine dernière qu’une future École de gestion du commerce au détail verra le jour à l’automne 2018 grâce à un don de 25 millions de la Fondation de la famille Bensadoun.

L’École Bensadoun de gestion du commerce au détail pourrait avoir des retombées pour Montréal en y attirant des étudiants et des professeurs de haut calibre, sans compter les entreprises qui pourraient vouloir participer.

Aldo Bensadoun

Un secteur en crise
Depuis 10 ans, le commerce en ligne a bouleversé le secteur du commerce au détail à l’échelle mondiale. D’année en année, les entreprises spécialisées dans la vente en ligne grappillent une part de marché grandissante aux grandes surfaces.

« L’idée, c’est que le commerce au détail a beaucoup changé, on parle d’une véritable transformation et d’une révolution, dit Aldo Bensadoun. Les champions d’hier qui étaient les Walmart et les Zara doivent aujourd’hui pédaler très fort pour arriver à rejoindre leurs clients alors que des gens comme Amazon et Google ont compris le besoin du consommateur, ils s’adressent à eux et prennent une part énorme du marché. »

Une obligation morale
Cette réalité a convaincu Aldo Bensadoun de l’importance de créer un lieu destiné aux étudiants, aux professeurs-chercheurs et aux professionnels qui veulent réinventer l’avenir d’un secteur qui peine à composer avec la révolution numérique. Pour le philanthrope, il allait de soi que ce centre d’excellence s’installe à McGill, son alma mater.

« J’ai choisi l’Université McGill parce que c’est une institution forte et de calibre international, explique-t-il. J’ai étudié à McGill et j’ai donc une obligation morale et le privilège de pouvoir appuyer l’université. »

Des solutions innovantes
L’École Bensadoun de gestion du commerce au détail aura notamment le mandat d’étudier comment s’adapter aux nouveaux comportements des consommateurs et fournir aux détaillants des solutions innovantes, un succès qui sera largement tributaire de l’intégration de disciplines connectées comme l’analyse des mégadonnées, l’intelligence artificielle et les neurosciences. Le centre de recherche misera ainsi sur une approche multidisciplinaire et souhaite mettre à profit les nombreuses spécialités qu’abrite l’université, que ce soit en sociologie, en neurosciences, en architecture ou en sciences informatiques.

« Si nous avons un centre d’excellence à McGill, nous allons attirer les meilleurs étudiants de la planète et le prochain Elon Musk [fondateur de PayPal] ou Jeff Bezos [fondateur d’Amazon.com] sera peut-être un diplômé de McGill », rêve M. Bensadoun.

 

Aldo Bensadoun : « Le prochain Elon Musk ou Jeff Bezos sera peut-être un diplômé de McGill »

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Wed, 05/17/2017 - 12:34

Développement du concept architectural par DMA Architectes. Illustration par Benoit Jacques.

Le prochain Elon Musk sera-t-il un diplômé mcgillois ? Aldo Bensadoun le souhaite et espère que son don de 25 millions à l’Université McGill y contribuera.

L’Université a annoncé la semaine dernière qu’une future École de gestion du commerce au détail verra le jour à l’automne 2018 grâce à un don de 25 millions de la Fondation de la famille Bensadoun.

L’École Bensadoun de gestion du commerce au détail pourrait avoir des retombées pour Montréal en y attirant des étudiants et des professeurs de haut calibre, sans compter les entreprises qui pourraient vouloir participer.

Aldo Bensadoun

Un secteur en crise
Depuis 10 ans, le commerce en ligne a bouleversé le secteur du commerce au détail à l’échelle mondiale. D’année en année, les entreprises spécialisées dans la vente en ligne grappillent une part de marché grandissante aux grandes surfaces.

« L’idée, c’est que le commerce au détail a beaucoup changé, on parle d’une véritable transformation et d’une révolution, dit Aldo Bensadoun. Les champions d’hier qui étaient les Walmart et les Zara doivent aujourd’hui pédaler très fort pour arriver à rejoindre leurs clients alors que des gens comme Amazon et Google ont compris le besoin du consommateur, ils s’adressent à eux et prennent une part énorme du marché. »

Une obligation morale
Cette réalité a convaincu Aldo Bensadoun de l’importance de créer un lieu destiné aux étudiants, aux professeurs-chercheurs et aux professionnels qui veulent réinventer l’avenir d’un secteur qui peine à composer avec la révolution numérique. Pour le philanthrope, il allait de soi que ce centre d’excellence s’installe à McGill, son alma mater.

« J’ai choisi l’Université McGill parce que c’est une institution forte et de calibre international, explique-t-il. J’ai étudié à McGill et j’ai donc une obligation morale et le privilège de pouvoir appuyer l’université. »

Des solutions innovantes
L’École Bensadoun de gestion du commerce au détail aura notamment le mandat d’étudier comment s’adapter aux nouveaux comportements des consommateurs et fournir aux détaillants des solutions innovantes, un succès qui sera largement tributaire de l’intégration de disciplines connectées comme l’analyse des mégadonnées, l’intelligence artificielle et les neurosciences. Le centre de recherche misera ainsi sur une approche multidisciplinaire et souhaite mettre à profit les nombreuses spécialités qu’abrite l’université, que ce soit en sociologie, en neurosciences, en architecture ou en sciences informatiques.

« Si nous avons un centre d’excellence à McGill, nous allons attirer les meilleurs étudiants de la planète et le prochain Elon Musk [fondateur de PayPal] ou Jeff Bezos [fondateur d’Amazon.com] sera peut-être un diplômé de McGill », rêve M. Bensadoun.

 

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